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Old 01-03-2019, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
23,376 posts, read 22,371,243 times
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^^ My mother moved from England to the US in the 1940s. She not only had to learn how to cook*, but had to learn how to use a coal stove. Coal isn't quite forgiving as wood, but those stoves certainly could use wood.

*Food was so precious that her mother would never allow her to cook. Watching isn't the same as doing.
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Old 01-04-2019, 07:07 AM
 
Location: rural south west UK
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to many people these days "cooking" is throwing something in a microwave and nuking it for 3 minutes.
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Old 01-04-2019, 07:23 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
841 posts, read 186,915 times
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Done my share of caveman steaks directly on the coals of a wood fire. When I used to teach Hunter Safety classes, there was a volunteer Wildlife Officer in my teaching group. Everyone said that you could drop her off naked in the Everglades with only a hunting knife and she would walk out fully clothed and 10 pounds heavier. Now that is what I call old school.
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Old 01-04-2019, 07:27 AM
Status: "The best view is after the hardest climb." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
42,313 posts, read 33,771,498 times
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I found a terrific and very interesting cook book from the US and published in the 1920s. I've made several recipes from that book. They are written for use on a wood burning, coal, or electric (super fancy) stove/oven.

One thing that always strikes me as funny is that in many recipes, just the term "meat" is used. Any sort of meat I guess. Whatever you have on hand.

My favorite so far is Eggs in Prison. Of course, that might have to do with the name. Basically what you do is line muffin cups with "meat" - I usually use sausage but bacon is also good. Oh and you sprinkle bread crumbs in the bottom or cut a piece of day old bread in a circle that fits the bottom of each pan. Then break an egg into each muffin cup. Bake (I did it at 350 but the recipe doesn't specify - LOL) for about 20 minutes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.

You can also make this in ramekins - I like to use those sometimes because the name sounds so cute - it makes me feel like a hobbit or something!
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Old 01-04-2019, 08:59 AM
 
3,222 posts, read 597,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogboa View Post
Done my share of caveman steaks directly on the coals of a wood fire. When I used to teach Hunter Safety classes, there was a volunteer Wildlife Officer in my teaching group. Everyone said that you could drop her off naked in the Everglades with only a hunting knife and she would walk out fully clothed and 10 pounds heavier. Now that is what I call old school.
Yup, I knew a guy like that, Mors Kochanski. His book, "Northern Bushcraft" was my go to when I taught winter survival groups. I was lucky enough to have him as a guest a number of times, and he was amazing what he could do with virtually nothing. Saw him start a fire with two sticks in 20 seconds, (the trick is to make sure one piece of wood is a lot harder than the other), and how natives used to carry fire for hours by using a hard fungus growth on popular (aspen) trees which would as the coal, and wrap it in moss and carry it in a leather bag.

The go to meat was rabbit, squirrel, muskrat, beaver or grouse and depending on where one was, maybe fish. He brought a beaver along, skinned and slow roasted it on a reflector fire, and it was delicious. He showed us how to setup traps like natives did before steel traps were used. Of course, if it was spring or summer time, there was a lot of vegetation that could be used for food, but his course was focused on survival at -30.

His basic survival kit was an axe/hatchet, magnesium fire starter kit, a cheap Mora knife (great edge, and soft enough steel to use with the magnesium fire starter), snare wire, rope/twine, compass and signal mirror. Everything goes into the pot, which is used for melting water and cooking. (I would add a water filter to avoid things like beaver fever (giardiasis) and other pathogens).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mors_Kochanski

So not as skilled as going in naked, with a knife and coming out gained weight and fully clothed, but an amazing individual in any case.
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Old 01-04-2019, 03:34 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,105 posts, read 16,911,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normstad View Post
Yup, I knew a guy like that, Mors Kochanski. His book, "Northern Bushcraft" was my go to when I taught winter survival groups.
You knew Mors Kochanski?

My hat is off to you.
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Old 01-04-2019, 09:08 PM
 
3,222 posts, read 597,996 times
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Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
You knew Mors Kochanski?

My hat is off to you.
I'm lucky to know and have met him. My hat is off to him.
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Old Today, 10:19 PM
 
Location: San Diego
548 posts, read 401,724 times
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Nah. None of that chuckwagon, dutch oven colonial kind of stuff. I do most things in a crockpot, and I will say that I am very fascinated by my grandmother's generation. And by the stuff of middle america. I want to learn jello mold cooking.
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