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Old 12-31-2018, 05:48 AM
 
Location: North Oakland
8,983 posts, read 8,322,161 times
Reputation: 13782

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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Unlike my stainless steel pans that require scrubbing with SOS and soaking and they are a real pain to clean.
I don't have a problem with cleaning my stainless steel pots and pans. If something does get stuck on, I soak the stainless pan in a bit of Barkeeper's Friend and water, for no longer than 30 minutes. This is generally enough to remove crud and leave the stainless clean and shiny, though yours will be scuffed from the SOS pads. But all stainless scratches.

I use Dobie pads, though soft sponges are what's recommended, presumably because of the scratching. I don't know firsthand if it's the Dobie pads that do it or the Barkeeper's, as I'd been using the two together before I noticed the scratches when my cookware was new. But they do get scratched, and I find the Dobie pads provide such better cleaning action than soft sponges. Since you'll have scratched yours already with the SOS, I'd choose the superior Dobie pads. The scratching doesn't affect the cooking in any way.

I wonder what you're cooking, and how you are cooking it, that you find your stainless pans require scrubbing with SOS. Do you let things cook through all the way to their release point, or do you pull them off the pan before they are ready to release naturally?
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Old 12-31-2018, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Maine
5,999 posts, read 11,221,242 times
Reputation: 5338
Are you sure the temperature is high enough when you season the pans? I season even brand new pans. I buy completely rusted cast iron at yard sales for a few dollars, sand them with fine grit paper until the rust is gone, coat them in lard, and build a hot fire. When the flames are gone and the coals are red I bury the pans. Obviously not many of us can do this. It's a good demonstration of how hot cast iron can get without damage while being seasoned. Don't smoke yourself out of the house but get it as hot as possible.

I wash my cast iron with hot water when necessary, dry it over the propane flame, and put it away after it cools. Well seasoned cast iron shouldn't have to be oiled after each use. Once seasoned, it should last years as long as it's used properly.
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Old 12-31-2018, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,101 posts, read 4,380,855 times
Reputation: 17076
Scrubbing cast iron with soap or scouring powder is a BIG no-no once it's seasoned. It just removes all the seasoning and then you have to start over with the seasoning. Once it's properly seasoned, it shouldn't be necessary. It should make it non-stick.
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Old 12-31-2018, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,090 posts, read 7,788,103 times
Reputation: 14161
I just made a big pot of Texas chili in my cast iron dutch oven last night, which involved slow cooking for about 6 hours. There was a great deal of condensation on the inside of the lid, which I could see rusting if it wasn't properly seasoned.

There is a lot of folk wisdom out there on the internet, and I am sure that my thoughts are no better than anybody else's. For what it is worth, I do the initial seasoning with flaxseed oil, which is a tip I picked up here.

If you need to re-season, strip the pan down to the bare metal by putting it in the cleaning cycle of your oven. That ensures a nice, clean, even based to work on. Your baking soda treatment may be leaving some acidic (basic??) soda compound which is rusting the cast iron. But I am not a chemist, so don't look to my post for gospel truth.

After you cook and do your dishes, make sure that dutch oven is really, really dry. I throw it back on the cooktop with a light coating of olive oil for a few minutes until it is really hot. Then, I always leave a small air gap between the lid and the pot to allow moisture to escape.

After that, sacrifice a small animal and hope for the best.
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Old 12-31-2018, 04:05 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,368 posts, read 43,579,090 times
Reputation: 58675
There are only certain things that it’s practical to use cast iron for. I only use mine for frying and pot roasting without liquid, such as a brisket.. It stands to reason that if you cook liquids in it, the coating will deteriorate, so i don’t. If you only cook with oil in it, it with be happy.

I have other options for stews and sauces, etc. so I don’t use the cast iron.
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Old 12-31-2018, 05:52 PM
 
2,524 posts, read 1,784,419 times
Reputation: 4341
There are cast iron skillets and Dutch ovens that are porcelain coated, you know. I still have my moms that is 50 years old. Cooks great. No iron nothing except that great ability of iron to hold and distribute heat.

You bought the wrong stuff.
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Old 12-31-2018, 05:54 PM
 
1,457 posts, read 503,397 times
Reputation: 2736
cast iron cookware does not get "brains"
until after the 2nd year of constant use.
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Old 01-01-2019, 10:07 AM
 
6,001 posts, read 3,214,752 times
Reputation: 15883
Cast iron isn't that hard to take care of, but you have do it. First thing is to properly season the pan. One time usually won't do it. Then once it's seasoned, constant use and proper cleaning will take care of the rest. A little soap won't hurt but usually isn't needed. Wipe it clean, thoroughly dry, and wipe on a little oil. Best video I've seen on how to do it for most home cooks:

Seasoning:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBX5eA9pdsY

Maintaining:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlMjBVajilc
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Old 01-01-2019, 10:20 AM
 
856 posts, read 413,637 times
Reputation: 2424
So rather then sending DH out last night to grill our steaks, I said, ok, We will try cooking them in our cast iron skillet. Well, the whole house filled with smoke, and the smoke alarms were blaring.
The steaks, however were very good . Wondering what kind of oil, would prevent all the smoke. I can`t believe all this smoke is the norm.
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Old 01-01-2019, 10:34 AM
 
6,001 posts, read 3,214,752 times
Reputation: 15883
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcandme View Post
So rather then sending DH out last night to grill our steaks, I said, ok, We will try cooking them in our cast iron skillet. Well, the whole house filled with smoke, and the smoke alarms were blaring.
The steaks, however were very good . Wondering what kind of oil, would prevent all the smoke. I can`t believe all this smoke is the norm.
What kind of oil did you use? You need a high temp oil and despite all the Food Network and Racheal Ray hype, olive oil isn't the right oil for high temp cooking.

Now the other big thing is how high did you have the temp on the pan? It's really hard to get a high enough temp in most kitchens without some smoke from the meat. Most home kitchens really aren't designed to pull the smoke out fast enough. I have to be real careful when cooking meat indoors not to set off the smoke alarm. Which usually means starting with a hot pan to get a quick sear and then bringing the temp down fast, before it smokes too much.
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