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Old 01-03-2019, 10:56 AM
 
3,075 posts, read 1,346,397 times
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The correct method , that has worked for me so many times.

After use, clean with detergent and a sponge/scrubber. Then leave it on the stove on medium heat, until the water completely dissolves .Leave in the oven for storage.

If there is ever any rust stains, wash with a sponge and table salt, then use a brillo pad. Dry on top of a stove over medium heat, then store in a dry space.

For daily usage, I use a half teaspoon of canola oil, and wipe the cooking surfaces with a paper towel. Heat on medium before cooking. I do not need to use too much oil, unless for frying chicken parts. Eggs, pancakes, tortillas, searing meat ,etc only needs a little oil wipe.

I am 15+ years on the same cookware , mostly Lodge products. The only downside is the weight!
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Old 01-03-2019, 01:14 PM
 
Location: CO 'til October
1,600 posts, read 514,132 times
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I've read all the posts & appreciate everyone taking their time to respond.

Here's a helpful article:
https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/05/...it-matter.html

I'll update later... still under the weather & having surgery in a few days, so my mind is elsewhere... that's the only reason I haven't repped or replied to individual posts.

Thank you for all the replies & links. I've done all of them... every single method mentioned. Again, I'll update sometime next week... I'm re/seasoning like a madwoman now & will let you all know of the end results mid-month.

Happy New Year, everyone!
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Old 01-03-2019, 01:19 PM
 
24,791 posts, read 31,916,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
LODGE pans do not require the oven seasoning step.
If itís a preseasoned pan, then true.
But there are plenty of old Lodge pans out there that have had the preseasoning removed. My BF bought one and sanded all that off and got it back to a smooth surface. And then seasoned it. Much much better.r
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Old 01-07-2019, 02:33 PM
 
4,549 posts, read 5,117,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowmountains View Post
Wow, I have bought cast iron 3 times, twice I promptly returned it, the other one I gave away after seasoning it without using it at all. Was just overwhelmed by the care it needs. Your experience tells me never to buy it again.
Just bought one for the fourth time! Simply didn't think I should miss such a good deal. I plan to only use it for baking bread, not for cooking, so quality is not that much of a concern. a 3.2 qt cast iron dutch oven with lid for $17, pretty awesome deal.
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Old 01-07-2019, 04:04 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
9,071 posts, read 8,415,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowmountains View Post
Just bought one for the fourth time! Simply didn't think I should miss such a good deal. I plan to only use it for baking bread, not for cooking, so quality is not that much of a concern. a 3.2 qt cast iron dutch oven with lid for $17, pretty awesome deal.
So nice, you posted it twice.
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Old 01-07-2019, 04:23 PM
 
4,549 posts, read 5,117,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
I don't have a problem with cleaning my stainless steel pots and pans. If something does get stuck on, I soak the stainless pan in a bit of Barkeeper's Friend and water, for no longer than 30 minutes. This is generally enough to remove crud and leave the stainless clean and shiny, though yours will be scuffed from the SOS pads. But all stainless scratches.

I use Dobie pads, though soft sponges are what's recommended, presumably because of the scratching. I don't know firsthand if it's the Dobie pads that do it or the Barkeeper's, as I'd been using the two together before I noticed the scratches when my cookware was new. But they do get scratched, and I find the Dobie pads provide such better cleaning action than soft sponges. Since you'll have scratched yours already with the SOS, I'd choose the superior Dobie pads. The scratching doesn't affect the cooking in any way.
Most of my cookware are high quality stainless steel. They are naturally nonstick if you oil them properly when cooking; I've fried and flipped pancakes with them. And they are, indeed, super easy to clean. If dish detergent is not enough, just boil hot water, and when it gets boiled, add baking soda, soak for a few minutes, wash, and it's like new again with mirror finish. I never (never needed) to use touch scratching pads, just plastic brushes or sponges (esp. magic sponge, does wonder). Any touch pad/brush would cause scratches.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
So nice, you posted it twice.

I know, just to share the good deal I found.
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Old 01-07-2019, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,825 posts, read 702,121 times
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I bought a large lodge unseasoned skillet. Finally got it seasoned somewhat but still occasionally got some rust. I haven't had any problems since I pretty much stopped washing with soap and water. I just scrape with a plastic scrapper lighly, wipe it out with paper towels, no scrubbing, let it get crusty build up. Occasionally wipe down with vegetable oil. Store UPSIDE down in oven... that's the only place it fits for storage.
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Old 01-18-2019, 01:54 PM
 
2 posts, read 124 times
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I know there is a huge cast iron following and I don’t blame them. It’s awesome stuff. However I got rid of all my seasoned cast iron. It was extremely fussy and despite following guidelines of care the maintenance of the seasoning almost drove me crazy. It kept coming off in places, and the food was hard to get off without damaging said seasoning, then you’d risk rust....the last straw was when my attempts to avoid rust by going a little generous on the seasoning resulted in attracting bugs into my cabinet. Pulled out several pans with tiny bugs enjoying the seasoning and whatever else must have been baked into it. My lodge went straight in the trash and others onto Craigslist.

I failed at it, I suck at it. I know. I’m fine with that. Much happier with my le creuset enameled right now.
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Old 01-18-2019, 02:05 PM
 
974 posts, read 465,547 times
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I hate my cast iron skillet......more trouble, then it`s worth.
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Old 01-20-2019, 05:58 AM
 
Location: The Mitten
769 posts, read 1,085,804 times
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Great post on cast iron. If I read through a post like this, I wouldn't have bought at cast iron skillet or a Dutch oven. Now I have these pans and love using them. My cast iron skillet is the pan I use most, unless I have to cook tomato sauce, then it's my grandma's old, thick stock pot. Mostly, the cast iron though.

I have gone through these tips and tricks as well. I have reasoned the skillet multiple times and thought, 'if this is what requires of this skillet, then begone pest'. I would have given up on it, but I keep using them.

One tip I will share is using your oven's self cleaning mechanism. You won't need to use this all the time, or shouldn't need to use it that much. I had to do it a while ago, due to the seasoning making a thick coating on the inside of the pan. It started to crack and break off within my food. I tried scrapping it with a metal spatula, scrubbing it with an SOS pad, and then steel wool. All of this made the pad look horrible and only broke up the coating a little bit. I then tried re-seasoning the pan in the oven with Olive oil at 500 degrees, but that just added another layer to the bottom. I gave up and set it in my oven for a couple of days.

Putting it in the oven on it's clean cycle took everything off of the pan. It left a ring of rusty dust particles in the oven and a bit on the pan. I just washed that off, dried it with paper towel, turned the heat on until it was bone dry and applied a small amount of canola oil to it.

I love my cast iron pans. Last night I made beef barley soup! I had a copious amount of ribeye steak in my freezer. The ribeye melted in my mouth like butter.
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