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Old 12-30-2018, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Ft. Collins through 2019
1,547 posts, read 485,719 times
Reputation: 3489

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I'm about to give up on my Lodge cast iron Dutch oven. It's only 2-mos old. I use 1 piece or the other almost daily without any problem. But, when I place the lid on to slow cook meat & veggies for hours, the inside of both pans begins rusting while it's cooking.

It's not my imagination, cuz the Cornish hen I cooked the other day had an iron taste, which was wholly unappetizing. I've had this happen with other Lodge cast iron Dutch ovens I've owned before & it's what's always made me eventually toss them... sometimes I had to toss the food, due to the strong iron flavor. Still, I'd like to use the pots for a hen or roast, both of which I eat often... done in the crockpot isn't to my liking... it's cooked but not crispy, the way cast iron cooks.

After the pans cooled, to get rid of the visible orange rust, I sprinkled the inside of the pans with baking soda & scrubbed lightly with paper towels... had to do it 4-5 times for each piece, as the soda turned color with the rust it had absorbed. It worked great. When done, I rinsed with water, seasoned in the oven for an hour & they both look fine. But, this happens every time I use the pieces together, not separately.

Am I doing something wrong? I read that pans should be seasoned up to 6 times... is 1 seasoning not enough & I need to do it over & over?

This is what I have.

modcut
Anyone have this problem & if so, how did you fix it?
Thank you!

Last edited by Beretta; 12-30-2018 at 09:15 PM.. Reason: issue with picture formatting
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Old 12-30-2018, 03:29 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,330 posts, read 6,000,329 times
Reputation: 11434
Yes, it's because it's new and it still hasn't seasoned properly so the pores in the iron are absorbing water from the build up of steam inside when you have the lid on. Then it rusts from the insides of the pores out to the surface and you end up with what is called a patina of powdery oxidation on the outer surface. You need to fill the pores with oil so that the pores become seasoned too, not just the surface.

The way to do that is to season it every time you cook with it while you are cooking something. You do that by completely coating the entire inner surface and the insides of the pores of the pot and the lid with olive oil - literally work it in by rubbing the oil in all over with your fingers first (not with paper towel) and then next brush a thicker layer of oil over top of that, then put the food into the pot and cook as usual. Do that every time you cook with it, whether you have the lid on or not, until the iron pores have seasoned. You won't have to do it forever.

DO NOT use baking soda or any other kind of abrasive to remove a visible patina of oxidation. That will just make it rust up even worse. Abrasives and wire scrapers should only be used if there is a really thick crust of chippable rust on the surface that needs to be removed before starting to re-season a pan all over again from scratch. You do not have a crust of rust on your pot, so you only need to use oil to remove the visible patina of oxidation. Rub the oil in with your bare fingers or with a paper towel, then wipe it clean with another paper towel, then re-apply and rub in another coating of oil and then store it away like that without removing the last application of oil. Before cooking with it again, wipe it clean with a paper towel again then reapply oil to re-season it as described above while cooking the food. You won't get any rusty smell or taste in the food.

Once you have done this several times each time you cook with it for the next few months your new cast iron will become saturated and seasoned inside the iron, not just on the outside surface, and then there will be no more rust and you will only need to season it alone in the oven once a year, if at all.

I always wipe a thin coating of oil onto the inside surface of my cast iron just before I cook with it, and then again afterwards before storing it away, whether it actually needs it or not. I've been using all of my cast iron for more than 60 years and it's all now so well saturated with oil on the inside of the pores and outside on the cooking surface that it has become like a hard, shiny black shellac that has baked on. I could probably soak my pans in water for a month and they'd be impervious to the water now because they're so thoroughly saturated with oil that has turned to a hard shellac. Nothing sticks to it, nothing gets past it, no water, no air.

Don't give up on your new cast iron. Just keep on rubbing it down with a coating of oil every time you use it (before and after) and it will last you for your lifetime and the lifetimes of your children and grandchildren, etc.

Nothing beats cast iron for cooking in.

.
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Old 12-30-2018, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Eastern Tennessee
2,387 posts, read 1,607,464 times
Reputation: 6175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Yes, it's because it's new and it still hasn't seasoned properly so the pores in the iron are absorbing water from the build up of steam inside when you have the lid on. Then it rusts from the insides of the pores out to the surface and you end up with what is called a patina of powdery oxidation on the outer surface. You need to fill the pores with oil so that the pores become seasoned too, not just the surface.

The way to do that is to season it every time you cook with it while you are cooking something. You do that by completely coating the entire inner surface and the insides of the pores of the pot and the lid with olive oil - literally work it in by rubbing the oil in all over with your fingers first (not with paper towel) and then next brush a thicker layer of oil over top of that, then put the food into the pot and cook as usual. Do that every time you cook with it, whether you have the lid on or not, until the iron pores have seasoned. You won't have to do it forever.

DO NOT use baking soda or any other kind of abrasive to remove a visible patina of oxidation. That will just make it rust up even worse. Abrasives and wire scrapers should only be used if there is a really thick crust of chippable rust on the surface that needs to be removed before starting to re-season a pan all over again from scratch. You do not have a crust of rust on your pot, so you only need to use oil to remove the visible patina of oxidation. Rub the oil in with your bare fingers or with a paper towel, then wipe it clean with another paper towel, then re-apply and rub in another coating of oil and then store it away like that without removing the last application of oil. Before cooking with it again, wipe it clean with a paper towel again then reapply oil to re-season it as described above while cooking the food. You won't get any rusty smell or taste in the food.

Once you have done this several times each time you cook with it for the next few months your new cast iron will become saturated and seasoned inside the iron, not just on the outside surface, and then there will be no more rust and you will only need to season it alone in the oven once a year, if at all.

I always wipe a thin coating of oil onto the inside surface of my cast iron just before I cook with it, and then again afterwards before storing it away, whether it actually needs it or not. I've been using all of my cast iron for more than 60 years and it's all now so well saturated with oil on the inside of the pores and outside on the cooking surface that it has become like a hard, shiny black shellac that has baked on. I could probably soak my pans in water for a month and they'd be impervious to the water now because they're so thoroughly saturated with oil that has turned to a hard shellac. Nothing sticks to it, nothing gets past it, no water, no air.

Don't give up on your new cast iron. Just keep on rubbing it down with a coating of oil every time you use it (before and after) and it will last you for your lifetime and the lifetimes of your children and grandchildren, etc.

Nothing beats cast iron for cooking in.

.
Very good advice. Until your cast iron cookware is well seasoned avoid acid foods like tomatoes, vinegar etc and avoid cooking beans. I use cast iron pretty much every day and love it.
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Old 12-30-2018, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
19,838 posts, read 4,170,805 times
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I have enameled cast iron....to avoid those issues.
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Old 12-30-2018, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Ft. Collins through 2019
1,547 posts, read 485,719 times
Reputation: 3489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Yes, it's because it's new and it still hasn't seasoned properly so the pores in the iron are absorbing water from the build up of steam inside when you have the lid on. Then it rusts from the insides of the pores out to the surface and you end up with what is called a patina of powdery oxidation on the outer surface. You need to fill the pores with oil so that the pores become seasoned too, not just the surface.

That makes sense, but it's also happened previously with pans I had for 1-yr.

I've been slow cooking frozen meat lately... could that be causing extra steam as it thaws out that I normally wouldn't get, so that I should thaw the meat first?

Quote:
The way to do that is to season it every time you cook with it while you are cooking something. You do that by completely coating the entire inner surface and the insides of the pores of the pot and the lid with olive oil - literally work it in by rubbing the oil in all over with your fingers first (not with paper towel) and then next brush a thicker layer of oil over top of that, then put the food into the pot and cook as usual. Do that every time you cook with it, whether you have the lid on or not, until the iron pores have seasoned. You won't have to do it forever.
I'm well versed in seasoning, cuz I've read so many articles on it & posted here at least 2-3 times when having trouble with previous pans that it's exhausting. I'm doing all you've mentioned & have tried all kinds of oils, as well... many say don't use olive. I've used olive, lard, shortening, coconut, avocado, tallow, corn, melted animal fat, bacon grease & on & on. These stupid pans are costing me more time & money than I ever wanted to put into a pan. I've only endured it as I had lifelong anemia that disappeared once I began using cast iron in 2010.

Quote:
DO NOT use baking soda or any other kind of abrasive to remove a visible patina of oxidation. That will just make it rust up even worse.
I don't want rust patina inside my pan... if I don't remove it, food is unedible & tastes like rust. Baking soda is the only thing I've ever used that removed the rust. BTW, I've never had rust on the outside of any pans, so it's got something to do with cooking while covered.

Quote:
Once you have done this several times each time you cook with it for the next few months your new cast iron will become saturated and seasoned inside the iron, not just on the outside surface, and then there will be no more rust and you will only need to season it alone in the oven once a year, if at all.
Again, I've had pans for 1-yr & had the same issue. For the outside, I just use a saturated paper towel to wipe oil remnants over the pots & yes, I do it every single time, always. I can't possibly put any more oil inside the pans... it pools I use so much of it. The problem can be not seasoning every time... I do.

Quote:
Don't give up on your new cast iron. Just keep on rubbing it down with a coating of oil every time you use it (before and after) and it will last you for your lifetime and the lifetimes of your children and grandchildren, etc.

Nothing beats cast iron for cooking in.
I do all of the above & I have no kids or family, so I'm not worried about passing down my pans. They're about to be tossed in the dumpster, I'm so irritated. I've tossed 5-6 pieces away since 2010 due to this issue & having the interiors filled with rust, so much so, that nothing would remove it.

I just don't want to keep tossing my $$$ food cuz the pots rust while I'm cooking. I'm tired of all the extra work I do with cast iron & buying all the extra oils people said to use that didn't work... it's pricey & time consuming.

< Insert huge breath > Nevermind... I see stainless steel with a glass lid in my near future.
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Old 12-30-2018, 04:06 PM
 
840 posts, read 410,649 times
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I hate my cast iron pan too.....rusting.....a pain to wipe clean. Back to my old pan.
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Old 12-30-2018, 04:11 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
18,420 posts, read 17,604,650 times
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I have two cast iron frying pans that are really old. One is a Griswold skillet one is unmarked and has sides. They've never rusted, but I've only cooked things like pancakes, bacon, onions, home fries...that sort of thing. Maybe you should just cook things that use oil for now. I keep my two pans on top of the stove at all times--they've kind of heavy to keep putting away and dragging out.

Today I made home fries with onions and beaten eggs mixed in. All I did afterwards was wipe the pan out with a paper towel. It's clean but oily. Lots of times I will boil a tiny bit of water in the pan and wipe that out with a paper towel when it cools. I use regular pots and pans for other things, like boiling the potatoes. I use the frying pans for things that cook in oil.

Another thing I noticed was that Lodge isn't such good quality. It was rough. I found the Griswold pan in a thrift store and it's so much smoother that I got rid of the Lodge. But I would recommend cooking things that don't use water for a while, just oil.
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Old 12-30-2018, 04:23 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,330 posts, read 6,000,329 times
Reputation: 11434
Quote:
Originally Posted by A.Typical.Girl View Post
< Insert huge breath > Nevermind... I see stainless steel with a glass lid in my near future.

Okay, I'd still recommend against using baking soda or abrasives when oil alone will remove a patina due to the chemical reaction caused by applying oil to the oxidation, but I can totally sympathize with your frustration. Nobody should have to feel that way about cookware and if you're already doing all that you say then perhaps you simply aren't meant to use cast iron.

The only other things I'd recommend you try besides stainless steel is solid, clear tempered glass pots and pans, or ideally what GBH suggested. Enameled cast iron is the next best thing to bare cast iron because it will still provide the evenly dispersed radiant heat that bare cast iron provides. You won't have to worry about oxidation, but you absolutely cannot use abrasives to remove baked on food from enamel either because it will scratch and lose it's protective polished coating if you use abrasives. You will have to use bleach to remove baked on food.

Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
I have enameled cast iron....to avoid those issues.
GBH, perhaps you could recommend your favourite brand of enameled cast iron ware to ATG since I'm not familiar with what's available in USA.


.
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Old 12-30-2018, 04:38 PM
 
4,478 posts, read 5,013,841 times
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Wow, I have bought cast iron 3 times, twice I promptly returned it, the other one I gave away after seasoning it without using it at all. Was just overwhelmed by the care it needs. Your experience tells me never to buy it again.
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Old 12-30-2018, 04:39 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,330 posts, read 6,000,329 times
Reputation: 11434
Quote:
Originally Posted by A.Typical.Girl View Post


I've only endured it as I had lifelong anemia that disappeared once I began using cast iron in 2010..

It's ironic but I guess nobody informed you that it was the oxidized iron (rust) you were consuming that helped make your anemia disappear. Molecules of non-oxidized iron don't come off iron pans during cooking and then get consumed. It's the rust, which is still iron but iron that has oxidized and become softer and broken down, that you have been consuming and treating your anemia with.


.
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