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Old 01-04-2019, 11:33 PM
 
Location: :0)1 CORINTHIANS,13*"KYRIE, ELEISON"*"CHRISTE ELEISON"🙏 ❄⭐🎄⛄
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12th Night Cake

If you ever read or watched the movie by Charles Dickens a "Christmas Carol",

you probably heard or read the term "12th Night Cake". People all over the world

eat it on the 12th Night of Christmas. Which happens to be 12 nights after

December 25-Christmas Day. It is a huge celebration in a lot of homes around the world,

including in the US. I believe a lot of people eat & or bake it in Quebec, Louisiana & of course

other parts of the US. It is to celebrate when the Three Wise Men/ Three Kings visited & paid

homage to the Baby Jesus. Also called Epiphany. If I am not mistaken in places like

New Orleans, they will have the Kings Cake on the 12th Night & through Mardi Gras.

So, have you made a 12th Night Cake or a KINGS CAKE?

Do you eat it on the 12th Night of Christmas or afterwards as well?

Would you like to share your recipe with us? Thank you.

Here is a cool video with an old fashioned recipe:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DS1CQlacX2U


A Blessed CHRISTMASTIDE 2018-2019🎄

A Blessed & Happy 12th Night of Christmas-Epiphany to ALL!🎄

🎄 🌟 🎁 🔔 🙏 🎵🎄
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Old 01-05-2019, 07:36 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
296 posts, read 54,151 times
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Soon to be ex-son-in-law always orders a King Cake from some famous bakery in NOLA. He was born just across the river and lived there until his mid 20s. To me, it's a yeasty tasting, coffee cake sort of texture. Not something I would go out of my way to eat, but more of a traditional thing.
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:56 AM
 
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never heard of it...tho ive heard something called divinity...think it was a fudge...
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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I belong to an Episcopal Church, which is one of the churches that observes Epiphany ("Christmas is a season") and so someone usually makes one of these cakes for coffee hour on the Sunday nearest Epiphany.

They bake a cake and hide a plastic baby in it, and the person who gets the plastic baby (and doesn't choke on it) "wins". It just always grossed me out to know that there was this ugly tiny plastic baby in the cake, lol.
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:33 AM
 
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MightyQueen, that is what I heard about when I was in GA over the Christmas season one year. Except that the cake was not any specific recipe. The hidden baby was the essential element.
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
MightyQueen, that is what I heard about when I was in GA over the Christmas season one year. Except that the cake was not any specific recipe. The hidden baby was the essential element.
Yes, same here. The cakes I've seen it in have been basic yellow cakes.
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Old 01-05-2019, 08:52 PM
 
Location: :0)1 CORINTHIANS,13*"KYRIE, ELEISON"*"CHRISTE ELEISON"🙏 ❄⭐🎄⛄
2,704 posts, read 5,018,564 times
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Thumbs up Thanks! Merry Christmas & Happy New Year 2019!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Medtran49 View Post
Soon to be ex-son-in-law always orders a King Cake from some famous bakery in NOLA. He was born just across the river and lived there until his mid 20s. To me, it's a yeasty tasting, coffee cake sort of texture. Not something I would go out of my way to eat, but more of a traditional thing.

Thanks for your post

If I am not mistaken, the Kings Cake from NOLA is a bit different from the typical 12th Night Cake. Although both are used to celebrate the
12th Night of Christmas, Epiphany. Part of the Christmas Season.


I believe that the 12th Night Cake is similar to what a Fruit Cake might be, but it tastes a lot better than a regular Fruit Cake. A lot of 12th Night Cake recipes are from England, and I think the American fruit cake probably came from that.

But, again, what I have noticed is that even though you might have dried fruits & similar ingredients in a fruit cake, a panettone, a Christmas Cake, a 12th Night Cake, a plum pudding, they are NOT the same thing.

I find the history of all of these cakes, recipes, traditions fascinating. And I love to hear of different family recipes & or traditions

Thank you for your input.

A Blessed 12th Night-A Blessed Epiphany-A Blessed Christmas Season to ALL!

🎄 🌟 🎁 🔔 🙏 🎵🎄
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:50 PM
 
11,486 posts, read 6,865,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by countrylv22 View Post
If I am not mistaken, the Kings Cake from NOLA is a bit different from the typical 12th Night Cake. Although both are used to celebrate the 12th Night of Christmas, Epiphany. Part of the Christmas Season.

I believe that the 12th Night Cake is similar to what a Fruit Cake might be, but it tastes a lot better than a regular Fruit Cake. A lot of 12th Night Cake recipes are from England, and I think the American fruit cake probably came from that.
I always thought the fruit cake like dessert in England was Christmas Cake, which is different from a 12th night cake.

The 12th night, or king cakes, that I've had are more like a brioche type braided cake, or even a puff pastry, with icing and sugared sprinkles.
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:06 PM
Status: "The best view is after the hardest climb." (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Wonderland
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A King Cake in New Orleans is pretty specific:

https://www.nola.com/expo/life-and-c...whats-new.html

They are typically braided and covered in icing, which is sometimes in Mardi Gras colors (green, purple and gold). But there are lots of different flavors.

King cakes are especially popular between Jan 6 and Ash Wednesday (this year March 6).

This year, Blue Bell ice cream has a Mardi Gras flavor out, and supposedly it's "king cake" flavored.

Laissez les bon temps rouler!
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:59 PM
 
294 posts, read 96,350 times
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I purchase a The Galette des Rois or King Cake every year from my french bakery.

It is only available on the Epiphany. It isn't a cake, but more of a pastry. No fruit involved. It is a Catholic tradition, not a Protestant one so I don't believe England has Kings Cake.

I've never made it, but here a link https://frenchfoodintheus.org/1059

Ingredients:
– cup of Sugar
– 1/3 cup of Butter
– 2 eggs
– 2 yolks
– 1 cup of Ground almond
– 2 rolls of puff pastry

For the frangipane

Whip the sugar and the butter at room temperature until the mix whitens. Add one whole egg while keeping whipping, then the ground almond and then the other egg. Mix well.

For the puff pastry

Cook or buy the equivalent of 2 rolls of puff pastry. Spread each puff pastry in the shape of a plate. On one of the puff pastry, pour the Frangipane in the middle and spread it on the pastry while avoiding the sides. Put the other pastry on top and roll the sides towards the inside to seal the galette. Then take a brush and spread some yolk on the whole cake to give it a golden color. Let the whole cake rest for 45 minutes. Spread again some yolk. With a knife, draw horizontal and vertical lines on the dough (without cutting it!) and put in an oven for 25 minutes at 400 F. Serve mild or hot and enjoy!
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