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Old 02-02-2019, 11:16 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
34,789 posts, read 53,342,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Was there a time when big brands like Folger’s and Maxwell House had a lot of arabica beans in their blends, then switched to lower-quality robusta as specialty coffee increased in demand?
People want cheap, not quality.
What you expect if a container of Folgers or Maxwell, that gives 300 servings, cost $5? It's cheap, it's weak and people drink a full pot or two a day. Most get an indigestion from it. The typical, cheap coffee maker is just a right tool for that crap.
The coffee doesn't smell either.
A good, quality fresh made coffee fills the room with the aroma. Not Maxwell or Folgers...

https://www.coffeedetective.com/maxwell-house-sick.html
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Last edited by elnina; 02-02-2019 at 11:31 PM..
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Old 02-02-2019, 11:24 PM
 
19,029 posts, read 12,462,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Was there a time when big brands like Folger’s and Maxwell House had a lot of arabica beans in their blends, then switched to lower-quality robusta as specialty coffee increased in demand?

You've answered your own question with a few key words; "mass" and "produced".


Nearly all the popular supermarket/mass produced coffees in USA are owned by international conglomerates. Kraft owned Maxwell House for instance, but has since sold it off.


A&P's famous Eight 0'Clock coffee is another that isn't what it once was. Growing up in the 1970's most homes I knew used three main brands of coffee; Maxwell House, Eight 0'Clock or Chock Full of Nuts.

Basically profits have taken over from quality. Higher percentage of robusta beans versus arabica, if not totally made from the former.


Ironically that caffeine jolt Americans associate with "good coffee" comes from the higher percentage or domination of robusta beans in the historical coffee market. Robusta coffee contains higher amounts of caffeine than arabica, but at a cost of being more bitter. Hence all the tricks used by Americans (adding chicory, lots of sugar, milk and or half and half), to cover up that bitter taste.


https://theroasterspack.com/blogs/ne...arabica-coffee

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/kr...e-coffee-blend


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell_House


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chock_full_o%27Nuts

Last edited by BugsyPal; 02-02-2019 at 11:56 PM..
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Old 02-03-2019, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
8,972 posts, read 8,935,043 times
Reputation: 6309
At least Eight O’ Clock coffee is still made with arabica beans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
You've answered your own question with a few key words; "mass" and "produced".


Nearly all the popular supermarket/mass produced coffees in USA are owned by international conglomerates. Kraft owned Maxwell House for instance, but has since sold it off.


A&P's famous Eight 0'Clock coffee is another that isn't what it once was. Growing up in the 1970's most homes I knew used three main brands of coffee; Maxwell House, Eight 0'Clock or Chock Full of Nuts.

Basically profits have taken over from quality. Higher percentage of robusta beans versus arabica, if not totally made from the former.


Ironically that caffeine jolt Americans associate with "good coffee" comes from the higher percentage or domination of robusta beans in the historical coffee market. Robusta coffee contains higher amounts of caffeine than arabica, but at a cost of being more bitter. Hence all the tricks used by Americans (adding chicory, lots of sugar, milk and or half and half), to cover up that bitter taste.


https://theroasterspack.com/blogs/ne...arabica-coffee

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/kr...e-coffee-blend


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell_House


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chock_full_o%27Nuts
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Old 02-03-2019, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
8,972 posts, read 8,935,043 times
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I guess one reason why Nescafé is so popular in Latin America is that most of the people who live in the nations that raise high-quality coffee can’t afford to buy it themselves.
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Old 02-03-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,663 posts, read 14,570,866 times
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I bought Yuban for years. I don't see it any more. I have bought Folgers now for years now and like it.
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Old 02-03-2019, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
20,145 posts, read 13,231,721 times
Reputation: 26851
I am sure my parents bought whatever was cheapest for coffee. I used to buy a St. Louis brand, Tiger Coffee. Dana Brown advertised it with footage he shot in Africa of shooting big cats. For a number of years I bought his half decaffeinated half regular coffee. It was a great idea. You reduced your caffeine, but you git a full flavored cup. I’d probably hate it today.
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Old 02-03-2019, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,663 posts, read 14,570,866 times
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I just remembered the coffee I drank in Florida when I was in the Navy; Lousianne It was roasted in Louisiana and it had chicory in it. I liked it OK.
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Old 02-03-2019, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
8,972 posts, read 8,935,043 times
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Every once in a while, I will buy a bag of arabica coffee on sale and mix it with what’s left in a can of big brand or store-brand coffee. But instead of making bad coffee better , it makes good coffee worse.
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Old 02-03-2019, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
8,972 posts, read 8,935,043 times
Reputation: 6309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
I just remembered the coffee I drank in Florida when I was in the Navy; Lousianne It was roasted in Louisiana and it had chicory in it. I liked it OK.
Try Community Coffee if you can find it.
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Old 02-03-2019, 05:33 PM
 
13,887 posts, read 23,318,822 times
Reputation: 19013
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugsyPal View Post
Nearly all the popular supermarket/mass produced coffees in USA are owned by international conglomerates. Kraft owned Maxwell House for instance, but has since sold it off.



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As are most of the coffeehouse brands.
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