U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Today, 04:50 AM
Status: "Fighting stupidity, one post at a time." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Here and now.
11,750 posts, read 3,284,505 times
Reputation: 12564

Advertisements

Disclaimer: Please forgive me if this should be in another forum. It's certainly health-related, but my ultimate question is one of palatability, so I've come here because I know you all love tasty food.

I have an elderly housemate, for whom I cook. She has numerous health issues, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. She recently had a mini-stroke, and we are going to have to make some changes around here, when it comes to food.

Rant first: She tends to take an "all-or-nothing" approach to healthier eating, wanting to eliminate virtually all carbs one moment, snacking on cookies, cake, and candy the next. For example, she frets about the sugar and fat in Greek yogurt topped with fresh fruit, then has an egg and sausage biscuit for breakfast instead, and follows it up with whatever sugary snack someone has brought to the parish hall on the days she has Bible study. When she does try to change her diet, she attempts to cut out carbs altogether, and speaks dispairingly of never having pizza or pasta again.

I know what to do, and how to prepare healthy meals, and that there is probably nothing at all she must give up entirely. My question is, what are good substitutes for some of the ingredients we both love? I think the starting point needs to be dairy. Not interested in skim milk, as we both hate it, but can anyone suggest specific non-dairy milks for specific uses? One might be good on cold cereal, another might make the best creamy soup, right? I'd like to find a couple of things I can use every day, reserving some of the dairy items we don't want to sacrifice as a special treat.

Next on the list would probably be the bread/pasta thing. Can anyone suggest whole-grain breads or pastas that have a taste/texture similar to the white stuff? I'm trying to use more whole-grain blends, like pilafs, as side dishes, too, with mixed results. Also, does anyone get good results with veggie noodles?

I suspect a lot of this is going to depend on acquiring some new tastes, but any is appreciated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Today, 05:56 AM
 
3,949 posts, read 4,694,388 times
Reputation: 10278
Veggie noodles are great as veggies. They suck as noodles, IMO. When I'm craving pasta, they don't work. Instead, use gluten-free noodles -- much lower GI hit than standard pasta. If it's the flavors of the sauce you're after, then make something like sausage onion & peppers with crumbled sausage (so you can use less) and a mix of regular Italian with a chicken/turkey Italian sausage. I also do Italian sausage & sauce cooked with thinly sliced cabbage that I call cabbage marinara or Italian stew.

There are some soft whole wheat breads out there. Also, sandwich thins are a good way to reduce the amount of bread. Another way is to do lettuce wraps / lettuce cups instead of breads for sandwich fillings.

Start meals with a broth-based soup, or make it creamy with mashed cauliflower and a tiny amount of instant potatoes to fill up on healthier options.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 06:46 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
9,831 posts, read 13,717,731 times
Reputation: 21039
I have a friend who swears by cauliflower pizza crust and uses mashed cauliflower in place of mashed potatoes.
Do you think you could talk your friend into a type of 'rewards' system, telling her that if she stays on track for a week she can reward herself with a cheat day. It can be difficult to give things up entirely and it can make me crave the 'forbidden' items. Maybe she needs your help to set a goal of gradually changing her diet instead of a complete change all at once, plan it out on a calendar so she can actually 'see' what's going on?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:28 AM
 
8,576 posts, read 4,297,351 times
Reputation: 29783
Quote:
Originally Posted by weezycom View Post
Veggie noodles are great as veggies. They suck as noodles, IMO. When I'm craving pasta, they don't work. Instead, use gluten-free noodles -- much lower GI hit than standard pasta.
This is NOT true!!!

Quote:
Gluten-free diets are not inherently low-GI. In fact, gluten-free processed foods, such as breads, cookies and pasta, are typically even higher GI than their wheat-based counterparts. Most processed gluten-free foods are lower in fiber, more processed and devoid of whole grains. They are often based upon high GI white rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch and corn starch. Even those that use higher-fiber, moderate-GI raw ingredients are processed in a way that may raise their glycemic index.
Source: https://celiact.com/blogs/the-celiac...uten-free-diet , and my experience as a gluten-intolerant diabetic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:33 AM
 
8,576 posts, read 4,297,351 times
Reputation: 29783
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
I have a friend who swears by cauliflower pizza crust and uses mashed cauliflower in place of mashed potatoes.
Cauliflower pizza crusts are very tricky. You have to read labels closely. Yesterday I was looking at Trader Joe's version. They're somewhat smallish ... I'd say one could serve one or two people. I looked at the label ... 17g of carbs. Okay, not ideal, but not horrible. Then I looked at the serving size ... 1/6 of the pizza! So half a pizza, not counting sauce, cheese and toppings, is 51g of carbs!! YIKES!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:41 AM
 
4,335 posts, read 6,711,894 times
Reputation: 12790
I started down the path to better eating about 2 decades ago (was fast approaching 300lbs, bought flour and sugar in the Sams's Club 25lb sizes, monthly). *MY* path was to cut carbs (other than those found in fresh veggies) completely for a month to 'detox' and then Slowly added things back in. It worked for me... to the point where in the past I'd binge on one of those Halloween candy mix bags intended to be given out to dozens of kids, by myself, in an afternoon (Major sweet tooth issue), and now I simply don't miss the stuff. I enjoy the heck out of it when I do get some, NEVER the volume I used to eat, but I don't crave it and my life isn't ruled by it.


Anyway, I'm getting off track. My diet today, where I'm maintaining about 220lbs (I'm 6'4", and in my 50's I'm lighter than I was in high school), excludes Nothing. I've had no rebound weight gains, never did have health issues. I simply choose to eat things in moderation. This is helped by the decision to only eat the best I can make/afford, which is the main mental shift that's responsible for the major diet change. Quality over Quantity. This is sometimes referred to as "being mindful", or thinking about what you're eating/doing while in the process. I love pizza, but I'm not going to waste the calories on bad pizza. So I make my own pizza dough (takes a week of cold fermenting), my own mozzarella, grow tomatoes for my own sauce and hope to take on making dried/cured meats as a hobby (but buy from a butcher now). Total cost is less than the cheapest carry-out/delivery pizza I can get, and my pizza makes 4 "meals" (wife and I can eat pizza twice from one cooking). It's a no-holds-bared meal. Same is true for pasta, I make my own ~ fresh ~ and skimp on nothing. Only whole milk in the fridge, heavy cream used in soups, etc... I just don't eat that way all the time. I think I have pizza about once every 4~6 weeks, pasta too. The lions share of the meals I eat are simple protein and veggie, baked chicken with steamed broccoli for example. Lots of steak and sweet potatoes too, soups/chili through the cooler winter months and salads through the summer. One Small thing I did add that I enjoy now is a "vegetarian day" every week.





Long-winded way of saying that you need not eliminate anything from your diet/cooking. Just eat the "bad" meals in moderation, which is made lots easier if you get hooked on quality. And this all takes time, think about how many years were spent with poor diet choices, that have ingrained themselves. It'll take time to work those out too...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Savannah, GA
637 posts, read 365,888 times
Reputation: 497
Try Ezekiel bread; comes frozen. Plenty of healthy cooking options out there. I would suggest the Paleo Primer cook book; some great hearty and healthy recipes there. Cauliflower pizzas as mentioned above are a hit or miss. Making your own can be tricky as well. You can always use cauliflower with a bit of heavy cream instead of mashed potatoes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:47 AM
 
8,576 posts, read 4,297,351 times
Reputation: 29783
OP, if you want lower GI pastas, look into quinoa pasta. Higher protein, lower GI. But be very careful. Some quinoa pastas are labeled as such, but are still heavy on the rice or corn flours. You've got to compare the amount of carbs listed on each (taking into account whether the serving size is the same in your comparisons. You may have to do a little math).

But even if you find a lower GI pasta, it's still important to reduce the amount. I had to get used to the fact that I wouldn't be having a bowl full of penne drowned in tomato sauce as a meal. IF I have pasta, it's a side. And literally no more than a quarter of my plate. And much less sauce than I was used to.

I highly suggest your friend work with a dietician to learn how to navigate a healthy diet and not feel completely deprived. She needs to learn that it's literally impossible to cut out carbs altogether, and that shouldn't be her goal. Everyone needs carbs. Diabetics just need to learn now to reduce their intake while monitoring their glucose, and focus on healthier complex carbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:53 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,825 posts, read 43,979,614 times
Reputation: 59492
What is the goal, exactly? I have heard that a low carb diet improves both cholesterol and diabetes, so I would go with that.

Cream and whole milk, and cheese are fine on a low carb diet. So are proteins and vegetables. You just need to avoid fruit juice, sugar and white flower. I ate this way for over a year and I felt great on it. The breakfasts did me in...I couldn’t face any more eggs. I’m not much of a bread eater, even now. I like Dave’s Killer thin sliced bread. It has good whole grains and no additives and it is good. Also, a big grilled portobello mushroom is a good base for a burger.

This being said, if I’m a sick old lady who has had a stroke, I’d probably eat whatever I darn please.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 08:33 AM
Status: "Fighting stupidity, one post at a time." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Here and now.
11,750 posts, read 3,284,505 times
Reputation: 12564
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
What is the goal, exactly? I have heard that a low carb diet improves both cholesterol and diabetes, so I would go with that.

Cream and whole milk, and cheese are fine on a low carb diet. So are proteins and vegetables. You just need to avoid fruit juice, sugar and white flower. I ate this way for over a year and I felt great on it. The breakfasts did me in...I couldnít face any more eggs. Iím not much of a bread eater, even now. I like Daveís Killer thin sliced bread. It has good whole grains and no additives and it is good. Also, a big grilled portobello mushroom is a good base for a burger.

This being said, if Iím a sick old lady who has had a stroke, Iíd probably eat whatever I darn please.
The goal is to keep her blood sugar more stable and to reduce her cholesterol.

She has asked me to prepare healthier meals, it is not something I am imposing on her against her will.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top