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Old 02-11-2019, 07:02 PM
 
6,332 posts, read 3,529,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
Veal in general is on it's way out in the U.S. because most people aren't comfortable with the idea of eating animal babies.
Yeah, nobody gets omelets anymore.
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Old 02-11-2019, 07:43 PM
 
5,734 posts, read 3,262,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
Yeah, nobody gets omelets anymore.
It's a funny joke, I know, but remember that the eggs they normally sell are unfertilized. They are only chicken uteri.
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Old 02-11-2019, 08:31 PM
 
24,779 posts, read 31,908,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
I have been noticing that many Italian chain restaurants have stopped serving veal parmigiana (Olive Garden dropped it many years back, and more recently Buca di Beppo has dropped it). I'm guessing low sales and the high price of veal could be to blame. Could this be a sign that veal parmigiana could be on its way out? Veal parmigiana has historically been in the shadow of its more popular cousins eggplant parmigiana and chicken parmigiana.
I make my own. Love it.
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Old 02-11-2019, 09:26 PM
 
6,332 posts, read 3,529,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
I have been noticing that many Italian chain restaurants have stopped serving veal parmigiana (Olive Garden dropped it many years back, and more recently Buca di Beppo has dropped it). I'm guessing low sales and the high price of veal could be to blame. Could this be a sign that veal parmigiana could be on its way out? Veal parmigiana has historically been in the shadow of its more popular cousins eggplant parmigiana and chicken parmigiana.

Maybe to the young. Forty years ago there was no such thing as chicken parmigiana in an Italian restaurant. That may have begun to change with the advent of chain restaurants in the Italian food sector like those you appear to be enamored with and their strict adherence to price point created menus.

You did not mention what is probably the best chain in the Italian sector, Carrabbas, but be assured that the two Houston restaurants of that name that are not part of the Outback owned chain and are still operated by the family that established the brand have veal on their menus.
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Old 02-11-2019, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,223 posts, read 1,401,999 times
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I don't get what the beef is with veal. (hehe! Yes, I see what I did there.) I mean, veal is technically young beef. And if cows are raised on a factory farm, wouldn't veal be slightly more humane, considering how veal spends less time living in bad conditions than beef does? And gets fed better too, I'm sure.

With that said, veal is not common in Americanized Italian restaurants, whether basic or upscale. But I do see it pretty regularly in authentic Italian restaurants. Not so much in the form of parmigiana (where the meat flavor is drowned out by other components), but more often meatballs, ravioli, and stews. Presumably, in the old country, with limited grazing land and expensive feed, it was more cost-effective to not let a cow grow to adulthood. Which made veal popular.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 02-11-2019 at 10:24 PM..
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Old 02-11-2019, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
23,752 posts, read 22,706,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
Years ago after reading how the expensive pale looking veal came to be like that I never touched it again.
I read that in the 1970s and never ate it again -- except for that one bite in Germany in the 1980s. I felt sort of guilty about that, but I hadn't ordered it.

To me, veal isn't something that you'd want to put tomato sauce and cheese on.
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Old 02-11-2019, 10:27 PM
 
6,332 posts, read 3,529,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I don't get what the beef is with veal. (hehe! Yes, I see what I did there.) I mean, veal is technically young beef. And if cows are raised on a factory farm, wouldn't veal be slightly more humane, considering how veal spends less time living in bad conditions than beef does? (And it tastes pretty good too.)

With that said, veal is not common in Americanized Italian restaurants, whether basic or upscale. But I do see it pretty regularly in authentic Italian restaurants. Not so much in the form of parmigiana, but more often meatballs, ravioli, and stews. Presumably, in the old country, with limited grazing land and expensive feed, it was more cost-effective to not let a cow grow to adulthood. Which made veal popular.
Virtually all veal raised in the USA are male calves of dairy cows. Since the cows must be bred regularly to keep up milk production almost all the male offspring are sent to veal production with a small number kept for breeding purposes. They are not genetically disposed to produce large amounts of high quality beef like an angus would be, for instance but make good veal. The females remain in the dairy industry.
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:57 AM
 
470 posts, read 86,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
Maybe people are more aware now of the cruelty involved with veal. And that's a good thing.

I saw a documentary a long time ago on how veal was created, and even though Iím not vegetarian, I was never able to eat veal again.
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Old 02-12-2019, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,223 posts, read 1,401,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happygrrrl View Post
I saw a documentary a long time ago on how veal was created, and even though I’m not vegetarian, I was never able to eat veal again.
Most factory-farmed animals are raised in inhumane conditions, no doubt. But how is veal cruelty worse than beef cruelty? It's the same animal, similarly raised. If it's because the animal is younger, it actually spends less time living in those conditions.
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Old 02-12-2019, 07:23 AM
 
20,685 posts, read 29,206,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redplum33 View Post
Yes, I read the whole thread.

I also read the New York Times article that you linked. Did you actually read that article? If so, I'm assuming you must have missed this part:

"A few other small veal farms use this method, also called pasture-raised, but Strauss is the only major player. It produces about 5 percent of its veal this way."

So, 5% is produced humanely while 95% is still produced inhumanely.

I'll pass. Thanks.
So you'll pass on supporting the 5% who are in order to punish the 95% who aren't? Great policy!
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