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Old Yesterday, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Austin
11,408 posts, read 6,528,908 times
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You all have been very helpful. Off to the store today to buy some of your suggestions and a cookbook.

an indian cookbook is a great idea, NYC refugee. adding indian spices to my meager spice options may shake up our taste buds. we love vegetables, but monotonous recipes have been wearing thin.

thank you, all.
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Old Yesterday, 06:18 AM
 
693 posts, read 547,365 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texan2yankee View Post
You all have been very helpful. Off to the store today to buy some of your suggestions and a cookbook.

an indian cookbook is a great idea, NYC refugee. adding indian spices to my meager spice options may shake up our taste buds. we love vegetables, but monotonous recipes have been wearing thin.

thank you, all.
If you use Indian spices, start with "Kitchen King". It is more flavorful with hint of garlic and onion. "Garam masala" does not have these two.
Both these spices come prepackaged. Buy either of MDH or Everest brands.
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Old Yesterday, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
432 posts, read 147,533 times
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You can do tons of stuff with zucchini or cauliflower. I make a cauliflower almond "alfredo" type sauce by steaming and then blending cauliflower with blanched almonds (or use cashews) and milk or even vegetable broth. I add marjoram, garlic powder, salt and pepper to it. Comes out very thick and creamy. You could add parmesan to this before blending also. I eat this over sweet potatoes or squash.

Zucchini can be spirilized into noodles and eaten with peanut butter Thai sauce or tahini dressing.

I also love jicama which I discovered a few years ago. It's a starchy kind of root vegetable you can slice and eat raw. I dip it in hummus for a snack or with raw broccoli, carrots, cherry tomatoes all dipped in hummus for a lunch. My lunch portion is two to three cups raw veggies and 1/2 cup hummus. I'm a big veggie eater so my stomach can handle that much raw veggies lol.

And soup! I love to puree carrots and white beans for a thick creamy carrot ginger soup. Or I make a fajita chunky veggie bean soup type deal.
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Old Yesterday, 07:47 AM
 
52 posts, read 9,141 times
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Acorn squash. Split in half, remove seeds, add a tablespoon of butter and a tablespoon of brown sugar, and bake at 400F for 30 minutes or so.


Root vegetables like turnips, beets, rutabaggers, sweet potatoes, daikon radish. Slice into 1/4" thick, toss in large bowl with a drizzle of olive oil and salt/pepper, and bake at 400F for 20 minutes or so.


Thick slice of tomato with a thin slice of mozzarella cheese on top, grill until cheese turns slightly brown and bubbly.


Give spinach a quick boil, compress to squeeze out water, serve with roasted sesame dressing (Kewpie brand at most Asian stores).


Most stores carry S&B curry blocks. Make with carrot, celery, potato, onion, turnip, and apple.
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Old Yesterday, 08:03 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,296 posts, read 10,369,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texan2yankee View Post
we eat the same vegetables all the time. variety of squashes, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, broccoli, green beans, asparagus, cabbage, onion, peppers of various colors and carrots. very occasionally we have peas, artichoke, corn, bok choy, and variety of potatoes.

I notice you don't have some bitter or other alternative flavor vegetables such as radishes, arugula, fennel, radicchio, escarole, endives, turnips, kale, beets, though brussels sprouts fit nicely into that list as well.

[I see now that poster #10 beat me to some of these on the above list]

As for red, orange and yellow peppers, my preferred method is simply to leave them in the sun's radiant heat for several hours (could be through a plastic bag) and eat them as is; in my experience, not worth the rigmarole to roast and peel.

Just a quibble, I would consider peas and green beans as legumes, and corn and potatoes as carbohydrates alongside rice, wheat, etc.

Either way, in that vein, you might add yucca or other tubers to your rotation; as for legumes, lentils, chickpeas, and cannelloni beans.

Just some suggestions.

Hope this helps!
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Old Yesterday, 08:04 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,886 posts, read 44,036,847 times
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I love roasted beets. Peel and cube a yellow and a red beet, drizzle with olive oil and salt. Bake until tender and browned. Sometimes I do the same things with parsnips and carrots.
Otherwise, you already use more veggies that I do.

Last edited by gentlearts; Yesterday at 08:15 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 09:25 AM
 
35,715 posts, read 13,649,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I love roasted beets. Peel and cube a yellow and a red beet, drizzle with olive oil and salt. Bake until tender and browned. Sometimes I do the same things with parsnips and carrots.
Otherwise, you already use more veggies that I do.
Love roasted beats with goat cheese and walnuts, drizzled with balsamic vinegar, served over lettuce.

Salad as a Meal by Patricia Wells has some great ideas on meals with more vegetables.

Use all sorts of vegetables, bok choy, etc. in Thai curry. Massaman and green curry are our favorites. Buy the spice mixture. Stir a couple tablespoon in a can of coconut milk and a can of water, along with a tablespoon of good fish sauce. Add chunks of stir fried onions, sweet potato, carrot, celery, ... anything on hand. Serve over brown rice, cauliflower rice, or spiralized zucchini.

Starting to read about the benefits of bitter greens.
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Old Yesterday, 09:37 AM
 
5,715 posts, read 3,253,245 times
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A couple more ideas inspired by the latest posts -

The "Moosewood Cookbook" is a classic and has interesting vegetable recipes.

Zucchini boats. Parboil zucchini sliced lengthwise and scoop out seed portion. Stuff with a mixture of minced onions, bread crumbs, egg and seasoning. Top with cheese and finish in the oven. If you add fried Italian sausage or bacon to the stuffing you have a whole meal dish.
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Old Yesterday, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
20,240 posts, read 13,287,924 times
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I agree about the leafy greens. I rely on them in the winter. Last night I braised a mix of kale, mustard and spinach. I topped it with a chopped boiled egg.

I think you are already eating a variety of veggies. If you are getting tired of things, it might do to learn a new recipe or two.

Another way to put veggies in people’s mouths is to add them to dishes like chili. I add chopped onions, green peppers and chopped celery routinely in my chili. If you prefer a pork or beef stew, you can add potatoes, onions, carrots and celery.

By the way, roasted Brussels sprouts and sweet potatoes are yummy together. And I really like brown rice and broccoli paired together. I also like a winter caprese made with cherry tomatoes and mozzarella balls. You can find fresh basil in the grocer year round. Feel free to add sweet onion crescents, and anything else that sounds good.

Many, many times I stuff a green salad with a variety of fresh veggies, and don’t make a side.
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Old Yesterday, 09:50 AM
 
11,126 posts, read 5,390,422 times
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I also think you should add mushrooms to your vegetables, superfood. There are 4 kinds that I’ve found regularly in my supermarket, shiitake, oyster, brown, white, and portobello(large brown), you can sauté them with butter and parsley. Shiitake can be used and sautéed with other Asian vegetables.
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