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Old 03-01-2019, 11:55 PM
 
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Does French cuisines not utilize high heat?

I eat at this nice french bistro, and they dont have the big gas range. Instead they have hot plates/table top electric burner. I find that strange. Hot plates/table top electric burners cannot get that hot. How do the French cook their steak frites, or steak au poivre without high heat? How do they seal and sear?
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Old 03-02-2019, 05:20 AM
 
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An electric burner can get plenty hot, certainly enough to sear a steak and frites are deep fried so they wouldn't be involved in either apparatus mentioned.
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Old 03-08-2019, 02:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
An electric burner can get plenty hot, certainly enough to sear a steak and frites are deep fried so they wouldn't be involved in either apparatus mentioned.
I am told the steak house get in excess of 800F on broilers and grills. Can hot plates, and electric burners get that hot?
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Old 03-08-2019, 04:14 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Does French cuisines not utilize high heat?

I eat at this nice french bistro, and they dont have the big gas range. Instead they have hot plates/table top electric burner. I find that strange. Hot plates/table top electric burners cannot get that hot. How do the French cook their steak frites, or steak au poivre without high heat? How do they seal and sear?
Did you visit the "French bistro" with hot plates in France??
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Old 03-08-2019, 04:18 PM
 
Location: On the sunny side of a mountain
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It may be an induction burner and not a hot plate but never the less not everything needs to be cooked at 800F to get a good sear. I have no problem searing on a regular residential gas or electric stove. They could be keeping a pot of hot oil on an induction burner for temperature regulation for the frites if they have them on the menu.
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Old 03-09-2019, 12:02 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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One of the most widely known French techniques, even to people who don't cook much, is a high-heat technique, the sauté .

That said, in general, and compared to many other world cuisines, a lot of classic French dishes are indeed low-heat. Casseroles, stews, baked and braised dishes, etc.
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Old 03-10-2019, 09:25 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
One of the most widely known French techniques, even to people who don't cook much, is a high-heat technique, the sauté .

That said, in general, and compared to many other world cuisines, a lot of classic French dishes are indeed low-heat. Casseroles, stews, baked and braised dishes, etc.
If it is for stews with meat or braising, I always brown it on high heat.
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Old 03-11-2019, 12:32 AM
 
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Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Did you visit the "French bistro" with hot plates in France??
No I never been to France. But the French cuisine restaurants I visited in States is owned and run by authentic French people. Unless they are really good actors with great accents.
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Old 03-11-2019, 12:33 AM
 
5,817 posts, read 6,040,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
One of the most widely known French techniques, even to people who don't cook much, is a high-heat technique, the sauté .

That said, in general, and compared to many other world cuisines, a lot of classic French dishes are indeed low-heat. Casseroles, stews, baked and braised dishes, etc.
Saute does not necessarily have to be highest possible heat though.
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Old 03-11-2019, 04:53 AM
 
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Stick your finger in that sauté pan and let me know if it's high heat or not.
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