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Old 03-03-2019, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
10,099 posts, read 3,451,928 times
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Do you enjoy visiting a restaurant or hotel just for the history.

The Grand Plaza in NYC for instance or places where historic figures have dined.

In terms of London, here is ten of the most historic where everyone from Samuel Pepys to Charles Dickens and H.G Wells through to Hollywood Stars and World leaders have eaten.

These are London's oldest restaurants | Gentleman's Journal

Rules Restaurant | Covent Garden

Simpson's in the Strand | Covent Garden

Simpsons Tavern: Homepage

Wiltons - London

Wheeler's of St. James's

Sweetings Restaurant – Fish & Seafood Restaurant - London

Kettner's Townhouse | Hotel, Restaurant and Bar in Soho, London

The Ivy West Street, London

Gordons Wine Bar

Savini At Criterion

Churchill's favourite haunts included the Rivoli Bar at the Ritz as well as Claridges and the Savoy.

The Rivoli Bar & Cocktail Lounge in Mayfair | The Ritz London Hotel

London's Most Historic Hotels | Londonist

Hotels in London - List of Five-Star Hotels in London

In terms of the Queen, she likes to dine at the Roux brothers Waterside Inn near Windsor and Bellamy's in Mayfair.

London Restaurants Frequented by the Royal Family | Food & Drink

Princess Diana's favourite restaurants in London - Stylist

The Waterside Inn, Bray

Bellamy's Restaurant - French brasserie restaurant - Mayfair, London

Post your historic restaurants or restaurants where Hollywood stars ate at in the US.

Last edited by Brave New World; 03-03-2019 at 10:36 AM..
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Old 03-03-2019, 11:43 AM
 
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I went to Raffles Bar in Singapore and had a Singapore Sling. I confess to going in the Cheers Bar in Boston a few times with friends for god knows what reason. I went to the Peking Gourmet in Falls Church that has all the signed photos of famous politicians and celebrities on the walls for Peking Duck.


For dining, I typically pay attention to food/service/decor ratings and ignore the history of the place. Hotels are the same way.
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Old 03-03-2019, 11:57 AM
 
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Went to Musso and Frank’s in LA a few years ago. Food was basic, old fashioned in style but not bad; it’s considered an example of a classic turn-of-the-last-century New York steakhouse style bar and restaurant. Opened in 1919, and probably the oldest continually operating restaurant in the city.

There were two extremely old eateries in Boston, both of which I’ve been to. The Union Oyster House opened in 1826, and it’s unfortunately lousy. The good place of this type, Durgin-Park, which opened in 1827, sadly just closed about a month ago or so; food was actually very good there. These were the last bastions of classic New England style comfort food (yankee pot roast, prime rib, baked scrod, slow-baked beans in the crock, Indian pudding with ice cream, coffee jello) left from the old days. Too bad the good one closed.

Have also been to Antoine’s in New Orleans, which opened in 1840 and is probably NOLA’s oldest eatery. Food was just okay, wasn’t especially impressed. Best part was trout almondine, which was fresh and basic. Their signature oysters Rockefeller was meh.

But I’m not interested in going to an old restaurant just for the history. I go for the food, if I go.
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Old 03-03-2019, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
3,504 posts, read 1,957,169 times
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Originally Posted by bachslunch View Post
Went to Musso and Frankís in LA a few years ago. Food was basic, old fashioned in style but not bad; itís considered an example of a classic turn-of-the-last-century New York steakhouse style bar and restaurant. Opened in 1919, and probably the oldest continually operating restaurant in the city.

There were two extremely old eateries in Boston, both of which Iíve been to. The Union Oyster House opened in 1826, and itís unfortunately lousy. The good place of this type, Durgin-Park, which opened in 1827, sadly just closed about a month ago or so; food was actually very good there. These were the last bastions of classic New England style comfort food (yankee pot roast, prime rib, baked scrod, slow-baked beans in the crock, Indian pudding with ice cream, coffee jello) left from the old days. Too bad the good one closed.

Have also been to Antoineís in New Orleans, which opened in 1840 and is probably NOLAís oldest eatery. Food was just okay, wasnít especially impressed. Best part was trout almondine, which was fresh and basic. Their signature oysters Rockefeller was meh.

But Iím not interested in going to an old restaurant just for the history. I go for the food, if I go.
We went to Durgin Park for Thanksgiving this year. I had the schrod and the Indian pudding. My twelve year old had a massive nose bleed, it was a bitterly cold day and he is prone to them, and bled all over the floor. We now tell him It is all his fault they had to close, he cursed the place. It really is a shame they closed down.
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Old 03-03-2019, 12:54 PM
 
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This is my favorite historic MN restaurant:

https://www.hubbellhouserestaurant.com/

It's a classic old supper club type restaurant near Rochester, MN. At one time it was a stage coach stop and lodging. Built in 1854 before MN became a state.

One fun thing they have on their menu is an appetizer meal of your choices. If you don't include at least one order of their lacy, crispy onion rings you'll be missing out. It's worth a drive just for those.

If visiting take time to look at the guest book and you will see many famous names both past and present including the Brothers Mayo.

I've never had a bad meal or poor service here. They are studied professionals. The family which owns it came from Greece at the turn of the last century and each generation has made their mark with excellent and beloved restaurants.
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Old 03-03-2019, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,398 posts, read 26,077,107 times
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This question brings me back a few (!!!) years. For my 16th birthday, my Dad took me to New York for 4 days of Broadway plays (42nd Street, Annie, and Woman of the Year when Lauren Bacall was still in it), shopping (omg, my poor Dad), and restaurants. We stayed at the Waldorf Astoria. We ate at a few great places but the one that I was most excited about was Sardi's, which I enjoyed that much more because we went after seeing Woman of the Year... and so did Lauren Bacall. She was a few tables over from us and I was starstruck.
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Old 03-03-2019, 04:31 PM
 
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I went to the real Soup Nazi place in NYC in the late 90s but it was closed for renovations that day.
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Old 03-03-2019, 05:18 PM
 
5,808 posts, read 3,298,359 times
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Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
This question brings me back a few (!!!) years. For my 16th birthday, my Dad took me to New York for 4 days of Broadway plays (42nd Street, Annie, and Woman of the Year when Lauren Bacall was still in it), shopping (omg, my poor Dad), and restaurants. We stayed at the Waldorf Astoria. We ate at a few great places but the one that I was most excited about was Sardi's, which I enjoyed that much more because we went after seeing Woman of the Year... and so did Lauren Bacall. She was a few tables over from us and I was starstruck.
What a thrilling sixteenth birthday party! I just looked at all the food pictures on the Sardi's site. Wow!

Oh, uh, and Lauren Bacall, too.
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Old 03-03-2019, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,398 posts, read 26,077,107 times
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Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
What a thrilling sixteenth birthday party! I just looked at all the food pictures on the Sardi's site. Wow!

Oh, uh, and Lauren Bacall, too.
Thank you. It's a lovely memory of my Dad. We had such a great time. Oh, uh, and Lauren Bacall, too.
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Old 03-03-2019, 05:45 PM
 
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I had no idea Durgin Park had closed. I've been there a few times on family trips to Boston. The food wasn't as memorable as the surroundings, but I thought it would always be there.

Peter Luger's in Brooklyn, and The Old '76 House in Tappan NY are certainly historic restaurants, they also have excellent food.
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