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Old 05-08-2019, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grampaTom View Post
Young poke greens were a frequently eaten in our home years ago. I have eaten dandelion (leaves and flowers) in salads. I also eat clover flowers in salads. When I could get it we also had watercress for our salad.
I've never considered eating clover flowers. I have plenty of them.
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,390 posts, read 23,391,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
I ate pigweed and spiny lettuce over the weekend and I eat mulberries in the summer and crab apples in fall. In the summer I'm probably going to eat mugwort that grows behind the projects. Do you guys mess with polk weed or nah? I heard you have to boil it multiple times.
You eat polk when it's young. By the time that the plants are large, they'll likely kill you.
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:41 AM
Status: "Freedom - Diversity - Unity" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Mars City
5,060 posts, read 2,030,529 times
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Dandelion greens in salads. Dandelion root tea. I'm sure there are many other possibilities too.

People are truer "weeds" than anything growing in nature.
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:50 AM
 
1,613 posts, read 665,133 times
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My favorite dish from growing up is Minestra.
it is usually a mix of greens. Escarole, Chicory, Broccoli greens, Borage. or sometimes just a couple of those.
It is served on top of a cornmeal patty, or sometimes chopped up inside the dish.

There is usually a piece of pork in the mix as well. Ham hock, sausage, or sometimes ribs.
It's real southern italian food. and it's quite delicious.
My friends wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole. But they were eating Chef Boy RD
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Old 05-08-2019, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Illinois
188 posts, read 42,655 times
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My father and my Italian grandmother introduced me to many wild growing things that my friends knew only as weeds. Each one of them was tasty in their own right. We picked dandelion greens for salad, chicory or Italian dandelions for soups and salads, wild asparagus, purslane, sorrel, chickweed, and my favorite cardones or wild cocklebur stalks, which she boiled until tender, then battered with egg and seasoned breadcrumbs and fried in garlicky olive oil. Foraging at its finest!
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Old 05-08-2019, 05:24 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,202 posts, read 14,071,103 times
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Where do you people forage? I've had various weeds as a kid when we had acreage, but nowadays I'm too afraid of the runoff from other peoples yards (uphill from me) to even consider picking anything from my own yard.
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Illinois
188 posts, read 42,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Where do you people forage? I've had various weeds as a kid when we had acreage, but nowadays I'm too afraid of the runoff from other peoples yards (uphill from me) to even consider picking anything from my own yard.
You bring up a good point with everybody gone Roundup Crazy! My family had a couple acres outside town with fruit trees and a large garden, the rest was wild which is where some of our foraging took place, my dad would ask farmers for permission to pick whatever was in season on their land. Today, you have to be careful!
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,390 posts, read 23,391,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Where do you people forage? I've had various weeds as a kid when we had acreage, but nowadays I'm too afraid of the runoff from other peoples yards (uphill from me) to even consider picking anything from my own yard.
I once met a woman picking mushrooms in a nature, natural, recreation area. This one: https://uncoveringpa.com/hiking-seve...a-wilkes-barre. We walked, talked, and I picked mushrooms. She didn't know the English name for them because she was from Russia.
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Old Yesterday, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Gallup, NM
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My family eats "weeds," but we don't think of it like that. To us, the earth is our mother, and she provides for her children. When I was small, my parents used to drop me off at my grandparents' home, and I'd spend each summer with them. My grandma taught me the names and use for many plants. Some are medicines. Others are food. There's even a classification for poisonous plants. There's a fourth classification for ceremonial plants (plants used in religious ceremonies for healing purposes).

I do not really know the names of these plants in English. I can describe some of them. There's a flower that has thin roots with occasional potato like bulbs. It has a sweet taste. If you eat too much, it gives you diarrhea. There are these things we call wild carrots. The white roots look like carrots when you dig them out, but the texture is spongy and watery. When you eat it, it's crunchy with a slightly sweet taste. What the Americans call Quinoa, we call Food Of The Gods. It too gives you a stomach ache, so we make cakes of it mixed with a white clay that helps with digestion. We also used to dig out wild onions. You have to be careful because there's another plant that resembles and tastes like wild onions except that this other plant is poisonous. If you eat it, your mouth starts frothing, and you start hallucinating before your heart stops. Only medicine men know the antidote or cure for this. In times of war, men made arrow poison with this. Then there's a fruit that ripens in the desert. You start a fire and bake the fruit in the ashes. It looks like jelly or molasses, and you can shape and dry it. When you eat it, it's very sweet. You can add this to your blue corn cereal (something like grits but without butter or salt). Then there are the grasses. Different plants produce small grass seeds that you can gather and grind into a flour or meal. You can make a porridge out of it, or you can shape them into cakes and bake in the ashes. Oh, I also recall another plant we used to call crayons. When you dig the root out, it has a deep yellow color. While the root is fresh, you can use it to draw pictures or color your coloring book. When it dries, the women boil it and use it to dye their wool (for weaving blankets). One of my elders once told me that that same plant is used to cure infertility in women. I didn't ask him how it's administered. But yeah, those are just some examples of how we use and eat "weeds."
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Old Yesterday, 09:04 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,459 posts, read 22,916,443 times
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Dandelion, sorrel, rocket greens and ramps. I think that bitter greens are a good tonic in spring.
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