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Old 08-05-2019, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Austin
12,369 posts, read 7,043,170 times
Reputation: 13702

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My recipe for rib roast:

Kosher salt and ground pepper the roast. Let roast sit on counter to achieve room temp.

Put roast rib side down on broiling pan.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cook for 15 minutes at 375 degrees on middle rack. Turn down oven to 325 degrees and cook for 15 minutes a pound.

Remove roast from oven and let it sit for 5 minutes. Slice and serve with horseradish.

We like our meat rare. Your mileage (and oven) may vary.

Last edited by texan2yankee; 08-05-2019 at 04:23 PM..
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Old 08-05-2019, 05:28 PM
 
1,148 posts, read 766,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
Someone on CD Food suggested this link - worked perfect from the first go. The linked recipe for Yorkshire pudding was the same - perfect from the first time.

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...ef-recipe.html
^^^THIS! Low and slow until the internal temp is 125-128. My oven won't go down to 150, but this recipe works just as well at 250. Let it rest tented. Blast it at the end for the crispy crust. Anything beyond medium rare and my mom says we can't be friends.

And make your own fresh horseradish sauce!
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Old 08-05-2019, 05:33 PM
 
699 posts, read 208,711 times
Reputation: 2546
"Nothing is so idiot-proof that it can't be overcome by a sufficiently motivated idiot"

Author unknown
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Old 08-05-2019, 06:34 PM
 
4,871 posts, read 4,120,141 times
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First it's important to know what temps you are dealingg with. Get a hanging oven thermometer to leave in your oven to check the real temperature-- some ovens have really inaccurate temp settings. Get a digital meat thermometer.


Pick someone's instructions & try them out using above thermometers.
*I use a convection oven, so unless you have one I won't post cooking instructions.

Do practice with choice grade before you spring for prime grade.

I just season with fresh ground sea salt & pepper. Some people do wet prime rib roast to good effect, so they can use lower grade roast & not end up with shoe leather.
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Old 08-05-2019, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Redwood Shores, CA
131 posts, read 36,154 times
Reputation: 120
Thank you for all the recipes. This is on.

Anticipating doing it a few times to get perfection, I want to start with a smallest possible piece of meat first. What is the smallest I can roast, and still approximate the process for a piece to serve 6?

Thought of other questions, let me summarize all:

1. minimal size to roast

2. is there a more accurate gauge of amount of salt to use? many recipes are vague about this.

3. is there a thermometer that can stay in the meat and in the oven? seems this can offer extra insurance. if so, what is this called?

4. is there simple au jus recipe that produces the thin liquid type of sauce (as opposed to the gravy type). thank you very much.

Last edited by RobertFisher; 08-05-2019 at 10:13 PM..
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Old 08-06-2019, 07:29 AM
 
340 posts, read 92,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertFisher View Post
Thank you for all the recipes. This is on.

Anticipating doing it a few times to get perfection, I want to start with a smallest possible piece of meat first. What is the smallest I can roast, and still approximate the process for a piece to serve 6?

Thought of other questions, let me summarize all:

1. minimal size to roast

2. is there a more accurate gauge of amount of salt to use? many recipes are vague about this.

3. is there a thermometer that can stay in the meat and in the oven? seems this can offer extra insurance. if so, what is this called?

4. is there simple au jus recipe that produces the thin liquid type of sauce (as opposed to the gravy type). thank you very much.
1. Are you buying a standing rib roast with bone on (the butcher can cut the bones off and then re-wrap them back on)? More taste that way, and I usually budget 1 bone (and the corresponding meat) per person, which would include some leftovers.

Use the bones to make beef soup for later.

2. I'd just go with a liberal covering of whatever seasoning you want - the salt is not going to permeate the whole cut anyway.

3. Lots of choices; this is what I've been using with great success. I can even sit on the couch with the remote and monitor both the oven temp and the internal meat temp without having to get up every 10 minutes.
https://www.amazon.com/Maverick-732-...gateway&sr=8-6
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Old 08-10-2019, 04:04 PM
 
1,170 posts, read 630,901 times
Reputation: 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertFisher View Post
At about $50 for a person just for the meat alone, it's getting too expensive to eat prime rib at restaurants for a family of 6. I want to try roasting myself at home.

I know it will take a few tries to get successful results. Does anyone have a proven home recipe for me to start trying?

What is the minimal size i can try with?
Love prime rib. The only thing I've noticed consistently about beef rib roast is the bigger it is, the better it seems to cook. Go kinda big.
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Old 08-11-2019, 05:17 PM
 
826 posts, read 465,835 times
Reputation: 760
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curly Q. Bobalink View Post
"Nothing is so idiot-proof that it can't be overcome by a sufficiently motivated idiot"

Author unknown
nice.

Prime rib isn't particularly hard to make. Trekker has good comments regarding the internal temp, take note. make sure not to overcook. The real question (IMO) is why people think prime rib is so great. The pieces I like are the trimmings and fatty outside cuttings, that's where all the flavor is. Slap ribeyes on everyone's plate instead. hahaha
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Old 08-14-2019, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Redwood Shores, CA
131 posts, read 36,154 times
Reputation: 120
Today is the day folks.

Bought a piece of Choice grade rib at Costco; about 4 lbs, at $11 per lb. Had to find it at Costco because my local supermarket only sells rib steaks, no rib roast. And even Costco did not have bone in, so it is just a piece of meat,

Question - with no bones in, do I need to:

1. put meat on a rack in a pan?

2. somehow tie it up?

Will post some pics shortly.
https://s7d5.turboimg.net/sp/a7c9e35...1108306960.jpg

Last edited by RobertFisher; 08-14-2019 at 07:46 AM..
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Old 08-14-2019, 07:36 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
1,288 posts, read 328,329 times
Reputation: 3083
Bone in or bone out, I used the same method I mentioned. Personally I like it better bone in.
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