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Old Today, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,406 posts, read 12,608,124 times
Reputation: 19702

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We hosted breakfast yesterday, waffles and topping. I mentioned to one of the guests that we had bacon bits to top the waffle, and her reaction was, "Ew." When I explained they were homemade bacon bits, she grew curious. She ended up eating half a bowl of the things.

So here's the story. A local market sells big packages (5 lbs?) of Falls Brand bacon ends and pieces, the scrap left over that won't make pretty strips. It's cheaper than regular bacon, so I have used it to flavor dishes that call for bacon. I fried some up and observed that the rendered fat almost covered the bacon.

A month or so ago I decided to fry up a whole package. It's densely vacuum packed, so I peeled the plastic off and thin sliced it, then put it in a 5 qt. Magnalite cast aluminum pot on medium, with the lid on. The only cooking directions are don't let it get too hot and stir it once in a while. When enough grease renders out of the bacon, keep the temperature just warm enough that it keeps bubbling. I don't know what a thermometer would read. Maybe 300-350?

I have mentioned here before that a good way to cook bacon is to deep fry it. I got the "Ew," response. I get that a lot. This is what I was talking about. Deep frying most foods adds a lot of fat, but deep frying bacon removes a lot of fat. The fat portions get crispy, and the meat portions get brown.

When it is cooked enough to suit you, fish the bacon bits out with a slotted spoon and put them on paper towels to cool and drip. When they are cool, bag them up in a ziploc baggie and refrigerate. I have never had them go bad in the meat drawer, even after 3 weeks of storage. To use, spread some on a microwave safe plate and nuke them for 30 seconds. They do a pretty good imitation of fresh cooked bacon, though they tend to be a little chewy. If you plan to put them in an omelette, you might pre-chew a little with a chef's knife to make the omelette a little less lumpy. I would also mince them before heating if they were going to be used to top a salad. They seem to soften up nicely in the sauce if you are making a casserole.

The bowl my guest noshed on was just bits and pieces from 1/4" to 1/2", just like they came out of the deep fryer.
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Old Today, 12:15 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
40,384 posts, read 3,066,341 times
Reputation: 13219
sounds delicious. I will try it.
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Old Today, 12:27 PM
 
87 posts, read 8,681 times
Reputation: 153
A chef on TV grinds bacon, then blends/mixes 50% bacon and 50% ground beef .
He says the demand for his bacon burger is huge.

I don't know if Larry Caldwell's bocon bits could work there also
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Old Today, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,406 posts, read 12,608,124 times
Reputation: 19702
Quote:
Originally Posted by SterkIjon View Post
A chef on TV grinds bacon, then blends/mixes 50% bacon and 50% ground beef .
He says the demand for his bacon burger is huge.

I don't know if Larry Caldwell's bocon bits could work there also
I'll try it. By coincidence, I just pulled a pound of burger out of the freezer yesterday.

I should also have mentioned that if you don't burn the bacon fat, you can filter some through a screen into a clean jelly jar and use it for cooking. Another of my quick and dirty breakfasts is an egg sandwich. A little bacon grease in the pan adds a lot to an egg.

I should probably mention that my cholesterol level hovers around 125, and the only dietary advice my doc gives me is to eat more fish. We made a Captain's Plate of halibut, shrimp and scallops last night, with a fresh green salad garnished with balsamic vinegar and caviar. Doctor's orders, don't ya know? It's great to be epicurean and virtuous at the same time.
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Old Today, 12:57 PM
 
87 posts, read 8,681 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
I'll try it. By coincidence, I just pulled a pound of burger out of the freezer yesterday.

I should also have mentioned that if you don't burn the bacon fat, you can filter some through a screen into a clean jelly jar and use it for cooking. Another of my quick and dirty breakfasts is an egg sandwich. A little bacon grease in the pan adds a lot to an egg.

I should probably mention that my cholesterol level hovers around 125, and the only dietary advice my doc gives me is to eat more fish. We made a Captain's Plate of halibut, shrimp and scallops last night, with a fresh green salad garnished with balsamic vinegar and caviar. Doctor's orders, don't ya know? It's great to be epicurean and virtuous at the same time.
Your last paragraph made my mouth water ( all except the caviar )
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Old Today, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,406 posts, read 12,608,124 times
Reputation: 19702
Quote:
Originally Posted by SterkIjon View Post
Your last paragraph made my mouth water ( all except the caviar )
I'm not talking crackers loaded with the stuff, I'm talking a light sprinkle, maybe a tsp over a large tossed salad. Think of it like fresh ground pepper. You wouldn't take a mouth full of the stuff, but a light grind over a salad can be delightful. As a main dish, caviar doesn't have much to recommend it, but it works well as a seasoning, particularly in combo with a seafood dinner. Toss it in with the salad so the eggs are distributed on the leaves. Don't use enough to overwhelm the fresh vegetable flavor.

BTW, I'm not talking Beluga here, just the lumpfish caviar you buy next to the canned tuna at the grocery store.
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