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Old 09-06-2019, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grampaTom View Post
We prefer sirloin for if using beef but we like shrimp, chicken or pork stir-fry better.

Oddly, I recently saw that baking powder tip on a recipe website. I thought it must be a misprint.
I would be inclined to agree with you. I do not use any beef for stir fry but my thought on the subject was more thinking in terms of dishes like beef and broccoli or other Asian beef dishes> maybe just beef without the veggies, just stir fried alone.
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Old 09-06-2019, 03:51 PM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
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growing up, my parents used flank stank. Later I learned that chinese restaurants use baking soda (yep, the stuff you use to deodorize your fridge) as a tenderizer for cheaper cuts, but it leaves a weird slipperiness to the meat. Just a pinch will be sufficient to tenderize about 1 lb of meat.
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Old 09-06-2019, 10:04 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
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We use flank steak or sirloin.
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Old 09-06-2019, 10:13 PM
 
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I use well trimmed chuck steak.
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Old 09-06-2019, 10:14 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
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The most lean and tender beef cuts: such as sirloin, tri-tip, ribeye, top loin (strip), tenderloin, shoulder center, shoulder tender, and shoulder top blade. Stir-fry is a quick kind of cooking. Any other meat will be just tough.
Cut against the grain, and you shorten the muscle fibers, effectively tenderizing the meat. The goal with any stir-fry is to cut the food into bite-size pieces that will cook rapidly and remain tender.
If you want your stir-fry Chinese style, you should velvet it by marinating small pieces of meat in a mixture of cornstarch, rice wine, egg whites, salt, sugar and sometimes soy sauce for about 30-45 minutes.
A highly effective technique is using baking soda.
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Old 09-07-2019, 01:33 AM
 
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Flank
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Old 09-07-2019, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Sometimes sirloin, sometimes chuck eye. My mother used to use flank steak, way back when that was a cheap cut. All have good flavor, but obviously the sirloin is most tender. I have tried it with top round, which I didnít think had as much flavor.

Chinese and Mexican restaurants sometimes use skirt or flap steak for stir-fried dishes, sometimes sirloin or even tenderloin in cubes.

I often lightly coat strips or cubes with dry cornstarch OR a thin paste of cornstarch with water and cooking sherry. Sear the meat and the coating seals in the juices.

For a tough cut of beef, I would marinate first, pat off any excess marinade, then coat it.
My mother used flank steak as well. My inner cheapskate nature refused to buy flank steak or beef tenderloin - or brisket, for that matter.

Yes on the flap steak. When we lived in Mexico, it was widely used - even the entire steak. I've rarely seen it here, and again it's overpriced.

I do the cornstarch thing with chicken (velveting). Never thought to do it with pork or beef. Interesting idea.
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Old 09-07-2019, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I use just about any cut of beef or pork, and tenderize using a trick that a learned from a TV chef that passed away back in the 1980s: Baking Powder


I always marinate the meat for stir-fry anyway, and adding about a tablespoon of baking powder per pound to the marinate will tenderize it (from the baking soda in it). I will marinate for at least 1/2 hour, but mostly an hour. You could do the same with baking soda, but it will take less of it, and it adds saltiness which can become too much when mixed with soy sauce.
Hmm. You're not The only one. https://www.cooksillustrated.com/art...tir-fried-beef. (Though serious ways recommends the more common cornstarch and egg white method.)

Does this work for other meats?
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Old 09-07-2019, 08:59 AM
 
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Cornstarch works as a sealant with pork and chicken as well as beef.
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Old 09-07-2019, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Phoenix,Arizona
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I use the ' Beef Stewing ' chunks from Costco I think it's a 5lb package

When I get home I fill a Zip-Lock Quart bags half full it's perfect for two people.

I'll take one out of the freezer stand it up in the sink and add about 10 good shots
of quality Soy Sauce and 5 of Worcester Sauce push the air out and reseal.
then as it's thawing, I'll squish it all around.

When it's almost thawed I will take the meat out and place them on a plate
with paper towel and dis-guard the the bag.

By the time I get done chopping the veggies it's usually ready to go
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