U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-26-2017, 12:06 AM
 
Location: So Cal
14,084 posts, read 10,322,409 times
Reputation: 12565

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by andthentherewere3 View Post
As I sat here thinking of how best to explain the pros and cons of various oils, I decided it would be easiest to post a link. One thing about canola oil though, it is said to be healthy, but it has been genetically modified. There are studies that suggest all sorts of health issues are possible from consuming genetically modified foods. However, you will already be eating genetically modified foods on a daily basis, since most corn/soy/wheat in the U.S. has been genetically modified. I just thought I would mention it since it isn't widely known. We cook with safflower and extra virgin olive oils.

Best cooking oil, Healthy Cooking Oils
Maybe I'll switch to safflower...

Quote:
Originally Posted by agreatlife View Post
I like making fried chicken and experimented with different oils, and for me, the clear winner was shortening. The chicken came out crispier and lighter with the shortening.
I've read where people swear, even today, that you need shortening with certain recipes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
I believe they came up with the name Canola because well... rapeseed oil just doesn't sound too appealing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
"Can someone pass me the rape oil please?"
lol!

Quote:
Originally Posted by vision33r View Post
The main difference between oils is cooking or smoke point when the oil burns up.

Oils like peanut and canola is great for frying. Olive oil is good for sautes and light cooking. Extra virgin olive oil is not good for sautes unless you use a heavy amount to avoid drying.
Yep, I use canola only for high heat, otherwise it's extra virgin olive oil. I'd heard peanut oil is good for high heat, too, so I guess I'll just try that as well as safflower.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-10-2019, 09:01 AM
 
10,978 posts, read 4,413,753 times
Reputation: 15762
I use olive oil for almost everything but then again, I grew up Italian. My grandmother lived to 103 and my mom is 87 and still kicking and both only used olive oil all their lives. I figure I can't go wrong with that. I don't do very much frying.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2019, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
19,900 posts, read 13,101,984 times
Reputation: 26382
Quote:
Originally Posted by andthentherewere3 View Post
By vegetable oil, do you mean soybean oil? Because generally speaking, canola and corn oil is a vegetable oil. It can be very confusing! Technically speaking, soybeans are not really a vegetable, but a legume, in the peanut family. But all cooking oils are commonly referred to as vegetable oils, so when you see "vegetable oil" in a recipe, you can choose the healthiest oil, depending on it's smoke point. Extra virgin olive oil is probably the healthiest oil, but it doesn't do well with high heat, so it isn't good for frying.

As I sat here thinking of how best to explain the pros and cons of various oils, I decided it would be easiest to post a link. One thing about canola oil though, it is said to be healthy, but it has been genetically modified. There are studies that suggest all sorts of health issues are possible from consuming genetically modified foods. However, you will already be eating genetically modified foods on a daily basis, since most corn/soy/wheat in the U.S. has been genetically modified. I just thought I would mention it since it isn't widely known. We cook with safflower and extra virgin olive oils.

Best cooking oil, Healthy Cooking Oils
I use non GMO canola oil. It is more expensive, but it is readily available in places like Whole Foods. I use canola because I view it as healthy and it is a high smoke point oil. I use cold pressed organic olive oil from California for daily salads.

It is also true that processed foods probably do contain GMO ingredients, so it is always best to limit consumption of those anyway. But I have no way of knowing whether fresh veggies are GMO or not. I do buy organic from the dirty dozen list though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2019, 10:49 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,241 posts, read 10,319,170 times
Reputation: 5098
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanhawk View Post
Thanks for the reply. I guess it doesn't make too much difference. As to whether the vegetable oil is soybean oil, I am only going by what the label says, so I don't know.
I haven't read through this whole thread carefully, but my understanding is that any oils from these vegetable/legume-producing plants that lie low to the ground are not natural, but - since about a century, probably a bit less - people have extracted and industrially processed them at very high heat: you can probably find websites or YouTube videos that walk you through the process; I read about it in a book.

In that sense, yes, it doesn't make too much difference; some might have more or less mono or poly saturated or unsaturated fats. Some have higher or lower smoke points.

Personally, I have given up use of vegetable/legume oils. In moderation, they are probably not particularly hazardous, but heavy and constant use over a period of a lifetime could clog up the arteries.


In contrast, oils from fruit trees, namely olive and avocado, can be cold-pressed with relatively little processing which has been going on for thousands of years, at least in the case of olive oil and sesame oil.

I am not sure how coconut oil is extracted and processed, and I have heard mixed reviews about its health benefits and hazards. Personally I use coconut oil for skin treatments, and my spouse in her hair, not as food.

One major difference between olive oil and avocado oil is that the latter has a much higher smoke point so you can bake and fry with it at high temperatures, while olive oil is better at room temperature or low-temperature sauteing.

As someone has alluded to, the idea behind more expensive but higher quality food is that you consume less of it for more nutritional value, so month-to-month spend about the same, while in the long run enjoy better health and less medical expenses.

Others will disagree; this is not science, but art on personal-experience basis.

Hope this helps.

Good Luck!

Last edited by bale002; 01-10-2019 at 11:00 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2019, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
15,750 posts, read 15,707,991 times
Reputation: 11581
All loaded with high amounts of Omega-6.....which many people get way too much of.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2019, 06:24 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,241 posts, read 10,319,170 times
Reputation: 5098
Quote:
Originally Posted by tickyul View Post
All loaded with high amounts of Omega-6.....which many people get way too much of.

I believe that the above poster is referring to most vegetable oils. Canola oil seems to be an exception.

Here is an article from WebMD about the different kinds of fats and oils that the OP may find helpful.

One of the conclusions is favorable to olive oil and canola oil, unfavorable to vegetable oils.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2019, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
15,750 posts, read 15,707,991 times
Reputation: 11581
Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
I believe that the above poster is referring to most vegetable oils. Canola oil seems to be an exception.

Here is an article from WebMD about the different kinds of fats and oils that the OP may find helpful.

One of the conclusions is favorable to olive oil and canola oil, unfavorable to vegetable oils.

Canola has a little better fatty-acid profile that most vegetable-oils..........but still is loaded with Omega-6.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2019, 08:32 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,140 posts, read 2,096,846 times
Reputation: 3740
I don't touch any "vegetable" oils at all. They don't come from vegetables, they come from seeds and are made using toxic chemicals and high heat. They are touted as healthy but are actually the opposite. I guess some people never got the meme. It is actually preferable to consume coconut oil, lard, and butter. They are actually better for your health. The old myth of saturated fat as being bad is wrong. Does anyone actually think they stay in their present form and make it all the way to your arteries when consumed? It doesn't work that way.

PUFA's: The Worst Thing For Your Health That You Eat Everyday

Sorry, this probably belongs in the health forum but I couldn't help myself.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
6,241 posts, read 10,319,170 times
Reputation: 5098
Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
I don't touch any "vegetable" oils at all. They don't come from vegetables, they come from seeds and are made using toxic chemicals and high heat. They are touted as healthy but are actually the opposite. I guess some people never got the meme. It is actually preferable to consume coconut oil, lard, and butter.
I agree: "vegetable" oils are not food fit for human consumption, they are industrial products.

I can't stomach, literally, animal fats, so I stick to tree oils like olive and avocado, would also try coconut but don't like the taste much, use it instead as skin ointment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2019, 10:55 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,140 posts, read 2,096,846 times
Reputation: 3740
Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
I agree: "vegetable" oils are not food fit for human consumption, they are industrial products.

I can't stomach, literally, animal fats, so I stick to tree oils like olive and avocado, would also try coconut but don't like the taste much, use it instead as skin ointment.
Yes, my go-to oils right now are Avocado if I'm going to use heat and EVOO for dressings and to top dishes.
Avocado is a bit pricey, I get is at Sam's club for $8 a liter. The coconut oil I have is also suitable for high heat. It is refined organic so no coconut taste at all and yes, it is saturated. It turns solid below 76 degrees Fahrenheit. When I make eggs though, there's nothing like butter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top