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Old 08-16-2019, 02:07 PM
 
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Not that I would share a knife with raw chicken and fresh vegetables--however I feel like since both are being cooked right away there is no harm in it.

What is the difference if the raw chicken is put on the grill, then the zucchini is added with the chicken still grilling?

Anyways--I rarely eat out. I like knowing how my food is prepared and where the food comes from.
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Old 08-16-2019, 08:44 PM
 
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if it bothers you don't go there.
i've heard enough stories from people who worked in restaurants that i would not enjoy my food if i ate out.
particularly when people complain and make a public scene
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Old 08-17-2019, 07:18 AM
 
6,429 posts, read 2,988,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkgourmet View Post
I cook at home probably 27 out of 30 nights. I'm aware of the potential contamination and germ issues, and work hard to avoid them.

But I'm honest enough to admit and fairly certain that MOST restaurant kitchens are more sanitized than mine. that is likely true If the health department inspector turned up in ANY home kitchen.
I concur with that bolded part. I worked the restaurant business. Temperature checks every hour. Gloves worn. washing hands. Hair nets. Sanitizations Every NIGHT as part of closing. And yes we had the city inspector show up ...and he was relentless on temperature controls and calibrations.

Most foods have the temperature kill the harm. and yes sometimes Freezing it can do the same thing.....

Some of the tastiest foods were in mexico at stands...I doubt real highly they are "sterile"in prepping.
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Old 08-17-2019, 08:06 AM
 
1,095 posts, read 304,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOS2IAD View Post
Supposedly the chefs are trained to use a "sanitizing cloth". They are supposed to wipe off the spatula after, for example, using it on raw chicken then using it on veggies. In the past, they were really good about that---not so much now.
And what's on that cloth after they've used it 10 times? I assume we're talking *disposable* wipes? (For that matter, what is the sanitizing agent they're wiping on the spatula that will then be touching the food?) Wouldn't it be easier to just have a second spatula?

But yes, as others have pointed out, I've seen them throw meat on the grill, and toss the vegetables in while the meat is still half-cooked, so...
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Old 08-17-2019, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ > Raleigh, NC
15,187 posts, read 19,258,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post

Some of the tastiest foods were in mexico at stands...I doubt real highly they are "sterile"in prepping.
Yep - and let's include the famously good street stalls and night markets in Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia. . . As the locals will tell you, The 'safety trick' is to watch that the person handling the money isn't touching the food.

BTW do y'all eat the food at state fairs, baseball / football games, picnics, etc?
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Old 08-17-2019, 09:17 AM
 
Location: London U.K.
1,494 posts, read 653,776 times
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To me, your option 1 sounded best, just tell the manager quietly and calmly what you’ve come across before, and say that you’d appreciate it if it didn’t happen on this visit.
As others have said, we have no idea of what’s going on when we can’t see the cooks and the kitchen, and when I consider the countries that I’ve eaten in around the world, I reckon that I must have led a charmed life.
The only time that I recall getting what we in U.K. call “Delhi belly”, was a 24 hour thing in a resort in Greece, just along the coast from Athens, however, circa 1980, my then girlfriend, had a bad dose of it in Tangier, Morocco.
She was zonked out, and the hotel sent for a doctor, who could only speak Arabic and French.
He examined her and asked me, “pourrait-elle être enceinte?”, (could she be pregnant?), I said, “Dieu, j'espère que non, son père va me tuer!” (God, I hope not, her father will kill me!”).
She was out of it for around 48 hours, and groggy for another half a day, but she gave chicken and cous-cous a miss for a while after that.
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Old 08-17-2019, 10:49 AM
 
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Giving "instructions" on food preparation, upon your arrival to eat at a place, is poor form and inappropriate. They'll probably start putting a "CLOSED" sign on the door, when they see you coming.

You need to eat some place where you don't feel the need to "instruct" the staff on food prep. Other customers at the restaurant would probably appreciate that, too.
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Old 08-17-2019, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,768 posts, read 26,985,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean-Francois View Post
To me, your option 1 sounded best, just tell the manager quietly and calmly what you’ve come across before, and say that you’d appreciate it if it didn’t happen on this visit.
As others have said, we have no idea of what’s going on when we can’t see the cooks and the kitchen, and when I consider the countries that I’ve eaten in around the world, I reckon that I must have led a charmed life.
The only time that I recall getting what we in U.K. call “Delhi belly”, was a 24 hour thing in a resort in Greece, just along the coast from Athens, however, circa 1980, my then girlfriend, had a bad dose of it in Tangier, Morocco.
She was zonked out, and the hotel sent for a doctor, who could only speak Arabic and French.
He examined her and asked me, “pourrait-elle être enceinte?”, (could she be pregnant?), I said, “Dieu, j'espère que non, son père va me tuer!” (God, I hope not, her father will kill me!”).
She was out of it for around 48 hours, and groggy for another half a day, but she gave chicken and cous-cous a miss for a while after that.

Better than "son mari va me tuer!"

To the OP, this seems like a stressful place for you to visit now. I feel like the best answer is to not return there. You *could* have a conversation with the manager (I wouldn't) and maybe it'll be fine for *this* visit and/or with *this* chef, but I feel like you'll always wonder what you're in for the next time and never be comfortable there.
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Old 08-17-2019, 10:55 AM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,142 posts, read 3,293,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOS2IAD View Post

So...on to my question. When we go there again, how do we handle this? I've considered on of the following options:

1) As soon as we get to the host station, let the person there know we want to talk to the manager on duty. We would then let him/her know of our previous experience and say we don't want a repeat of that.

2) Say nothing and get seated. If the chef cross contaminates the food, we would do one of the following:


A) Call the chef out in front of everybody at the table. My concern is that might not go over well with the diners at our table, Or;

B) The minute we notice any cross contamination, one of us would get up and find the manager.

What do you all recommend? Thank you for reading and thank you for your responses.
I suggest 2 and then B Then exit....Never to return...
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Old 08-17-2019, 10:57 AM
 
7,006 posts, read 3,889,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
(snip)

Obviously the easy answer is to go to a different restaurant that gives free birthday dinners if that's important to you. I've had food poisoning one time. It was miserable. It probably wasn't cross contamination because all I ate was chili that had been cooked for a very long time. I believe it was an unclean bowl or spoon, but I'll never know, and that could happen at any restaurant, or even at home.
I had food poisoning one time. Pretty sure it was from a rotisserie chicken I got at a grocery store. Boy, was I sick...from both ends. It came on suddenly and was violent, and then subsided later that evening. The upside was....I lost several pounds! Fluids, I guess. But, hey...several pounds is several pounds.

I never bought another rotisserie chicken there again. I got sick just thinking about it. I didn't go back to instruct them on the proper care and handling of raw chicken, and how to properly roast it, though. If a business doesn't do these things already, my little instructions aren't going to matter. The problem is at the managerial level, and there's no fixing that, IMO.

I get my rotisserie chickens elsewhere. I've not gotten sick from that again, thank goodness.
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