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Old 10-11-2023, 10:16 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
32,645 posts, read 48,028,221 times
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A couple of things about honey. The lighter the color, the milder the flavor. If you want strong honey taste, buy the darker colored honey.

Honey is often diluted with sugar or corn syrup. if you are noticing a difference in the level of sweetness, you might be comparing pure natural honey to a honey mixtue. The sugar added honey apparently does not have to be labeled.

Each type of pollen make s different flavor of honey, so as the flowers on plants change during the year, the honey changes
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Old 10-11-2023, 10:19 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
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I learned a little something about gathering honey in the wild several years ago. I was working for the state highway department and we had contractors clearing trees off the rights of way. The crew was cutting a tree when they found a "honey tree", where the bees were going in and out of a hole. They squirted a little bit of gas on the tree trunk around the hole and left it alone the rest of the day. The next morning, all the bees were gone, so these men could get the honey without getting stung. They cut a square around the hole with a chain saw, peeled the wood back and got enough honey for everybody. When they were done, they put the pieces of the trunk back in place and held it in place with zip ties around the tree. They said after a while, the bees looking for the pollen or whatever, will discover this old hive and they will move back in.
The honey was delicious!
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Old 10-11-2023, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Beacon Falls
1,366 posts, read 994,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Honey is often diluted with sugar or corn syrup.

Not this - this is raw, unfiltered, unheated honey with nothing added. Well, theoretically.
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Old 10-11-2023, 12:42 PM
 
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I found this...

HONEY SEASONS
Spring honey is often lighter in color. The honey is produced from the nectar of spring flowers, such as dandelions, clover, and tulips.

Summer honey is usually darker in color. The honey is produced from the nectar of summer flowers, such as lavender, sunflowers, and blueberries.

Fall honey is also darker in color. The honey is produced from the nectar of fall flowers, such as aster and goldenrod.

Winter honey is the darkest in color. The honey is produced from the nectar of winter plants, such as holly and ivy. Winter honey has a stronger flavor than other types of honey because it has a higher concentration of fructose.
https://worldofhoney.com/2022/03/07/...t%20in%20color.
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Old 10-11-2023, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Beacon Falls
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Thanks ^

So there are in fact seasons....

Seems like winter honey is what I want!
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Old 10-11-2023, 07:31 PM
 
Location: NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riffwraith View Post
Thanks ^

So there are in fact seasons....

Seems like winter honey is what I want!

I think the advice for you to speak to a local bee keeper was good advice for you. I would see what kind of honey they have on hand. You may luck out to where they have honey from each season, so that you can buy the one you want.

I started buying local honey because it's supposed to be good for you, because it has the local floral pollen for people with allergies or something like that.

I've always kept honey on hand in case someone gets sick, honey feels so good on a sore throat. I also like honey on fresh fruit, especially strawberries and pineapple.

Not having store honey in the house at the same time as local honey, my hub used the whole bottle of local honey when he was sick, I didn't even get to taste it. Now I make sure to have a store bought honey in the house in addition to the local honey.


What Kind of Honey is Best for a Cough?

Quote:
Coughing is caused by the irritation of the mucus membranes lining the throat and lungs. Honey has long been used as a natural remedy for sore throats and coughs. It contains antioxidants that can help reduce inflammation in the throat, as well as antibacterial properties that can help fight off infection. Honey also has a thick consistency that coats the throat and helps to soothe irritation. Plus, its sweet taste makes it an enjoyable way to get relief from coughing fits.

...When it comes to choosing which type of honey is best for cough relief, there’s no one-size-fits-all answer since everyone’s needs are different. However, raw or Manuka honeys tend to be more effective due to their higher levels of antioxidants and antibacterial properties compared to other varieties like clover or organic honeys. Ultimately, it’s up to you which type you choose – just make sure it’s pure, unprocessed, unpasteurized, and free from added sugars or artificial sweeteners for maximum benefit!

Last edited by Roselvr; 10-11-2023 at 07:40 PM..
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Old 10-12-2023, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riffwraith View Post
Is there at time of year where honey is sweeter/darker, vs. less sweet/lighter? Are there "seasons" for honey?
Here in NC, we occasionally get blue/purple honey

https://www.wral.com/north-carolina-...rare/20487452/
"A Reddit post has gone viral for pointing out a fact that many North Carolinians already knew: The state has purple and blue honey, which is rare and not seen in other states."
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Old 10-12-2023, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Beacon Falls
1,366 posts, read 994,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don6170 View Post
Here in NC, we occasionally get blue/purple honey

https://www.wral.com/north-carolina-...rare/20487452/
"A Reddit post has gone viral for pointing out a fact that many North Carolinians already knew: The state has purple and blue honey, which is rare and not seen in other states."
Oh wow -




I want some!!!

In the sandhills of North Carolina, bees produce purple honey. It is the only place on Earth where it is found.

Have you ever tried it? Curious to see how it tastes, and what the texture is.
Attached Thumbnails
Anyone know anything about honey? Are there seasons?-hon.jpg  
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Old 10-12-2023, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Beacon Falls
1,366 posts, read 994,154 times
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Some more good stuff:


https://www.newsobserver.com/living/...265810181.html




But they agree that a) purple or blue honey comes sporadically with no tried-and-true telltale signs that it’s coming, and b) the color is natural.

Christi Henthorn, president of the Granville County Beekeepers, got purple honey in 2017 in Oxford for the first time, and she hasn’t seen it since

A handful of lucky beekeepers have experienced the honey more than once, though not on a regular schedule.

David Auman, president of the Richmond County Beekeepers Association, gets a little bit of the stuff each year, but needs to wait a few years to get the unique honey in large batches that he’s able to separate, jar and sell. He keeps two or three hives at a time, though he’ll surprisingly only get purple honey in one of them, he said.
Attached Thumbnails
Anyone know anything about honey? Are there seasons?-hon2.jpg  
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Old 10-18-2023, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
50,369 posts, read 63,964,084 times
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One of the Master Gardeners I know took a beekeeping course, and started tending hives and selling the honey. During the pandemic he had trouble getting the glass jars he used (got them from Germany). He had so much honey that he started buying huge jars of pickles, dumping the pickles out and using the jars for the honey.
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