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Old 11-24-2023, 05:00 PM
 
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Spending early years and then summers on an alpine 100 day cattle range - mushrooms, berries, herbs, roots were a given.
If you consider game of any kind foraging - this is how we made it through our leaner years in the US. Not bad for an almost vegetarian to learn to hunt, gut, butcher and cook.
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Old 11-24-2023, 05:21 PM
 
Location: In The South
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When I was a kid we foraged all the time. Lived at the base of a sort of mountain (we called it a mountain, it was more like a bunch of rocky hills. All built up with condos and such now).

My parents were pretty knowledgeable, we would hike the mountain and pick tons of mushrooms. Dad called them “stumpies”, stump musrooms.

We would drive to various cow pastures and pick pasture mushroom. Same as the white ones you buy in the supermarket. Also, shaggy manes, which need to be picked before they open to release their spores.

My heritage is primarily Italian, so we were heavily into digging dandelion greens in the early spring. You have to get them early, once they bloom they turn bitter. I never see them here in South Louisiana until they’re blossoming, so I don’t get to partake much any more.

We picked pokeweed early in the spring, too.

I don’t remember all the details of what’s good and what’s not, so I don’t trust myself to do it any more.
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Old 11-24-2023, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
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I grew up in the outskirts of The Ozarks on a working farm. Foraging was part of life. I can probably count on one hand the number of times we bought meat or produce at the store. Most of what we ate was grown, hunted, or gathered. I also went through a bit of a survivalist phase when I was a teenager where I would leave the house with a backpack, a bedroll, and sometimes* either a bow or firearm and stay gone for days at a time and live on what I could hunt or gather. I don't remember the title, but I had a book on edible wild plants that went with me and was consulted quite frequently early on but less so as I learned which plants were safe.

*I also learned to make bows and make and use an atlatl and a sling, so sometimes I just went full on primitive and created what I needed to hunt.
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Old 11-24-2023, 08:56 PM
 
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Sure. Where I am now, wild blackberries & if I’m lucky, wild strawberries. I’m not knowledgeable enough to do mushroom foraging. And when I was growing up in the desert, prickly pears (nopales & tunas) & piñons.
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Old 11-24-2023, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Dessert
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I foraged a couple gallons of nopales (prickly pear fruit) this year. Entirely from my land, and I could have gathered loads more. Wear gloves and use metal tongs, lots of thorns!

Washed, frozen then thawed, mashed, drained, and filtered, I got almost a gallon of juice. Tastes a bit like watermelon, and is the most beautiful deep pink. Froze it in cubes for all my nopales juice needs.

I've wanted to try the process for years, checked it off my bucket list, and won't do it again.

Last edited by steiconi; 11-25-2023 at 12:11 AM..
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Old 11-25-2023, 12:15 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
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Foraging is pretty common in our wet climate of PNW.

Our freezer is filled with foraged produce, and we volunteer with a gleaner's organization that feeds the hungry of the world with gleaned and foraged goods.

It's a wise, healthy, practical, and economical to do so.
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Old 11-25-2023, 02:13 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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I've been mushroom hunting before. The ones that look like little white Christmas trees. I think they were called morels. Nutty tasting and wonderful.
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Old 11-25-2023, 04:22 AM
 
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I'm learning foraging because I'm surrounded by nature and there's so much out there! So far Lion's Mane and Oyster are the only mushrooms I've found. I've dug burdock root but haven't processed it. Blackberries galore. I'm hesitant to glean where the dogs frolic, dandelion & violets. Wild mint is everywhere - there's just too much.

I think everything on a cattail is edible. I have those, too.
I've made cookies using dandelion that were wonderful.
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Old 11-25-2023, 07:44 AM
 
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One caution about foraging is that wild plants growing along roadsides are capable of absorbing considerable amounts of heavy metals from exhaust and oil/gas effluent. So you want to forage a comfortable distance from highways/streets.
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Old 11-25-2023, 07:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
I'm learning foraging because I'm surrounded by nature and there's so much out there! So far Lion's Mane and Oyster are the only mushrooms I've found. I've dug burdock root but haven't processed it. Blackberries galore. I'm hesitant to glean where the dogs frolic, dandelion & violets. Wild mint is everywhere - there's just too much.

I think everything on a cattail is edible. I have those, too.
I've made cookies using dandelion that were wonderful.
Morels. I try to discourage people from hunting these because i have enough competition already.
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