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Old 11-25-2023, 08:49 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,987 posts, read 1,952,223 times
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My grandparents were good foragers and I learned how to catch crabs and dig clams from them.
Saw my grandfather dress a very large snapping turtle, also cook possum (I think it was that).
He and my father went at full moon looking for softshell crabs in the canal.
GF came from farm family with very little money.

No one in our family has ever been good at fishing, including me, tried many, many times.
I foraged dandelions from our non-pesticided yard and my stomach objected greatly. Should have made tea from them.
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Old 11-25-2023, 11:56 AM
 
1,711 posts, read 765,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GearHeadDave View Post
Morels. I try to discourage people from hunting these because i have enough competition already.
People in my area forage for morels and sell them at the farmers market for insane prices. Even more insane is the huckleberry market. Huckleberries only grow wild out in the woods and locals have their chosen areas staked out. A few years ago there was an incident of someone pulling a gun on another huckleberry picker because they were intruding in "his" area. LOL

These berries sell for something like $50/gallon at local markets and I see people standing in line to buy them! Ridiculous.
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Old 11-25-2023, 03:39 PM
 
Location: on the wind
22,815 posts, read 18,101,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artillery77 View Post
I've been mushroom hunting before. The ones that look like little white Christmas trees. I think they were called morels. Nutty tasting and wonderful.
I lived/worked out of a remote research field camp on the AK Peninsula one year. The weather that year just happened to be perfect for morels. Stumbled on hundreds of them scattered across a cow parsnip-covered hillside. We gathered freezer bags full. Can you imagine cooking up so many morels at once there were leftovers?

Last edited by Parnassia; 11-25-2023 at 05:00 PM..
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Old 11-25-2023, 03:51 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
People in my area forage for morels and sell them at the farmers market for insane prices. Even more insane is the huckleberry market. Huckleberries only grow wild out in the woods and locals have their chosen areas staked out. A few years ago there was an incident of someone pulling a gun on another huckleberry picker because they were intruding in "his" area. LOL

These berries sell for something like $50/gallon at local markets and I see people standing in line to buy them! Ridiculous.
The most highly prized wild berry in AK is the nagoonberry (aka "arctic raspberry Rubus arcticus). Just a few can lend their wonderful flavor to more common but lesser berries mixed with them (cloudberries, arctic strawberries, salmonberries, etc.). People guard the location of known patches with extreme jealousy. A family's nagoonberry patch is sacred...and secret. Someone might be generous enough to give you nagoonberry mix jam but they aren't going to tell you where they got the ingredients!

Last edited by Parnassia; 11-25-2023 at 05:01 PM..
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Old 11-25-2023, 05:21 PM
 
Location: equator
10,999 posts, read 6,523,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max and Catriona View Post
My husband is into foraging. He is unbelievably brave / crazy when it comes to eating stuff he finds out in nature. I've had to talk him out of trying some wild berry type things that he really wanted to eat. Sometimes I'll see his eyes looking at some tree or plant and I know exactly what he's thinking and I'm like "please don't do it Max..." He's also been known to take fruit off of trees in people's yards (or off the ground under the tree) when we're on a walk. I pretend I don't know him.

I've gone with him on guided 'wild food foraging walks' but I did not partake in eating anything. Some wild foods we learned about were cattails (I believe it was the roots that are edible), wood sorrel (looks like clover and has a tart, citrus flavor), and wild carrot Queen Anne's Lace (the root is like a carrot.) Wild grapes are easy to find in many areas. We had American Beautyberry in our yard at our previous house and while not very tasty off the bush apparently it can be used to make jam / jelly and pie.

The guide on one of the wild food foraging walks gave some tips for determining safety of stuff you find that looks potentially edible. First rub it on inner forearm, wait and watch for skin reaction / rash, next rub on lips and wait for reaction like tingling or numbness, if no reaction from those two steps touch it to tongue and wait to see if any reaction. If no reaction from those steps take a tiny bite and wait to see if any reaction. The guide also said if something tastes really bad like very bitter or soapy, spit it out and trust your taste buds it is likely not a good idea to eat that thing.
My ex was a survivalist, so he knew all this kind of stuff. When we were on our 1,000 mile horseback trek on the Pacific Crest Trail, we foraged all the time. Several of the ones you mentioned: sorrel, wild carrot, wild onion. Cattail roots. Even acorns.

There is quite a process for acorns. Mash, roast, put in a mesh bag or nylon stocking and suspend in running water for days to wash out the tannin. I made acorn pancakes and bread (mixed with flour).

Wild blueberries and strawberries. Blackberries, chokecherries. We even dried many of the greens in the sun on black plastic, for future use.

We foraged mussels along Point Reyes in CA. Hunting of course supplemented our diet. Smoked the meat and kept it in wet canvas bags. Wild asparagus used to grow along the Colorado River.

I don't know about the city, other than dog-peed dandelions, lol.

And a good laugh over your husband there!
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Old 11-25-2023, 05:49 PM
 
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Oh, I forgot! While in California I picked a lot of Jerusalem artichokes & bay leaves.
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Old 11-25-2023, 05:54 PM
 
1,601 posts, read 677,565 times
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Originally Posted by GearHeadDave View Post
Morels. I try to discourage people from hunting these because i have enough competition already.
Everybody around here are very protective & secretive about where they go mushroom hunting.
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Old 11-26-2023, 08:25 AM
 
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I've foraged for truffles and mushrooms.

Important to note- read up on which mushrooms are toxic. For obvious reasons.
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Old 11-26-2023, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,809 posts, read 6,891,317 times
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I've foraged for years, until mobility issues slowed me down. I've gotten black raspberries, elderberries, wild blueberries, apples from abandoned orchards, wild plums, wild grapes, butternuts, dandelions, and acorns. The acorns were a bust....I had planned to dry and ground them for flour, but never could leach the bitterness from them. All the other items were wonderful, free, and delicious.
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Old 11-27-2023, 09:54 AM
 
4,168 posts, read 3,357,627 times
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If in my own yard counts, then yes. Wild mustard.
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