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Old 08-14-2008, 06:59 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
3,400 posts, read 4,813,400 times
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Default Northern Food Vs. Southern Food

Ok, this is just for the sake of a FUN argument.

Which one is most preferred out of these two regions, Northern Food (I.e Scrapple, hashbrowns, bagels, etc)

- OR-

Southern Food- (I.e Fried Chicken, Collard Greens, Grits, Biscuits 'n Gravy)

Personally...I prefer Southern, with some exceptions of course.

I refuse to eat chitlins, pigs feet, or hash. (Thats different from hash browns)

 
Old 08-14-2008, 07:19 PM
 
8,863 posts, read 8,542,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colddiamond102 View Post
Ok, this is just for the sake of a FUN argument.

Which one is most preferred out of these two regions, Northern Food (I.e Scrapple, hashbrowns, bagels, etc)

- OR-

Southern Food- (I.e Fried Chicken, Collard Greens, Grits, Biscuits 'n Gravy)

Personally...I prefer Southern, with some exceptions of course.

I refuse to eat chitlins, pigs feet, or hash. (Thats different from hash browns)
I also refuse to eat chitlins, pigs feet, scrapple and something strange made from liver--a type of loaf. I just didn't eat my lunch one day when my Mother made a sandwich with that.

I guess I prefer Southern food--although a fresh bagel with cream cheese is one of my favorite things. I like grits, biscuits and some kinds of gravy--my friend makes 'Sawmill Gravy' with sausage and that is really good. A nice sausage and biscuit and grits is a good breakfast. (Born and bred in Dixie--Atlanta, GA and we ate what was available. I must have cornbread--cornsticks are my favorites. Good at night with a glass of buttermilk. My grandfather had a farm and they ate the big meal at noon and cornbread and buttermilk--fresh from a cow at night.)

Never have eaten Cream of Wheat--we ate oatmeal on the days we didn't eat grits and it doesn't sound exciting.

Hash--corned beef hash--I like that, with a poached egg. We used to have that for supper and it was a treat.

Baked sweet potatoes with butter and fresh turnip greens with vinegar or pepper sauce and a pork chop is a great winter meal. How can you grow up big and strong without such food? LOL.

TakeAhike
 
Old 08-14-2008, 07:22 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
3,400 posts, read 4,813,400 times
Reputation: 2719
Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
I also refuse to eat chitlins, pigs feet, scrapple and something strange made from liver--a type of loaf. I just didn't eat my lunch one day when my Mother made a sandwich with that.

I guess I prefer Southern food--although a fresh bagel with cream cheese is one of my favorite things. I like grits, biscuits and some kinds of gravy--my friend makes 'Sawmill Gravy' with sausage and that is really good. A nice sausage and biscuit and grits is a good breakfast.

Never have eaten Cream of Wheat--we ate oatmeal on the days we didn't eat grits and it doesn't sound exciting.

Hash--corned beef hash--I like that, with a poached egg. We used to have that for supper and it was a treat.

Baked sweet potatoes with butter and fresh turnip greens with vinegar or pepper sauce and a pork chop is a great winter meal. How can you grow up big and strong without such food? LOL.

TakeAhike
lol very true. The version of hash I wont eat is similar to chitlins (My dad told me what it was once, but Ive since forgotten what exactly it was made of)

Id rather eat turnip greens like collards. Not much of a vinegar person, and if I get the choice between a fresh biscuit and a bagel, the biscuit wins everytime.
 
Old 08-14-2008, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
5,413 posts, read 9,024,524 times
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I never heard of Scrapple (or chitlins) until I moved to Va. ( from Pa.) - I thought that was Southern?

Just a generalization...seems like the Southern thing to do is fry everything - I like bbq w/sauce, on a salad I like vinegar (or vinegar based).
 
Old 08-14-2008, 07:31 PM
 
8,863 posts, read 8,542,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colddiamond102 View Post
lol very true. The version of hash I wont eat is similar to chitlins (My dad told me what it was once, but Ive since forgotten what exactly it was made of)

Id rather eat turnip greens like collards. Not much of a vinegar person, and if I get the choice between a fresh biscuit and a bagel, the biscuit wins everytime.
I like both turnip greens and collards and they have 2 different distinctive tastes--collards are more like 'cabbage' to me. What I really love are turnips and rutabagas--they have a little 'kick' that intrigues me.

New Year's day is the day of Southern food in my family. The chitlins--which I pass to the next person--cornbread, turnip greens and/or collards, turnips and rutabagas, sweet potatoes, chow chow--cabbage and onion relish-- a must for the greens, pork of some kind--and the black eyed peas--it is a tradition to put a penny and a dime in the bowl. I never get either--eat a lot of black eyed peas for change and lots of turnip greens/collards for folding money--so goes the saying.

For dessert ambrosia. Oranges and pineapple and coconut. I love it, love it, love it. I usually make the cookies--snowballs. A butter cookie with pecans or walnuts and rolled in confectioner's sugar. Others bring pies--chocolate, berry and pecan. Very full and content after such a meal. :-)
 
Old 08-14-2008, 07:41 PM
 
8,863 posts, read 8,542,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flamingo13 View Post
I never heard of Scrapple (or chitlins) until I moved to Va. ( from Pa.) - I thought that was Southern?

Just a generalization...seems like the Southern thing to do is fry everything - I like bbq w/sauce, on a salad I like vinegar (or vinegar based).
I always wonder about that generalization--there had to be frying going on in other regions. Now, it is no secret, if you watch Paula Dean's cooking show that a lot of butter is used in Southern food--traditional southern food. Still, I have heard that a lot of butter is used in France and they keep their cholesterol under control--theories have included the French are more active--walk a lot and I forget what else was said.

My particular family became more health conscious and we fry less often--everyone watching the cholesterol. We ate a lot of homemade ice cream and pound cakes and quantities of hushpuppies and fried catfish--I can vouch for that. And a lot of fresh vegetables--everyone grew some vegetables.

For a Southern food--nothing can compare to fresh creamed corn with fresh tomatoes. Simply The Best.
 
Old 08-14-2008, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Northern VA
3,796 posts, read 5,335,560 times
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Southern by far!!!

There is no food like good ol' southern/soul food (basically the same thing).
 
Old 08-14-2008, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Arkieville
109 posts, read 194,187 times
Reputation: 106
Southern food > Yankee food

Fact of life.
 
Old 08-14-2008, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Where Trolls get BBQ'd
131,636 posts, read 42,778,166 times
Reputation: 114039
Got to vote southern. What would the world come to without fried chicken and collard greens? And did ya mention cracklin cornbread? Yea I know I said the "FRIED" word but my grandmother fried until 93??? Now I confess I cleaned up the fried word and use sautéed a lot cause it is done in low heat olive oil.
 
Old 08-14-2008, 08:52 PM
 
8,863 posts, read 8,542,238 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Got to vote southern. What would the world come to without fried chicken and collard greens? And did ya mention cracklin cornbread? Yea I know I said the "FRIED" word but my grandmother fried until 93??? Now I confess I cleaned up the fried word and use sautéed a lot cause it is done in low heat olive oil.
The Pot Liquor is great--the juice from cooking the turnip or collard greens.

Who has actually seen a collard? Raising my hand because my uncle grows them. They are huge--you pull the leaves off and soak them in buckets--in case there is sand or grit on them. Then we usually cook them in a pressure cooker. A derivation from the traditional method perhaps? My family loves to cook things in the pressure cooker. My Mother got hers in the 50's still going strong.
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