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Old 02-18-2007, 08:57 AM
 
265 posts, read 1,401,270 times
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.... Does anyone who doesn't either live in, or grew up in, the tri-state (Metro NY, etc.) area know what an "egg cream" is?

I'm betting probably not.
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Old 02-18-2007, 09:59 AM
 
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Should have specified. Mayo on things such as burgers. I find it gross.
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Old 02-18-2007, 06:56 PM
 
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I wouldn't be happy if my burger comes with ketchup on it. I'll put ketchup if I want to, but please don't take for granted I want it!

That said, here in Manhattan they give you a bottle of ketchup, but many times you've got to ask for mustard- it doesn't come with the platter. Somehow, mustard appears not to be popular.

Anyhow, I like my burger plain, just meat and very rare, no sauces. But it's got to be a good burger.
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Old 02-18-2007, 10:22 PM
 
265 posts, read 1,401,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manhattan-ite View Post
...here in Manhattan they give you a bottle of ketchup, but many times you've got to ask for mustard- it doesn't come with the platter. Somehow, mustard appears not to be popular.
That's because NYC is part of Mustard-Never-Land, just like Queens and Long Island.

Mustard is popular on hotdogs, corned beef sandwiches, and some other things. But not on burgers!
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Old 02-18-2007, 11:02 PM
 
Location: New York
2,003 posts, read 4,394,385 times
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Sandwichs on a loaf of Italian bread have well defined borders. South Jersey to Philly/Pennsy it is called Hoagie. North Jersey and the five Boroughs/Long Island call it a hero. You cross over into Northern Westchester and then CT and New England it is called a wedge. Then you go to palookavile where they lack proper sandwich culture and they call it a sub, which is usually means it is on a over sized hot dog roll.
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Old 02-18-2007, 11:29 PM
 
63 posts, read 200,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OvertaxedOnLI View Post
.... Does anyone who doesn't either live in, or grew up in, the tri-state (Metro NY, etc.) area know what an "egg cream" is?

I'm betting probably not.
A lot of people who DID grow up in Ny have no clue what an Egg Cream is.. I have never had one, and only saw it at one gas station, bottled. Have no clue what it tastes like.
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Old 02-19-2007, 12:02 AM
 
Location: West Central Florida
278 posts, read 729,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samyn on the green View Post
Sandwichs on a loaf of Italian bread have well defined borders. South Jersey to Philly/Pennsy it is called Hoagie. North Jersey and the five Boroughs/Long Island call it a hero. You cross over into Northern Westchester and then CT and New England it is called a wedge. Then you go to palookavile where they lack proper sandwich culture and they call it a sub, which is usually means it is on a over sized hot dog roll.
Hysterical! and so true!
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Old 02-19-2007, 07:14 AM
 
265 posts, read 1,401,270 times
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Originally Posted by ihateny View Post
A lot of people who DID grow up in Ny have no clue what an Egg Cream is.. I have never had one, and only saw it at one gas station, bottled. Have no clue what it tastes like.
Ouch. A bottled egg cream is in the same category as bottled coffee or tea: A poor imitation of something that is meant to be consumed freshly-made.

The recipe for an egg cream is simply whole milk, seltzer (from a sodafountain tap, again not the bottled stuff), and syrup. Nope, not an egg in sight! The type of syrup determines the flavor: Vanilla syrup for a vanilla egg cream, chocolate syrup for a choc. egg cream, etc.

Just as with any "bartender", the quality of an egg cream depends on the person making it and their ratio of the three ingredients. So you'd have differences of opinion on where the Best Egg Creams were found in any neighborhood! I happen to like mine on the sweet side, so as a kid I'd always go to Havens Candy Store because Mr. Haven always used more syrup in his (not that I had any clue about that at the time; I just knew his were "better" than the egg creams served at the other 3 or 4 local places!). Some people like theirs less sweet or more fizzy or less fizzy or whatever.

An egg cream is thirst-quenching, light and sweet at the same time. The bottled versions probably just add milk to vanilla syrup and carbonated water; not the same. The result can't possibly compare to the fresh effervescence of a fountainside egg cream. The perfect analogy is beer: How many people would say that beer from a can or bottle tastes the same as draft at your favorite bar???
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Old 02-19-2007, 10:37 AM
 
Location: NY
417 posts, read 1,730,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samyn on the green View Post
Sandwichs on a loaf of Italian bread have well defined borders. South Jersey to Philly/Pennsy it is called Hoagie. North Jersey and the five Boroughs/Long Island call it a hero. You cross over into Northern Westchester and then CT and New England it is called a wedge. Then you go to palookavile where they lack proper sandwich culture and they call it a sub, which is usually means it is on a over sized hot dog roll.
A 'wedge?' I've lived and travelled all over New England and I've never heard that one! (Which of course doesn't mean it isn't used somewhere....)

You left out 'grinder' in Rhode Island. The classic is the meatball grinder, but just about any deli sandwich on an Italian loaf is a grinder there. And milkshakes used to be called 'cabinets.' No idea where they came up with these terms!
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Old 02-22-2007, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,149 posts, read 7,219,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by honeychrome View Post
Hmm, good question......

and for that matter, where does 'soda' become 'pop?'
where is toasting a bagel standard practice and where is it frowned upon?
why are clams such a big deal in upstate NY?

ah, there are so many other pressing questions like this that need answers!
We said 'pop' in Cleveland for flavored sodas like orange instead of the full 'soda pop'. Everything else we called by it's rightful name; Coke, Pepsi, Root Beer, etc. In Dallas, TX, everything was called a 'coke' even a Dr. Pepper which was the favorite breakfast drink.
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