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Old 12-05-2008, 05:28 PM
 
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I have tried slow cooking in a crock pot, and using foil in the oven. My roast always ends up dry or tough. I know it can also depend on what kind of roast your buying too. Which cuts are the most tender?? I need some awesome tips. Help please!
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Old 12-05-2008, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
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I prefer to use chuck roasts for roast beef. I put them on top of some quartered onions in a roasting pan, add a little red wine, some seasoning (sometimes just Knorr French Onion mix, sometimes I get creative), and slow cook at 275-300 for a few hours until they're ready. You might want to get a meat thermometer, the kind that you can put in the roast and set it for the temperature you want it to be, stick the thermometer itself on the outside of the oven and it'll go off when the roast reaches the internal temp that you want. They're not horribly expensive (ask for one for Christmas!) and they're Worth Every Penny.

How do you cook a roast now? What temp? How long?
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Old 12-05-2008, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Finally made it to Florida and lovin' every minute!
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See, THL, that's pot roast to me. Maybe it's a regional thing. To me, a tenderloin or a prime rib would be the most tender (without cooking it slow and long - which is good, but different) but expensive. For an "everday" roast, we lilke a nice rump roast. Cut definitely makes a difference, zebrashoes. I like both pot roast and a "regular" roast - it all depends on what you're looking for. Get to be friends with your butcher. He/She will be happy to suggest a cut and how to cook it, I'm sure.

Best of luck!
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Old 12-05-2008, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Do you sear the meat before slow-cooking? Searing helps to hold in the juices. Also, choose a roast that has good marbling. They're the most tender.
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Old 12-05-2008, 07:57 PM
 
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Roasts are to be cooked low and slow, ie 225-275*, until tender. Searing doesn't hold in moisture, it just carmelizes the exterior to add flavor.

There is more to a roast, a good one, than just putting in a crock pot.(I call them "crap" pot) Silver skin is a major one to cut out, and a slow cook "melts" the fat to make it tender and juicy.

A good example is brisket. Cook it to 150/160* internal, tough/dry. Take it slower and cook to 200/210*(or when a probe goes in like butter) and you can cut it w/your finger. It just takes practice.

Just gotta do alot of reading and practice to learn how to do those tougher cuts.

Tenderloin and "prime" rib are a whole different ball game. Really not even in the same "class", imho. Low and slow works great for them but you gotta watch and take them off at the correct temp.

As Tex said, a good temp probe is well worth the money. Most meat should be cooked to temp/feel and not by time.

Just my opinon and what I've learned, ......no it doesn't work for everyone and everything.
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Old 12-05-2008, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
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This might sound weird, but trust me, the result will be fabulous. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Take a 2 to 3 pound eye of round and rub it with your favorite dry steak rub, or just salt and pepper. Turn the oven down to 475. Put the roast in the oven in a roasting pan - no water, and do not cover. Roast for 7 minutes per pound (that's not a typo - 7 minutes). Turn the oven off, but DON"T OPEN THE OVEN DOOR FOR 2 1/2 HOURS. That's it. Slice across the grain. The roast will be perfectly done, juicy and tender.
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Old 12-05-2008, 10:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janetvj View Post
This might sound weird, but trust me, the result will be fabulous. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Take a 2 to 3 pound eye of round and rub it with your favorite dry steak rub, or just salt and pepper. Turn the oven down to 475. Put the roast in the oven in a roasting pan - no water, and do not cover. Roast for 7 minutes per pound (that's not a typo - 7 minutes). Turn the oven off, but DON"T OPEN THE OVEN DOOR FOR 2 1/2 HOURS. That's it. Slice across the grain. The roast will be perfectly done, juicy and tender.

That is how I do my prime rib....let roast get to room temperature...5 minutes per lb at 500...then 20 minutes per lb. with the oven off...DO NOT OPEN THE DOOR! Comes out great!
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Old 12-05-2008, 10:59 PM
 
2,398 posts, read 3,594,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janetvj View Post
This might sound weird, but trust me, the result will be fabulous. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. Take a 2 to 3 pound eye of round and rub it with your favorite dry steak rub, or just salt and pepper. Turn the oven down to 475. Put the roast in the oven in a roasting pan - no water, and do not cover. Roast for 7 minutes per pound (that's not a typo - 7 minutes). Turn the oven off, but DON"T OPEN THE OVEN DOOR FOR 2 1/2 HOURS. That's it. Slice across the grain. The roast will be perfectly done, juicy and tender.
I'm going to try this... The roasts I've done have been hit or miss, but definitely some great tips that have already been said.
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Old 12-05-2008, 11:05 PM
 
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1) get a marbled chuck roast
2) throw it in the crock pot
3) pour a package of Dry Lipton Onion Soup and Dip Mix over it
4) pour a can of Creme of mushroom soup on top
5) surround with cut onions,potatoes,&carrots if desired.
6) let cook somewhere aoround 5-6 hours on low .

This roast makes its own gravy so it is great to serve with rice.
Super easy/supergood !!
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Old 12-06-2008, 05:50 AM
 
Location: on an island
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I agree with Capt and Nomoresnow, the tenderloin and prime rib (rated "prime" because it is the highest grade of meat) are a completely different cut from a chuck roast. They are expensive and we only eat them on special occasions.
I always have them at room temperature before putting them in the oven, and I do the 500 degree, put beef in, lower heat, don't open oven door thing.
I also use a meat thermometer.

Is eye of round considered sort of in-between? And whether it is caramelization or searing, it seems to me that this does create a barrier to keep moisture in. Also, letting the meat rest, covered, before slicing helps redistribute the juices.

To me, a chuck roast is a pot roast and needs a bit more *help* to be moist.
(Is this shoulder? Or leg? Kind of muscular, right? Hence the toughness.)
I do the low/slow Lipton onion/crock pot thing with a pot roast and/or brisket.
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