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Old 02-24-2009, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
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What kind of wine should I purchase to dilute wine vinegar(red) with?

Every bottle at the market says it is diluted to 5% acidity and most taste like diluted battery acid to me even though the red color is still deep.

I have heard that many of the wines on sale will not 'age' into vinegar the way home made wines used to.

Even the packaged salad dressings are way too sour for us and I hate that they add all that sugar to them.

I was watching a session of Jacques Pepin on dvd from my library and he said rice vinegar is not as harsh as wine vinegar, but I don't think the flavor would complement the olive oil the way a good wine vinegar should.
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Old 02-24-2009, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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Boy can I not relate. I love vinegar.

Those bottled ones don't even come close to tasting the way I think they should.

Just make your own dressing and you can control all the amounts.
I like salad dressing made 1:1 (olive oil:vinegar) because it is lower-cal and as I said, I love vinegar. I use part red wine or rice vinegar, and top it off with a little balsamic for sweetness.

Julia Child swore by the 5:1 dressing ratio, maybe you would like that. She would be appalled by mine, I find hers appalling.

Or go 6:1! 7:1! Till you find what you like. Some low-cal dressings have you replace some of the oil with chicken broth, if that is a concern.
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Old 02-24-2009, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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How Strong is the Vinegar You Can Buy at Retail?

The strength of vinegar is measured by the percent of acetic acid present in the product. All vinegar sold in the United States at the retail level should be at least 4% acidity as mandated by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA). Typical white distilled vinegar is at least 4% acidity and not more than 7%. Cider and wine vinegars are typically slightly more acidic with approximately 5-6% acidity.

From: The Vinegar Institute - Frequently Asked Questions
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Old 02-24-2009, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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Ooh, I just thought of something else..

Do you ever make dressings using citrus (lemon/lime) instead of all or part of the vinegar? Citrus is much less acidic.


I think I will stop talking to myself now..
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Old 02-24-2009, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
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Well, I guess I have two issues:

1) The vinegar that I buy at the market is too acidic for me, most being 'diluted' to 5% - what do they dilute it with, I wonder? If it is the wine that they make it with they have to be the worst grapes on God's earth.

2) When I was younger our neighbors made their own wine, and naturally, their own vinegar. We either purchased or cajoled them into parting with some vinegar and it was MUCH better than the stuff that is for sale in the stores - more flavorful.

So, because I no longer know folks who I can freeload off of, I make it which might be risky, or dilute the stuff in the market with an appropriate wine.

I don't know which is the best wine to purchase to dilute it with.

I don't think that commercial wines, the less expensive ones, will age into vinegar themselves. I don't think I can purchase commercial grape juice and age it myself. I believe any bacteria or yeast in the product is killed now to prevent 'turning' and to kill any stray and potentially harmful growth.

Oh, I kind of agree with Ms. Child: I use about three to five parts extra virgin olive oil to one part vinegar.

I like lemon juice on a salad, but to me a good oil and vinegar salad dressing will have you, having finished the salad, sopping up the remaining dressing, if any, with some crusty bread. It should taste like the grapes it came from.

So, I am wondering if anyone knows a commercial wine that is from grapes that make good vinegar. A purple or deep red sort.
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Old 02-24-2009, 10:27 PM
 
Location: USA
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I don't know of a wine that would make good vinegar but have you tried apple cider vinegar. It's not as strong as regular wine vinegar and has a much milder taste IMO.
Personally I love balsamic and my ratio is the opposite. More vinegar than oil In lieu of sugar I use honey.
Good luck in your hunt
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Old 02-24-2009, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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I start with a good olive old base and add a touch of vinegar. I add port wine, seasoning, gralic, salt to taste and then I add a touch of sugare and a little lime juice. It is neither too sweet or two sour or too citrus and it has plenty of flavor. I taste as I go; it helps.

Last edited by linicx; 02-24-2009 at 10:56 PM.. Reason: edit
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Old 02-25-2009, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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My brother's Italian father-in-law made his own red wine vinegar until the day he called them up in panic crying "I killed the mother, I killed the mother!"

I got to try it once, it was, indeed, excellent.

To the OP, I wouldn't be trying that regular (Star or Regina, e.g.) supermarket vinegar. I would look for something more expensive. They had a wonderful store for a while here in Dallas called Oil & Vinegar (it's a dutch chain, maybe in your city?) but it didn't make it, probably too expensive. They had like 16 different vinegars, or maybe more, and you could taste them all before buying. Oils too, of course. Try some of those top shelf vinegars at the fancy pants market in your area or even the regular market and see if you can't find a better one.

Maybe someday I'll make my own vinegar.. I don't know, sounds like a big project!

This website about vinegar making looks pretty interesting:

Gang of Pour - So, You Wanna Make Vinegar, Eh?
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Old 02-25-2009, 03:55 PM
 
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Use a good, dry wine instead of vinegar. You'll get your low acidity and the yummy flavor. Dry champagne is especially good.
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Old 02-25-2009, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
12,411 posts, read 9,521,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
I start with a good olive old base and add a touch of vinegar. I add port wine, seasoning, gralic, salt to taste and then I add a touch of sugare and a little lime juice. It is neither too sweet or two sour or too citrus and it has plenty of flavor. I taste as I go; it helps.
Port - yes intense flavor.
I don't use any sugar at all, which some people might not like, but I think sweetness can be got from the added wine. I think there is too much sugar added to our foods and diabetes seems to be increasing in the country.

I might add lemon juice, but I really love the wine flavor which is great to dunk bread in. I add grated cheese and onion powder.
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