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Old 06-09-2015, 08:07 AM
 
1,822 posts, read 1,393,262 times
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It's not just race here that is singular and selective, but the culture is too. I'm of the same majority race as much of the town, but it's the culture that gets me. If you're not from the state (or more broadly the area - CO/WY/NE), it will come out, and you will be seen as different. The separating of natives and "outsiders" into different groups may not consciously be going on, but it's definitely happening in the background of many minds. It's very noticeable in the work environment, with a lot of belittling of those different and "inferior". Some that move to the area may be more sensitive to it than others. The more a person comes from a more diverse area (even of just mindset and philosophies), the more the singularity of the area will be noticeable. It's good though to be able to recognize it and be aware of it. Most probably have no sense whatsoever of it occurring. All is bliss...

Last edited by Sunderpig2; 06-09-2015 at 08:48 AM..
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Old 06-17-2015, 10:42 AM
 
117 posts, read 160,386 times
Reputation: 170
To the OP:

I don't want to make your story about me, but .....

I agree with the majority of the posters. I have friends here ... who had Big City friends come to visit. They referred to Fort Collins as a "White Utopia."

It wasn't a compliment.

While our situations are different, I am what's known as "invisibly disabled." I'm medically disabled and in chronic pain, but ... for the most part ... don't look it.

And here's what happened to me as a result:

It's NFH Season.

OR

The View From the Gulag: The Destruction of a Medically Disabled Man in Colorado

Make no mistake: this is a small town ... in many negative ways ... in terms of attitudes, corruption, and cronyism, in particular. I originally assumed that the presence of CSU and the influx of people from other places would lend a much stronger cosmopolitan influence than -- in my experience -- it does.

I wish you all the luck. Truly. This town may -- literally -- have killed me, and it was due to nothing but ignorance, judgment, bullying, and talking ABOUT somebody, rather than talking TO them.

I hope you find a place where your daughters can thrive ... just absolutely thrive.

Personally, I could easily see that place NOT being Fort Collins.

Unfortunately.
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Old 07-04-2015, 04:43 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,280 times
Reputation: 22
I'm an african american male from new york who graduated from csu way back in 1970 and it dosn't seem like things have changed much. I found folks there very friendly but conservative. It's a white/latino area mostlyand the school reflects that demograph, It was a big adjustment for me and my advise is spend time in denver or start a support group so your kids won't feel isolated.
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Old 09-20-2015, 08:17 AM
 
17 posts, read 12,494 times
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What a tough challenge to contend with (your husband is gainfully employed, but your children may be in over their heads with profound culture-shock). Admire you, OP, for caring to do what's best for your daughters. I would take Lenny McBride's advice to heart, and gauge the amount of support coming in and then re-evaluate the situation and make an informed decision from there. Certainly hope your family is beginning to feel more comfortable amid your new surroundings. Good Luck!
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Old 11-10-2015, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, Co.
9 posts, read 7,874 times
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Smile Mixed Race Daughters Struggling in FTC area

Mariposa (is that your name ?) I'm from NY too. My father was in the Air Force and we moved every 2-4 yrs. As an adult, I continued to move around some, until I went back to NY to stay. I've lived in many different places, and under the circumstances, I would advise against moving to Georgia or Alabama, or frankly any southern state, except maybe Texas. There is still a problem down there for people of color, especially if you are considered or look "mixed". They still really hate that down south. I'm not saying everyone there is like that, but there are enough people who are. I am a Caucasian female with 3 mixed grandson's and 2 mixed great grandchildren. Two of my grandsons are in Texas, one great grandson (7 mo. old) lives there too. I'm not sure where my great granddaughter (8 yrs.) is living right now. My daughter doesn't exactly keep me in the loop. You see, the news about their lives usually isn't exactly good. My oldest Grandson, who was born when my daughter was 17 and living with me in NY, and then with my new husband, is in Missouri, in prison for armed robbery. We had custody of him when he was quite young, we never should have let her have him back. Anyway, this thing about people staring, and making comments, happened "around" me (not to me) in stores, etc., not only in NY, but also in Dallas. However, believe it or not, it happened more in NY than Dallas.
My daughter and the three boys lived here (FTC) for a while, when they were kids. It's obvious by looking at them, that they are mixed, and they never had any problems here ? ! Maybe because they are boy's ? I also have a chicano girlfriend with 3 daughter's, they don't seem to have any problems. Of course they are in church a lot, and have most of their friends from there. As a matter of fact, the girls just went on a Bible retreat for 3 days in the mountain's. Their church has a web site on FB, it's called : , maybe I shouldn't put that on here where anyone can see it. Let me see if there's a way for me to send you a private message. OK ? Jolae
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Old 11-24-2015, 08:56 PM
 
32 posts, read 32,704 times
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I moved from a multicultural city to suburban MN junior high and high school. Even after I experienced racism and I'm white. Apparently if you have dark hair and brown eyes you are the other to most suburban corn Feb Americans. America has been pushing around under developed countries for a hundred years so why would it be any different in the burbs if they see you as different. If you're not holding an American flag with blond hair and blue eyes you're only part American and that's the way they like it.
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Old 11-24-2015, 10:03 PM
 
922 posts, read 1,023,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakscsd View Post
Its a white city. Some of these kids have never spoken to a black person.If they look black, then they are black as far as the fort is concerned. Simply by not being white like everyone else, they are black. I doubt it will get better for them. Maybe consider moving to the Denver area where a black (or any ethnic looking) person will not be such a rarity.
This.
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Old 11-26-2015, 07:25 AM
 
457 posts, read 505,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mariposamummy View Post
Hello, all!

I know this is a strange thread to start, but I figured someone out there may be able to help me and/or provide some resources for my specific family situation. Please read my full explanation and inquiry before posting something nasty; this is a genuine question/concern, and I am not at all attempting to race bait as someone who identifies as being Caucasian, herself.

My husband and I relocated to the Fort Collins area 2 years ago, and we LOVE it. It's gorgeous, and people (for the most part) are quite friendly. However, our daughters have been struggling quite a lot with the lack of ethnic diversity. It isn't so much that they care about people's skin color, but they have been singled out quite a bit, and I've noticed that it's been having an extremely negative impact on their overall happiness and well-being.

We moved here from New York for my husband's IT job, so my girls were raised around a lot of different colors, cultures, and languages. I, myself, am mixed (mother is Columbian and father is white American), and my husband is black (African American). My daughters have not necessarily been teased or picked on in school, but a lot of classmates refer to them as black when interacting with them, and my youngest (8) has been particularly confused, because we never really used race labels with them in the past. We believe that people are people, and we're all human beings of the human race. But, they've been struggling with feeling ostracized and singled out by others here, and even when we go in public they get quite a lot of stares and random people asking to touch their long, curly hair, which is something we have never experienced before.

I've tried to explain to them that people's curiosity is not necessarily bad, but I can tell that this place has been taking its toll on them. All three were very outgoing and gregarious prior to our relocation, but they all have become reserved and hate going to public places, unless we're traveling outside of the city (i.e. Denver trip).

With all of that being explained, here is my question--for those of you who may be black/African American/mixed race, how did you adapt to being in such a non-diverse area? Are there any multicultural churches or groups around here? Although I want my daughters to learn to adapt to their surroundings, I also don't want them to continue feeling as though they are aliens. If we can't figure out a way to fix this issue, we'll likely move (which isn't an issue, and my husband has a few opportunities in Georgia and Alabama that are equally ideal to where we are now). My only concern is that I don't want to remove them from here if there's another possible solution, because we truly do love the mountains, we adore the people, and we couldn't have asked for a better community to be surrounded by. But, it seems that the lack of a black and/or biracial presence has somewhat negatively influenced how the majority of people interact with children (and perhaps adults as well) who are black/mixed race.

Thank you very much for all serious replies and attempts to help me. I'm just a concerned mother who has not yet been able to figure out a way to navigate this issue and help my daughters deal with people's (sometimes offensive) curiosity about their skin color and/or hair texture.

Love and happiness to you all!
I find this disturbing but more because my experiences in New York were that people were hell-bent on pointing out what race they thought you were on a ridiculous daily basis, like "every time they saw you" sort of thing. So, New York was anything but "good" for a dark-skinned Indian who hates being called "black" everywhere she goes. Nice to see that Fort Collins is the opposite, though, as someone who had halfway considered the main CSU campus as a possibility (looking for PhD programs in Mathematical Computational Biophysics). That could be "just as bad." Not exactly worse, but just as bad in the opposite direction.
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Old 11-26-2015, 07:27 AM
 
457 posts, read 505,793 times
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Originally Posted by Yakscsd View Post
Its a white city. Some of these kids have never spoken to a black person.If they look black, then they are black as far as the fort is concerned. Simply by not being white like everyone else, they are black. I doubt it will get better for them. Maybe consider moving to the Denver area where a black (or any ethnic looking) person will not be such a rarity.


That's EVERYWHERE, people. Even New York City. Anything not completely "white" is a "black" there too. Denver too, by the way.
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Old 11-26-2015, 07:32 AM
 
457 posts, read 505,793 times
Reputation: 399
Quote:
Originally Posted by JosieBear1951 View Post
believe it or not, it happened more in NY than Dallas.


Texas is way worse, though, by the way. The Texan attitude towards their beliefs and racist ways is way worse than New Yorkers'. At least (most) New Yorkers admit they're racist and wrong; Texans think they're RIGHT!!
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