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Old 02-18-2010, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Winder, GA
20 posts, read 30,429 times
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I am currently looking to relocate to the Loveland area from an Atlanta suburb. I have only ever lived in this area of GA and very excited about the prospect of moving. Can someone please tell me where I might find information on making the change in climate? I have no idea of the things I will NEED to live in a cold and snowy climate. I guess I will need to start with a coat and gloves...Any information you can offer will be greatly appreciated.
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Old 02-18-2010, 09:22 AM
 
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Key thing to understand is that this is a dry region, getting only 12-14 inches of precip a year, and VERY dry air; say goodbye to humidity, dog days of summer and most bugs.

It's very easy to stay warm is a cold climate that has dry air, when the sun is out you generally are fine, nothing bone chilling.

Not that much snow here, typical misconception of people back east (I was one) who see nothing on the news but snow-capped mountains and fancy ski resorts up in the High Country. We get some light powdery snow, it usually melts out when the sun hits it, you'll do fine here. Every few years we get a heavy dose, but it's quite drivable, not like the wet slushy stuff back east.

The Fort Collins area, as well as the Denver metro area, are on the far western edge of the Great Plains, so it'll be rather flat, dry, mostly brown, but with beautiful mountain views looking west. Drive a few miles into the mountains and you're in a whole other world.

Normal cold weather gear is fine here, no need to "go eskimo" with fur parkas and mukluks. Wait until you arrive to go shopping.
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Old 02-18-2010, 11:17 AM
 
2,755 posts, read 11,734,040 times
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The climate will likely be a bit of a shock to you coming from Georgia. That said, it's not nearly as bad as the temperature or snowfall would indicate due to persistent sun and dryness. As Mike said, the aridity will probably be as big of an adjustment as the cold -- a combination of dryness and elevation gives Colorado some of the driest air in the country. It's very, very dry here year-round. When you come, you must discipline yourself to drink water pretty much all day long.

Snow will be something that you'll learn to cope with, but as Mike said western snow is a bit of a different animal than eastern snow. Loveland does get its share, but the sun and dry air cause it to evaporate or melt fairly quickly (often in Colorado, snow gradually evaporates rather than actual melting into liquid water in the winter).

As for what you'll need, I'll bet whatever you have now in Georgia will be just fine -- a winter jacket, hat, and gloves work fine here. You'll be shocked that many of the locals often go out without any of the above, wearing just normal clothes outside in winter. But that may take a few years of adjustment for you coming from a warm climate.

Loveland (the "Sweetheart City") is a very attractive and nice town for the families and seniors -- most entertainment will be found in Fort Collins (15 minutes) or if not there then definitely Denver (45 minutes south). If you're into mountain recreation, Rocky Mountain National Park is just west of town. Loveland has almost no crime, excellent schools, and all the amenities that you'd expect for a small town of about 50k people (or whatever it is right now). It's a little bit too far out to be truly a suburb of Denver, although it might be considered a "suburb" of the slightly larger Fort Collins (about 120k people live there).
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Old 02-19-2010, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Winder, GA
20 posts, read 30,429 times
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Default GA to CO

Thank you Mike and TFox for your feedback. It is a relief to know that I won't need the sled dogs. I can't hardly wait for my visit next month.
Thanks again!
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Old 02-20-2010, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Northern Colorado
698 posts, read 1,705,149 times
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My parents used to live in Atlanta, and we used to visit them during the Christmas Holiday and / or spring break. There were numerous times in both December and in March when we would fly out of Atlanta where it was a cold, humid, drizzly 40 degrees. When we landed in Denver it was a warm, sunny, dry 50 degrees. The ten degree difference felt more like 20 or 30 degrees.
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Old 02-20-2010, 12:16 PM
 
3,605 posts, read 5,033,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gapeach1969 View Post
I am currently looking to relocate to the Loveland area from an Atlanta suburb. I have only ever lived in this area of GA and very excited about the prospect of moving. Can someone please tell me where I might find information on making the change in climate? I have no idea of the things I will NEED to live in a cold and snowy climate. I guess I will need to start with a coat and gloves...Any information you can offer will be greatly appreciated.
Add snow boots, wool socks, and a sweater to that. The key to enjoying cold climates in winter is dressing in layers. When you're in the sun and exercising, you feel hot. When the sun goes down, it gets cold fast. I spend a lot of time carrying around a winter coat.

Get ready for seeing snow in March and October. It's fun ! I know Denver doesn't have all that much snow compared to say New York City or Boston, but compared to Georgia it has A LOT more snow.

Also, there will be days where the temperature does not get out of the single digits, followed by days where it gets up to 65 or 70 degrees in January. It's an interesting climate.

Have fun !!!
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Old 02-20-2010, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Fort Collins, USA
1,438 posts, read 2,351,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davros View Post
Get ready for seeing snow in March and October. It's fun !
More like May and September (I won't get into the "fun" argument). Here's something interesting you may not be aware of: In January, Fort Collins has warmer average daily highs then most places in the midwest and northeast that are at the same latitude, but the average lows are substantially colder. So I think that the trick to understanding what you're in for is to realize that winter days can be on the mild side while winter nights tend to be colder then in most of the country. It averages out into a moderate winter climate. Length of winter is another matter. But it's (almost) never cold and snowy the whole winter.
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Old 02-20-2010, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Northern Colorado
698 posts, read 1,705,149 times
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"There is no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing"
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Old 02-22-2010, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Winder, GA
20 posts, read 30,429 times
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I am sort of getting the idea that it will be somewhat like living in GA-"if you don't like the weather wait a minute, because it is about to change" Will I need things like snow shovels and snow tires? Besides the new wardrobe I am trying to figure out what additional costs there will be. I am so hot natured I only have 2 sweatshirts and 1 sweater in my wardrobe. I only have a handful of long sleeve shirts. This is going to be so much fun!
Thanks to everyone for all the information. This is been so helpful.
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Old 02-22-2010, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Northern Colorado
698 posts, read 1,705,149 times
Reputation: 688
That same saying is used frequently around here, as well.
I go with all season mud and snow rated tires on my cars, as opposed to snow tires. These can be used all year.
A snow shovel is relatively inexpensive. Just get it before the first snow, because everyone else waits until the first snow falls and then they are hard to find.
Don't forget sunscreen. Being outside, even in the winter, you can get some strong sunlight at this altitude. In the winter, you also get sun reflection from the snow.
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