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Old 08-10-2012, 09:32 AM
Status: "You've grown up really crazy! - Eisley" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Deane Hill, Knoxville, Tennessee
21,686 posts, read 32,002,926 times
Reputation: 11808

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samiamnh View Post
They seem to be making a comeback......saw a couple of good sized iguana's munching my mango's when I was down in July
Oh, I'm sure. Not all of them were killed and they will come back with a vengeance.
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Old 08-10-2012, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Cape Coral, Florida
693 posts, read 906,823 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samiamnh View Post
They seem to be making a comeback......saw a couple of good sized iguana's munching my mango's when I was down in July
Really? I haven't even seen one in about 2 years.
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:27 PM
Status: "You've grown up really crazy! - Eisley" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Deane Hill, Knoxville, Tennessee
21,686 posts, read 32,002,926 times
Reputation: 11808
Until the abnormally cold month of January 2010, the population of Green Iguanas was exploding across South Florida. Wildlife experts estimated that hundreds of thousands of these reptiles were living south of Lake Okeechobee. This was due to a combination of newly released pets with a life expectancy of up to 20 years, multiple breeding periods with nests of up to 50 eggs, and years of extra mild winters south of Orlando. The recent record-breaking stretch of cold weather, however, has reduced the Green Iguana population significantly.

During abnormally cold weather, iguanas are known to modify their behavior. They will burrow underground or hide in caverns and hollows in the heat reservoirs found there. They may enter a state of partial hibernation zoologists call “brumation,” sleeping for the duration of the cold weather to conserve energy and body fluids. During this state, iguanas will appear rigid, their skin color darkened in a natural attempt to increase heat absorption. If disturbed, the reptile will not rouse. Their skin will feel cold to the touch and they will be unresponsive to pain. It can be difficult to determine if they are dead or alive!

Periods of hibernation are not normal for neo-tropical and tropical animals. If hypothermia sets in, iguanas usually die. Of those that survive, recovery may be slow and some will fall ill due to reduced immunity and organ failure. The iguanas that do make it will return to breeding soon enough, repopulating those areas suddenly devoid of exotic invaders. In time, the Green Iguana population in South Florida will be booming again.

Iguana Invasion - Exotic Pets Gone Wild in Florida - Iguanas and Lizards

So the iguana didn't "come back to life," Billy, he was simply hibernating!
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Old 08-11-2012, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Cape Coral, Florida
693 posts, read 906,823 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
Until the abnormally cold month of January 2010, the population of Green Iguanas was exploding across South Florida. Wildlife experts estimated that hundreds of thousands of these reptiles were living south of Lake Okeechobee. This was due to a combination of newly released pets with a life expectancy of up to 20 years, multiple breeding periods with nests of up to 50 eggs, and years of extra mild winters south of Orlando. The recent record-breaking stretch of cold weather, however, has reduced the Green Iguana population significantly.

During abnormally cold weather, iguanas are known to modify their behavior. They will burrow underground or hide in caverns and hollows in the heat reservoirs found there. They may enter a state of partial hibernation zoologists call “brumation,” sleeping for the duration of the cold weather to conserve energy and body fluids. During this state, iguanas will appear rigid, their skin color darkened in a natural attempt to increase heat absorption. If disturbed, the reptile will not rouse. Their skin will feel cold to the touch and they will be unresponsive to pain. It can be difficult to determine if they are dead or alive!

Periods of hibernation are not normal for neo-tropical and tropical animals. If hypothermia sets in, iguanas usually die. Of those that survive, recovery may be slow and some will fall ill due to reduced immunity and organ failure. The iguanas that do make it will return to breeding soon enough, repopulating those areas suddenly devoid of exotic invaders. In time, the Green Iguana population in South Florida will be booming again.

Iguana Invasion - Exotic Pets Gone Wild in Florida - Iguanas and Lizards

So the iguana didn't "come back to life," Billy, he was simply hibernating!
Hahaha I knew that I was just being facetious.
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Old 08-11-2012, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Meredith NH
843 posts, read 1,093,148 times
Reputation: 529
Thanks for the lesson,Hik......very interesting and informative.I'm glad to see them back because they are useful in tormenting my grandchildren.
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Old 08-12-2012, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Cape Coral, Florida
693 posts, read 906,823 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samiamnh View Post
Thanks for the lesson,Hik......very interesting and informative.I'm glad to see them back because they are useful in tormenting my grandchildren.
I don't mind them either. They can be messy, but that's about it. They are vegetarians so they don't really pose a huge threat to the ecosystem like the monitors, snakehead fish, and pythons.
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Old 08-12-2012, 02:27 PM
Status: "You've grown up really crazy! - Eisley" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Deane Hill, Knoxville, Tennessee
21,686 posts, read 32,002,926 times
Reputation: 11808
Yeah, the monitors and pythons. They freak me out. Snakehead fish? That's a new one on me.

Came across this, yesterday. Airboat captain lost his hand to a gator.

Everglades airboat captain who lost hand to alligator faces charges | The News-Press | news-press.com

The article said what I did.

“Alligators have a natural fear of humans,” said Weathers, who often swims in the Everglades’ alligator-infested waters. “If they see us, they take off. They see us as these giants hovering over them. They’re not going to attack unless they’ve been fed.”
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Cape Coral, Florida
693 posts, read 906,823 times
Reputation: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
Yeah, the monitors and pythons. They freak me out. Snakehead fish? That's a new one on me.

Came across this, yesterday. Airboat captain lost his hand to a gator.

Everglades airboat captain who lost hand to alligator faces charges | The News-Press | news-press.com

The article said what I did.

“Alligators have a natural fear of humans,” said Weathers, who often swims in the Everglades’ alligator-infested waters. “If they see us, they take off. They see us as these giants hovering over them. They’re not going to attack unless they’ve been fed.”
They are an invasive species which have most likely been introduced by the Asian community for their "medicinal" properties. They eat any and everything and are killing off native fish, lizards, snakes, etc. They are a much bigger problem in Northern and Central Florida.
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