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Old 04-26-2018, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Deep 13
1,110 posts, read 883,728 times
Reputation: 3364

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Have a corner freshwater lot. Roughly 225 feet of seawall needed.

Just trying to see what a rough price for that would be. I know the local contractors are up to their earballs with repairs and such and I hate pestering them for an estimate that might be 5 years down the road.

Yes, prices will change in 5 years, but just looking for a ballpark cost to budget for.

There is a fair amount of 'overage' that extends from the property line to the waterline. Of course, it costs more to move more soil, but how much of cutting back the bank is part of the total cost? Can said soil be used as fill for the house?

Can the seawall cost be rolled into a construction loan?

Also, it's my understanding that freshwater can have a retaining wall style or an 'engineered bank'.

Thanks.
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Old 04-27-2018, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Cape Coral
195 posts, read 177,123 times
Reputation: 207
There is not an easy "ball park" answer to this question.
That is why you need to contact a company that is reputable in building seawalls.

Here is the problem. There are different conditions at each property. One big factor is the conditions under where the seawall is constructed. It will depend on the amount of rock foundation and what will it take to get the wall in.
One lot may cost $25,000 another on the same canal may cost $60,000.
Only the contractor can determine what the situation requires.

In Cape Coral, all canal properties must have a seawall to build a house.
It can be cement, rip rap or corrugated. The price will vary depending on the material.
Many canal lots do need vegetation removed and that may require an assessment of type and a permit to remove.
Always depend on a knowledgeable professional to give you the information.
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Old 04-27-2018, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Cape Coral
296 posts, read 372,402 times
Reputation: 309
Yep and if the vegetation is a type of Mangrove, it can take up to a year for approval, as in the case of a friends lot off Gulfstream. Applied for a Seawall Permit, inspector found one small Red Mangrove plant about 3 feet tall. Lee County approved it, Army Corps of Engineers would not. Not until they paid more money to a foundation. Then it was approved, after an 11 month wait.
Several Firms that will do an inspection of a prospective lot, before you buy. They will tell you if their are protected species residing on the property. Cape Coral has many protected species of turtles, and Burrowing Owls, not to mention vegetation like 3 Different varieties of Mangroves. They can make you lot unbuildable at the worst, to a costly relocation project at best. Since you already own the lot, guess its too late for that, but if you are building in 5 Years, you might want to start the permitting process now. LOL...... Seriously Good luck with your build.
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Old 04-28-2018, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Deep 13
1,110 posts, read 883,728 times
Reputation: 3364
I know that different canal fronts will cost different amounts. I did a rough measure of the west bank and it's about 25 feet away from my property line for it's 125 foot length. That is a boat-load of soil that needs to be removed; which is going to cost more.

Vegetation doesn't seem to to be too horrendous. No forest, maybe one, two tree/bushes among the normal scrub. There is a palm tree that needs to come out, but I would imagine someone could dig it out and take it home with them - not worried at this time about anything growing 20 feet.

I know about the owl schedule and that's easy enough to work around. I called out for the turtles to come to me, but either they move real slow, don't care, or were visiting their owl friends, so I didn't see any.

In the next year or two I'll call Honc and have someone come out and give me that professional ballpark; it's just right now I feel bad about bothering them. There are some new construction houses down the dead end canal that all got basic sea wallls and they were listed in the $230k range, how much of that price was sea wall construction, I'll probably never know. I was just hoping someone would post what was needed to be done and how much it cost them.
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Old 04-28-2018, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Cape Coral
390 posts, read 409,467 times
Reputation: 347
The lesson here is to douse the entire property with roundup and dcon before applying for a permit. ^.^
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Old 04-30-2018, 09:12 AM
 
47 posts, read 27,495 times
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As a idea. Last year in Charlotte County in SGC when we were looking, people were tell us that a Rip Rap wall was running $125 per running foot. A Cement Sea Wall was running $225 a running foot. Never got into the details as we ended up going in another direction.
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Old 05-08-2018, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Deep 13
1,110 posts, read 883,728 times
Reputation: 3364
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoSnow4me View Post
The lesson here is to douse the entire property with roundup and dcon before applying for a permit. ^.^
That thought had crossed my mind (not the dcon part). Buy big jugs of Ortho's GroundClear and go to town. Probably would still get charged for mowing by the city. Probably not the best thing for the canals, but I'm sure there is worse things in that water.

Speaking of canals (and a shameless bump of my thread), how is the water holding up in different parts of town? I figure the saltwater levels are normal because ocean, but are there areas that dry up before others? What's the lowest levels anyone has seen?

I thought about starting a new thread about the drought and the wells and the canals, but it looks like rain forecasted for a week or so, so all that stinky mud will be forgotten and the media will move on to Hurricane Season and the state of seawall repairs.
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Old 05-09-2018, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Cape Coral
296 posts, read 372,402 times
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The low water you see on the news and TV are freshwater canals. Our canal is salt/brackish and has its usual rise and fall with the tides. No problems. The freshwater canals are also used in some communities for irrigation, that contributes the lower levels especially at the end of the winter before the rainy season. Happens every winter.....once it starts raining, they will start talking about Hurricanes.
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Old 06-15-2018, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Deep 13
1,110 posts, read 883,728 times
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Just for giggles, I contacted Honc to ask about an estimate for a seawall on a freshwater canal. I knew the price would be high on account of the overage and being a corner lot, but.....wow....

Granted, it's a kick-butt seawall. Maybe a bit a bit overkill, but I think of it as a worse case scenario. Other than putting in patios, it will only be cheaper with alternate construction materials. Remember this is all based on 250 linear feet of rocky canal.

Permit - $450
Clearing bank of vegetation - $3000
Digging back bank to property line (22 feet) - $16,000
250 feet of trenching to accept seawall panels - $4000
250 feet of 7000psi re-enforced 8 foot by 5 inch panels (with deadmans) - $32,500
5 foot return slabs at each of wall - $1300
Of course, surprises are extra!

Rough total - $57,000
Adding a patio would roughly be another $5000.

Not exactly the news I was hoping for. Maybe $40k +/-. I knew the overage was going to hurt.

The question is now: is it worth it? What sort of return can I see with such an investment? I know won't get everything back that we put into it. Granted, we didn't do a whole lot of due diligence with this other than the assessment, but it was more an exercise in retirement financial focusing. We aren't set on the lot, or Cape Coral, and we feel that we will can sell it for what we have invested in it so far.

I know everyone has different priorities and budgets, but what's your gut feeling?
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Old 06-16-2018, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Cape Coral
195 posts, read 177,123 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brucifer View Post
Just for giggles, I contacted Honc to ask about an estimate for a seawall on a freshwater canal. I knew the price would be high on account of the overage and being a corner lot, but.....wow....

Granted, it's a kick-butt seawall. Maybe a bit a bit overkill, but I think of it as a worse case scenario. Other than putting in patios, it will only be cheaper with alternate construction materials. Remember this is all based on 250 linear feet of rocky canal.

Permit - $450
Clearing bank of vegetation - $3000
Digging back bank to property line (22 feet) - $16,000
250 feet of trenching to accept seawall panels - $4000
250 feet of 7000psi re-enforced 8 foot by 5 inch panels (with deadmans) - $32,500
5 foot return slabs at each of wall - $1300
Of course, surprises are extra!

Rough total - $57,000
Adding a patio would roughly be another $5000.

Not exactly the news I was hoping for. Maybe $40k +/-. I knew the overage was going to hurt.

The question is now: is it worth it? What sort of return can I see with such an investment? I know won't get everything back that we put into it. Granted, we didn't do a whole lot of due diligence with this other than the assessment, but it was more an exercise in retirement financial focusing. We aren't set on the lot, or Cape Coral, and we feel that we will can sell it for what we have invested in it so far.

I know everyone has different priorities and budgets, but what's your gut feeling?
Not every lot will run into those numbers, yet I have also seen higher figures.
That is why I don't quote numbers, but suggest asking a professional who does the work.
I have seen much lower figures also.
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