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Old 06-27-2007, 11:32 PM
 
2 posts, read 21,818 times
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We're looking at homes in these cities. Can someone comment on the differences and similarities of the two? I heard a Realtor say that Colleyville is more laid back while Southlake is more uptight. I didn't get a chance to ask her to elaborate. Can anyone shed some light on this comment? Thanks for any input.
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Old 06-28-2007, 09:22 AM
 
55 posts, read 312,850 times
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Default Here is what I know

I live in Colleyville. The biggest difference to me is that Southlake SHOPPING has exploded. They have every retail and service imaginable. Many upscale, and in very well-laid out shopping centers. Colleyville has little shopping but Southlake is within minutes drive. Colleyville is slower, peaceful, less traffic congestion. Both are top notch in terms of real estate values, family and quality of life and schools. EXCELLENT schools. You will have to visit and see for yourself how they are different. It will depend largely on your preference for the town feel. Basically you cant go wrong with either choice.
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Old 06-28-2007, 11:31 AM
 
Location: TX
145 posts, read 568,907 times
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I agree with everything "jehnifer" said. Due to more shopping and retail, Southlake has alot more traffic than in Colleyville. To me, Colleyville has a sort of "country estates" feel to it; it's retained a tiny bit of it's old rural character. Whereas, Southlake is more "noveau riche". But, both have beautiful neighborhoods and great school districts. They're right next door to each other; you'll be in and out of each city regularly.
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Old 06-28-2007, 09:28 PM
 
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Default Thanks, Jehnifer and Sky,

We've noticed the development in Southlake. It's amazing. We've lived in Dallas for a long time and have always admired the beautiful neighborhoods in Colleyville. Now with a couple of toddlers, the schools make it even more appealing. We did not realize until recently that Southlake has much the same to offer. We're still exploring, but we're really excited about relocating in one or the other. We're still curious why Southlake has attracted all the development considering that Colleyville has similar demographics and seemingly a head start in growth. Anyway, thanks again for the input.
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Old 06-29-2007, 07:34 AM
 
27,455 posts, read 44,947,050 times
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Colleyville does not have near the retail that Southlake has (and it won't) No place to build really. Hwy 26 is main driveshaft through Colleyville and it is about the undergo widening that will make it really difficult to get to the ratail that is there...Colleyvilkle mindset is upscale retail which really has a hard time making any profit--many small, independent stores are having trouble keeping open--some restaurants have same trouble--so while the health clubs and grocerty store like Market Street seem to be doing ok--there are other places not in such good shape--
Southlake has 114 access and 1709 which as much as people trash talk it--is a good traffic artery across Southlake/Keller area and allows access from several different N/S streets from the southern mid-cities...so there is good traffic flow most of the time...Southlake's later development was really a bonus because there was the land and the major traffic arteries which conspired together to allow large shopping centers close to residential areas but also isolated from most of the residential in Southlake---people in other areas can get there as well--so it has become a mecca of shopping....

Southlake watches their building code and the people on their city council are pretty smart and really do make sure that development will have long term desireability not just short term shot to the tax base...the new townhouse development around southlake center was really smart--there is no apt development in Southlake--that was an investors dream--some place to buy and then rent out to singles/couples who could not afford to buy home but want to live in Southlake area--maybe who grew up there...
the first set were all gone before the buildng even started

resale is the real reason to buy in one of those towns--if you get a decent house in decent neighborhood, you won't have any problem selling you home with appreciation value probably in the future...

if schools are important to you then Colleyville and Southlake appear to be best choice...other towns in area and school districts can be just as good in specific locations but they don't have the "cachet" that colleyville and southlake have which drives their market...

Southlake housing is driven tremendously by the rising home prices of new construction which is making all new homes at least $750+===there are 48 homes for sale in Southlake over 2 MILLION--for a small geographical area that is a ton of homes in the price range--right now, 3 of them are under contract....but their prices support and drive up the smaller, older, less expensive homes---which is what parents of most younger children can afford...that is why the 400-550 maket is SO competitive in Southlake and Colleyville---houses go on the market and if they have a decent floor plan and have been updated pretty well--they sell within 10 days probably....home with problems take longer and depends on what the problems are as to how long....

it is just a very vicious market---I know a couple who moved from Shreveport about 6 mo ago and have apt w/2 large dogs who have tried to buy 3 or 4 homes in their price range with floor plan they want in past 6 mo and each time they have waited to long and house was under contract w/backups...sometimes only a couple of days after listing....

so if you are serious about looking in this area--visit homes in your price range on line--see what local schools they are zoned for and get info about them--decide what floor plan arrangement works for you--and educate yourself about the market--drive through neighborhoods of homes you like---find a subdivision or two that you really like adn focus on them...

then just pounce on the first home you like the day it comes on the market--many times people know when someone in area is going to sell and tell friends that are looking and the house has buyer before it goes into MLS---so it is very frustrating for people who are coming from out of town or are working and can't take off the day a house comes on the market to view it...
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Old 06-29-2007, 10:30 AM
 
Location: TX
3,029 posts, read 10,444,773 times
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IF the job comes through these areas are our top 2 (Colleyville being #1 due to closer location to downtown etc...)

But since we are losing money on our house here we can't go for a house over 400k. so, I need back up options since housing in these two areas are tight.

so what order would you put our back up options?
critereia: if not top two price willing to pay will drop to 350K
also schools for kids ages 7, 10 and 13.

Keller, Grapevine, Aledo, Haslet, Flowermound

thanks so much!!
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Old 06-29-2007, 11:04 AM
 
27,455 posts, read 44,947,050 times
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Grepevine is still Colleyville schools but some areas in grapevine are iffy --lower income apartment dwellers and housing that is probably below the Colleyville standard itself...
main drawback to grapevine housing to me is that few homes offer 3 car garages, lots are smaller than southlake/colleyville homes and most construction was done by tract builders so there is little variety and frankly the developments don't hold up as well...

If you are working in FTW--Flower Mound is NOT an easy commute--only one way in or out and that is busy hiway w/traffic jams during commute time...

Haslet--growing big time--retail getting better but stll pretty isolated, no real hospital out that way, could be county services instead of a city police/fire
and depending on where you are, secondary roads leave a lot to be desired...mainly in Northwest ISD which will also be growing--right now it is avg or above district--but growing spurts make quality had to maintain--new teachers/students from who knows where--lots of variables...usually have to travel I 35 into FTW which is pain in the ...

Aledo--spread out--much less upscale retail/commercial--think hospital is not as good as those in Mid Cities--few trees--lots of gas well drilling out there--schools more sports oriented than academically from what I hear...development/tract builders are usually local companies....

Keller--between I 35 and 377 tract developments around 300--FTW city limits but Keller mailing address--Keller schools--lots of foreclosures and pre-forclosures--hard to resell a home there now...some people might see it as opportunity to get better deal on house--realtors usually very glad to get contract on listing there ---rail road runs through part of that area and can be VERY noise/busy....in Keller city limits most new construction is over 550 ... older neighborhoods can have homes in your price range--just make sure to check the local schools--KISD went through big problem this past school year w/superintendent and some board members--lots of conflict--he stayed and some of them were not reelected--more board members from the FTW side of school district now so changes should happen this next year...will have to build more schools--taxes could go up more...Keller ISD taxes are second to Carroll ISD/Southlake--expensive...

For 350 there are homes in all of the towns you asked about...just have to evaluate where the house is and what it has vs other choices...not easy
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Old 06-29-2007, 12:19 PM
 
Location: TX
3,029 posts, read 10,444,773 times
Reputation: 1361
Thanks for all the info.

I know Haslet and Aledo are still pretty rural as shopping goes and thats really ok with me. As long as I have a grocery store I'm good!

Quote:
main drawback to grapevine housing to me is that few homes offer 3 car garages, lots are smaller than southlake/colleyville homes and most construction was done by tract builders so there is little variety and frankly the developments don't hold up as well...
Thnaks this is great info...I wondered why with the same schools Grapevine was not considered "up" with Colleyville. I really don't want cheap tract housing. (I have that here in NOVA by Pulte )

I would consider Coppell but...my sis lives there and that would seriously be too close! (we haven't lived in hte same state in 20 years!! so being near by is good...neighbors TOO close!)

Also I don't need new. (no huge tract neighborhoods) more established neighborhoods with good schools larger lots are what we seek. (under 60min commute to downtown FW)
That's why I love Colleyville.

Quote:
---rail road runs through part of that area and can be VERY noise/busy....
AGAIN excellent info... from online this info is hard to come by! A train running a few streets away is a definate no! Same as a freeway. I like quiet!

so any other areas I'm missing? Schools are the number 1 priority. commute #2.
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Old 06-29-2007, 01:12 PM
 
55 posts, read 312,850 times
Reputation: 34
Default Keep thinking Colleyville

We recently bought a 4000 s.f. 5 bedroom home in Colleyville for $350,000 in a very nice Mill Valley neighborhood next to the Nature Center. The house was in immacualte move in condition with lovely yard.
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Old 07-01-2007, 11:47 PM
 
43 posts, read 273,905 times
Reputation: 32
Hi all - we're moving to the Southlake / Colleyville area in about 1 month from Australia! We are so excited but also incredibly freaked out - it's a big move. I'm curious if anyone can help me with commute times. We don't know yet if we'll be in Ft. Worth or Dallas, so part of the allure of these two areas is that it is centrally located. Do you know what the commutes would be from both areas to D & FW? I looked at another website that said that it takes less time to get to both D & FW from Southlake than Colleyville - how can that be? On a map Colleyville looks closer...is there a problem with freeway access?
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