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Old 08-07-2010, 03:05 PM
 
176 posts, read 493,625 times
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My current refrigerator works OK, but uses a lot of electricity. Any thoughts on the economics of replacing a refrigerator to save electricity? It would take several years for the savings to be worth it and frankly I am worried about how long refrigerators last. When I was growing up refrigerators routinely lasted 20 to 30 years, but nowadays so many things seem to be cheap junk and don't last very long at all.

Any thoughts?

PS. Anyone following the energy bills in Congress? If they pass will they provide big rebates for energy saving refrigerators?
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Old 08-07-2010, 04:46 PM
 
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If it's an older model it might pay off after about 5-10 years. Try to replace it before it breaks. Not only do you save on spoiled food, but your utility might be willing to pay for junking an inefficient but working one. The energy saving tax break expired earlier, no word on whether a new one will come.
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Old 08-07-2010, 05:00 PM
f_m
 
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Also, check with your local utility which might offer other rebates. Usually it's best to keep things while they are still working. Can you get a number for how much electricity it uses for comparison purposes?
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Old 08-07-2010, 05:19 PM
 
689 posts, read 2,723,754 times
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In some ways this reminds me of one of my best friends holding off replacing his hot water tank that was 12 years old because it was still working he just mentally couldn't bring himself to replace it.
Never mind that at that age and the fact he never flushed it periodically, it was probably only 50% efficient at that point.
You know the story .... It gave up the Ghost at an extremely bad time and Murphy's law left him with a mess on a holiday weekend and no hot water to boot.
When it was all over it cost him dearly.
Lesson learned ?????

Sell your old one on craigs list or, and apply that money toward your choice of a new energy efficient New one with possible rebates.
Do your research carefully.
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Old 08-07-2010, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 17,029,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PastTense01 View Post
My current refrigerator works OK, but uses a lot of electricity. Any thoughts on the economics of replacing a refrigerator to save electricity? It would take several years for the savings to be worth it and frankly I am worried about how long refrigerators last. When I was growing up refrigerators routinely lasted 20 to 30 years, but nowadays so many things seem to be cheap junk and don't last very long at all.

Any thoughts?

PS. Anyone following the energy bills in Congress? If they pass will they provide big rebates for energy saving refrigerators?
It's better IMO to keep what you already own if it still functions efficiently. Otherwise, it's wise to replace it but don't expect long life as the old one.
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Old 08-07-2010, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
1,142 posts, read 2,453,539 times
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We were thinking about doing the same thing. Our fridge is 10 years old and the seal around the freezer is going. I can feel the cold air against my arm when I stand near it.

I agree with the other posters, replace it and take advantage of the rebate and energy effiency. Just watch what size you buy. After we shopped in several stores looking at new fridges, I found that most of the new ones were either smaller inside than my current one, or just the same size. They make the outside look larger without changing the inside space.
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Old 08-08-2010, 07:28 AM
 
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An Octopus gravity furnace, once very common, is very durable. There are some still in use from the 1920's. But it is extremely inefficient, only 50% of the heat goes into the occupied areas. Modern furnaces are 80-90% efficient. So the old furnace would have cost more despite durability. And the same is true of refrigerators.
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Old 08-08-2010, 07:54 AM
Status: "The weather is beautiful:)" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,369 posts, read 25,524,356 times
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When you replace yours make sure you go for as small as you can and get the freezer on top not a side by side. Those are less energy efficient.

Also your new one may be more energy efficient but you may not save any money because newer appliances don't last as long as older ones. Expect to replace your new one multiple times compared to your old one. So your "energy" savings might be eaten up with replacement costs.



Try this site...it might help.

http://www.energystar.gov/
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Old 08-08-2010, 09:45 AM
 
Location: In America's Heartland
929 posts, read 1,825,995 times
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I just replaced a 30 year fridge after it died. I really doubt I get 30 years out of this new one, but I can always hope. I've seen some small savings each month, but it will take about 10-12 years for a payback. For what I paid for this fridge, I purchased a fridge, range, washer and dryer in 1981.
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Old 08-08-2010, 02:13 PM
 
176 posts, read 493,625 times
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As to what I have now: It is a Amana refrigerator purchased in October, 1996. Plugging in a Kill-a-Watt meter it looks like I am using about 1300 Kilowatt hours a year at about $.13 each, thus a yearly cost of about $169.
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