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Old 02-10-2011, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,955 posts, read 17,609,912 times
Reputation: 7193

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Themanwithnoname View Post
...Many of us refuse to live in stinking, crowded cities.

To say nothing of living a life where our freedom (Of movement) is restricted


Buddy of mine says a "Man" will have three things to be a truly free man:
A Weapon to defend himself, his loved ones, and his possessions.
Land, so he can do WTF he wants.. (Man, castle etc)
A vehicle so he can go where he pleases, when he pleases.


Something to that...
yes, there is "Something to that..."

That something is an alternative way to travel. You are correct when you used the term "Vehicle" since not only are cars vehicles so are Bicycles according to all 50 states vehicle laws.

If you remember, if you don't have a car all that is left is to walk, or ride either a bicycle, a horse or , if you have it available, mass transit.

 
Old 02-10-2011, 04:19 PM
 
5,610 posts, read 8,504,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
yes, there is "Something to that..."

That something is an alternative way to travel. You are correct when you used the term "Vehicle" since not only are cars vehicles so are Bicycles according to all 50 states vehicle laws.

If you remember, if you don't have a car all that is left is to walk, or ride either a bicycle, a horse or , if you have it available, mass transit.

I bicycled a portion of the Natchez Trace.

40miles a day...


Not gonna use that as my primary. (And this doesn't mention poor weather, what you do when you break a leg etc)
 
Old 02-10-2011, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,628 posts, read 23,594,636 times
Reputation: 30269
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
Why did you single out Pittsburgh?
It actually has mass transit, cabs and ZipCars available.
Plus it is becoming very bicycle friendly....
Sorry, I didn't mean that public transportation wasn't available in Pitt. My nephew went to school there and I was just thinking about the steep hills.

That woman would be able to crack coconuts with her thighs if she lived in Mt. Washington and cycled around town.
 
Old 02-10-2011, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,625,818 times
Reputation: 32287
Default Basic premise flawed!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
Total up how much you spend on cars/trucks (add everything not just gas) you own then read the story to see if you can keep all that car $$$$ for yourself...........

You will find that total to be shocking kings ransom!
Whatever the arguments for and against living a car/truck-free life, the idea that very much money is involved is completely ludicrous. Provided, that is, that one has a reasonable car - not a sport-ute, not a BMW, not a Lexus, not a Mercedes, etc. Suppose you even bought brand-new. Something like a Ford Focus for $12,000 and then kept it for 12 years. Even assuming zero value at the end of 12 years, that's only $1000 a year for depreciation! Car insurance, gas, repairs, tires are not really very much. I just drove 4,600 miles on a trip and spent only $600 for gas, and if I'd had a Prius it would have been half that! You'd have to be totally destitute to be tempted to give up your car just to save money.
 
Old 02-10-2011, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,431 posts, read 41,537,922 times
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Completely unrealistic for rural and small town dwellers. I lived very urban, and didn't have a car when I did, and was fine. I've been both ends of the spectrum.
 
Old 02-10-2011, 08:17 PM
 
5,610 posts, read 8,504,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Completely unrealistic for rural and small town dwellers. I lived very urban, and didn't have a car when I did, and was fine. I've been both ends of the spectrum.

I've been at duty stations and posting where I did not have a vehicle for one reason or another.

Quality of life SUCKED!

Just before a deployment I walked 45 minutes one way for Burger King.

I wanted it and knew it would be a LONG time until I got another chance.

Since Motorcycles, I've known you could pick up a 'get me around' for LESS than $2K and insurance is about $20 a month.... ( I do full coverage for every bike except my Enduro... I have $1150 in it and parts are cheap)

Heck, I'd have atleast a bike even if I were homeless!
 
Old 02-10-2011, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,431 posts, read 41,537,922 times
Reputation: 50014
I was completely fine when I lived in my former city with no car. I borrowed a sibling's car for a long weekend once while there to move, and it was way more of a hassle to have to find legal, safe, vandalism-free parking (all parking is street parking there) than to just not have a car and take the bus and train/subway system. Add in the city parking permit fees, the insurance hike, and the jacked up cost of fuel, there, and owning a car there was FAR more trouble than it was worth. Going carless there was done at really no hindrance to quality of life. The only slight inconvenience was grocery shopping, and I made sure to live walkably from a market, and problem solved.

In my current city, this is not the case. You would be paralyzed here without a car. For being a decently sized urban center, it is a VERY, VERY car-centered society. There is no rail transit system whatsoever, be it heavy, light, or commuter rail, and every time it's proposed, it's shot down. People just love their cars, here, and the metro's HUMONGOUSLY spread out, so walking and biking aren't realistic options. There is a limited bus system, but it doesn't get used, really, except in very poor neighborhoods, and they're always cutting service for this reason.

It really just depends on what the culture of a city is, and if it's particularly friendly to public transit. Motorcycles and scooters here aren't a great option, either. Due to climate, you'd not be able to use them for a large chunk of the year. I've known people who've had them as primary trans, and they're the ones having to bum rides a good portion of the year due to seasonal weather issues. Snow and ice are of course the main culprits...but you've also never lived until you've raced a tornado on a Vespa, clad in a makeshift garbage bag poncho.
 
Old 02-11-2011, 09:41 AM
 
5,019 posts, read 12,705,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaseMan View Post
Most of these types of articles are written by people living in major cities on the coasts. For someone in a small town in the Midwest it's completely impractical to consider.
We live in a town of 40K in Indiana with only one (shared) car.
It takes some planning and some lifestyle adjustments, but it can be done. It also helps to be healthy and physically fit. Proably won't work so well for the "average" overweight smoker for instance.

My daughter is car-free in Pittsburgh.
 
Old 02-11-2011, 10:21 AM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,727,499 times
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I think it would be difficult for my suburban family to go completely car-free, but we have managed to get down to one car. It took several years of planning, a job change, and a move to pull it off. All in all, it's been well worth the trouble.

Most days my spouse rides his bike to the light rail, which drops him a block from his current workplace. Our car is an older sedan, which gets fairly good gas mileage and costs little to maintain (Thank you, Honda!) and even less to insure. The grocery, library, and school are walkable. Even my hair stylist and dentist are walkable.

I have our milk order delivered from the regional dairy, and once a month or so I drive across town to stock up on bulk foods like grains, beans, and pasta. I also buy several whole chickens for the freezer. Every few days I walk the few blocks to the market for veggies and perhaps some fish.

Children's activities are sometimes walkable, sometimes not. We carpool with friends when necessary and thank the drivers with lunch, a plate of cookies, or an invitation for their kids to sleepover so they can have time alone.

Emergencies have happened with our kids, and there hasn't always been a car available. When it was serious, we called an ambulance. When it was urgent, but not life-threatening, I called my spouse, who returned as quickly as possible. Although it hasn't been necessary yet, I also have a network of friends who I'm absolutely certain would be willing to help in an emergency.

We shop for kids' clothing only a few times a year. I keep a minimal wardrobe, and my favorite clothier is within walking distance. My spouse orders his work clothes from LLBean or Lands' End.

I think the most important thing I want to mention is that we decided that we wanted to live this way and then set about making the necessary changes. We didn't just get rid of the second car, because that would have thrown our lives into complete chaos. But now that the transition is complete, I'm really glad we did it.
 
Old 02-11-2011, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,955 posts, read 17,609,912 times
Reputation: 7193
After peak oil we all will need to re-think our transportation...........

WikiLeaks cables: Saudi Arabia cannot pump enough oil to keep a lid on prices | Business | The Guardian
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