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Old 11-22-2011, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,958 posts, read 8,051,214 times
Reputation: 7193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
A pet peeve of mine is forced obsolescence...

I take very good care of what I have...

The problem is regulations.

Still have the 72 Plymouth Valiant I drove back in school... the State sends me a notice every year to crush it so I can do my part for the environment.

Diesel Equipment is being forced out of State... a Mom and Pop excavating contractor recently closed up shop... his Backhoe and Dump Truck are meticulously maintained... he bought both new. The State informed him that he will be breaking the law because his engines have been deemed non-compliant... really gets my dander up.

I have an older propane grill with spare tanks... well, this is now also obsolete...

Anyone see a pattern here?

How about my little Sony Battery TV??? there is no way to hook up a digital convertor box that runs on a batteries... they don't even make one...

So all the small portable TV's are now useless.

It is even worse with Medical Equipment... manufacturers drop lines all the time...

How would you like to be a Hospital spending 40k per operating room table to find out 5 years later the line is discontinued with no company support?

Of course the company will gladly give a quote for their new super duper model...
No one knew just how fast tech would advance. No one. So now we play catch up and hope we can save the day. Some people are going to get hurt but few people would think ahead being content with the status quo.

I,too, hate it when the tech I own goes obsolete but I have learned to limit my tech gadgets to low end or refurb equipment to deal with the necessary obsolescence required to even have tech to use.

Some tech , the polluting kind, will have to go bye bye if we are to breath in the near future like it or not.

The real trick here is thinking through to find those things that can be made to last in spite of all the tech advances and that varies from person to person.
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Old 11-23-2011, 02:28 PM
 
8,270 posts, read 5,930,402 times
Reputation: 4599
Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
YET, I love IKEA, and think IKEA gets a bad rap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Do people actually have problems with Ikea furniture falling apart?
There's some extraordinarily cheap stuff that is a bit flimsy, but generally it's pretty solid and can cope with being disassembled and reassembled a few times without any issues. I have several pieces from IKEA, they are 15+ years old, and they do not fall apart or look distressed.
I like it too.

The bed/dressers/nightstands in our bedroom are Ikea, over seven years old of daily use and they all look the same as new, feel solid, the drawers roll out as easily and lock into place as tightly as ever. I don't think it is something I'd plan on passing to future generations but unless I got really lucky on all the pieces the whole "Ikea falls apart" thing is kinda suspect.
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Old 11-23-2011, 04:30 PM
 
13,830 posts, read 25,320,891 times
Reputation: 8037
Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
I like it too.

The bed/dressers/nightstands in our bedroom are Ikea, over seven years old of daily use and they all look the same as new, feel solid, the drawers roll out as easily and lock into place as tightly as ever. I don't think it is something I'd plan on passing to future generations but unless I got really lucky on all the pieces the whole "Ikea falls apart" thing is kinda suspect.
I've seen some of the complaints and the problem was in the assembly...
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Old 11-24-2011, 10:16 AM
 
8,270 posts, read 5,930,402 times
Reputation: 4599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
I've seen some of the complaints and the problem was in the assembly...
They are doing it the wrong way.

What we do is hire an Ikea assembly consultant, these guys are from a small group that grew up working in the original factory in Sweden and have made this their life's work, they are old world craftsmen at assembling these things and are required to undergo 200 hours per year of training to keep up on the latest technologies in things like particle board and twist lock bolts. Make sure you get a guy from the official Ikea Assemblers guild though, there are knockoff companies that send Germans who fake Swedish accents.

We fly him out from Sweden, put him up in a local hotel, and he comes over to assemble our stuff in an afternoon. We also spend the extra to have him bring titanium versions of all the assembly hardware, you don't want to skimp on that stuff.
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Old 11-24-2011, 01:49 PM
 
13,830 posts, read 25,320,891 times
Reputation: 8037
Quote:
Originally Posted by slackjaw View Post
They are doing it the wrong way.

What we do is hire an Ikea assembly consultant, these guys are from a small group that grew up working in the original factory in Sweden and have made this their life's work, they are old world craftsmen at assembling these things and are required to undergo 200 hours per year of training to keep up on the latest technologies in things like particle board and twist lock bolts. Make sure you get a guy from the official Ikea Assemblers guild though, there are knockoff companies that send Germans who fake Swedish accents.

We fly him out from Sweden, put him up in a local hotel, and he comes over to assemble our stuff in an afternoon. We also spend the extra to have him bring titanium versions of all the assembly hardware, you don't want to skimp on that stuff.
Whatever works... I guess

You might be surprised how many households don't even own a screwdriver...
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Old 11-25-2011, 09:47 AM
 
Location: SoCal
4,387 posts, read 3,883,658 times
Reputation: 2808
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
I've seen some of the complaints and the problem was in the assembly...
We've had IKEA for years, and it's held up. We do need to go around and re-tighten the fasteners. I agree ... it most likely would not hold up to children.

Not long ago, though, we bought the first item from IKEA (an end-table, which we bought in the UK) that we had a problem with. There was no way that was going to be assembled without breaking at least two laws of physics. One of us is an engineer and another is a scientist, and we have much IKEA assembly experience between us, so that wasn't it. It was simply mis-manufactured.
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Old 11-25-2011, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
38,744 posts, read 37,468,872 times
Reputation: 28747
Things will last longer if you learn to have a Tao relationship with them. Move things as if there were a brim-ful bowl of soup sitting on it. Set things down or close doors as if there were someone sleeping in the room that you wouldn't want to waken. Handle things like you would a baby bird.

Your car will last much longer if you drive it as though there were a bottle of fine wine standing on the hood. Start, stop and corner accordingly, and one car will last a lifetime.

Go and watch a master craftsman at work sometime. See how he handles his tools and materials.

Last edited by jtur88; 11-25-2011 at 11:21 AM..
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Old 11-26-2011, 02:46 PM
Status: "back to being a 3 dog household" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
2,532 posts, read 2,078,085 times
Reputation: 4991
In 1990 I bought a house which had been built in 1928. It had a gas hot water heater, a Sears unit, which had been installed in 1953 (original sales receipt and owners booklet were left with it) and in 2006 when the unit was 53 years old I sold the house. I know one is supposed to drain them periodically but I never did.

The new owners planned to replace it even though there was nothing wrong with it. They also planned to replace with washer and dryer, also Kenmore units, that came with the house when I bought it and never had any trouble with. I don't know how old they were but they place had been a rental for about 7 years and I'd guess that the home owners left them as part of the rental when they purchased to a new house and so those machines were likely 25 or more years old.

From what I understand one can not buy a hot water heater with more than a 7 year warranty nowadays. Why not? Surely it is still possible to manufacture equipment that lasts?
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Old 11-26-2011, 02:54 PM
 
20,337 posts, read 15,614,201 times
Reputation: 9398
Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post

From what I understand one can not buy a hot water heater with more than a 7 year warranty nowadays. Why not? Surely it is still possible to manufacture equipment that lasts?
I have a 12-year warranty on mine. If you have the old (wasteful) water heaters (the ones with a tank)... you can make them last virtually forever by replacing the rods.
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Old 11-26-2011, 03:23 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,722 posts, read 2,131,120 times
Reputation: 4278
I still have one of the original Cuisinart food processors made back in the 70's - everything is still original on it and it works great! I did have to super glue a tiny crack on the bowl a few years back and I can tell that the bowl probably won't last more than a few more months, but the engine still works perfectly fine.

I am also in the camp that has several items from IKEA that are perfectly fine even after many years of use.

But in general, things are made to be replaced now rather than repaired. It fills up the land fills...but that is what we get for the sake of improvements and convenience.
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