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Old 01-03-2013, 09:57 AM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
10,278 posts, read 9,970,295 times
Reputation: 9063

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainNJ View Post
im not really sure why you would have a goal that has no benefits. its like setting a goal to be 50 pounds overweight and figuring out how to do it. whats the point?
But that's my point! You've hit it squarely. You see no benefit. So there is no point for you, personally, to even worry about it. You'll never really have anything useful to say about it, because it is a foreign concept and you see no personal benefit for you.

But here is the way I would answer you: Are you a ballet dancer? I'd doubt you are. I'm not. And personally, I have absolutely zero interest in ballet dancing. I see no point. When I see the dancers, it does nothing for me at all. Besides make me yawn. Watching a ballet is a complete waste of my time. Or, much more a waste of my time to actually try to ballet myself (I'd get myself killed!). Now, if I went to a Ballet Forum and began offering comments, do you think, #1, my comments would be at all useful and constructive? and, #2, would not be filled with a negative undertone (because, truthfully, I dislike ballet--I see it as an infernal waste of time and effort).

That's the way to view this living without a fridge thing. Think of it as a ballet question (or whatever other leisure activity you see as a waste of time). Doing without a fridge, or electricity or whatever, is just one of those wild notions that some folks have. Some people want to climb Mount Everest. Why? What's the benefit?
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Old 01-03-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
10,278 posts, read 9,970,295 times
Reputation: 9063
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
You would like hints for living without a fridge? Home can everything in one meal size jars. Heat and eat, wash the jar, and put it away for next canning session. Don't have any leftovers. Eat lots of fruit and veg that can be left out on the counter, and either eat all you cook, or throw away the leftovers.
This is a good suggestion and essentially what I do, except I don't really eat all that much in the way of the common fruits we see these days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Use a live butcher, so you can purchase only one pork chop or 1/4 pound of ground beef for one meal. Walk straight home and cook it immediately and eat it all. Use dried grains and beans and only cook 1 meals worth at a time (big waste of fuel, there)
I don't eat all that much in the way of meat, so I can get by with cured, dried, or canned meats.

The beans, grains, and rice thing is a great suggestion and is what I eat most of. I cook a quarter cup of rice per meal (and I do it in my solar cooker when possible, or in my rocket stove--which burns small deadfall).


Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
You can dry fruit, meat, and veggies, but be careful. I keep my home made jerky in the freezer. Home dried can mildew if you don't do a perfect job of drying and storing. Unless the fruit and veg are home grown or bought on a super sale, it is not cheap to make dehydrated foods.
This is another good suggestion. I don't do a lot of drying myself, but in the summers, I do pick wild berries from our local canyons and dry them. Also, acorns are good if you know how to process them (if you don't, DON'T eat them!).
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Old 01-03-2013, 11:51 AM
 
Location: NJ
22,670 posts, read 28,551,950 times
Reputation: 14611
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
But that's my point! You've hit it squarely. You see no benefit. So there is no point for you, personally, to even worry about it. You'll never really have anything useful to say about it, because it is a foreign concept and you see no personal benefit for you.

But here is the way I would answer you: Are you a ballet dancer? I'd doubt you are. I'm not. And personally, I have absolutely zero interest in ballet dancing. I see no point. When I see the dancers, it does nothing for me at all. Besides make me yawn. Watching a ballet is a complete waste of my time. Or, much more a waste of my time to actually try to ballet myself (I'd get myself killed!). Now, if I went to a Ballet Forum and began offering comments, do you think, #1, my comments would be at all useful and constructive? and, #2, would not be filled with a negative undertone (because, truthfully, I dislike ballet--I see it as an infernal waste of time and effort).

That's the way to view this living without a fridge thing. Think of it as a ballet question (or whatever other leisure activity you see as a waste of time). Doing without a fridge, or electricity or whatever, is just one of those wild notions that some folks have. Some people want to climb Mount Everest. Why? What's the benefit?
but somebody can articulate the benefits of ballet dancing and i would understand it perfectly. to someone who is interested in a smaller or no fridge, what is their perceived benefit?

just because im not interested in doing something myself, doesnt mean i dont understand others being interested and their reasons. i can also discuss things that i personally am not interested in doing.
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Old 01-03-2013, 02:19 PM
Status: "I cannot wait for the heat to break..." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,368 posts, read 25,483,948 times
Reputation: 87958
OK...I am now using a 4 cubic foot fridge. I went grocery shopping for two today and I have enough meat for more than two weeks. I will have to replenish milk, eggs and veggies but I am good to go.

I bought:

a package of bacon
a dozen eggs
1/2 gallon milk
pack of Italian sausage for 2 meals
hot dogs for 2 meals for both of us
chopped meat for 4 meals
brisket for 3 meals
boneless chicken breast for 4 meals

plus...cukes, carrots, blue cheese, feta cheese, american cheese, ham slices, swiss cheese, crab meat, tuna, pineapple, apples, soda, oj and condiments.

It can be done.

Of course I have more food in my cabinets like pasta, beans, rice, soup, canned veggies, gravy mix, mashed potato mix, and on the counter bananas, tomatoes and a couple of potatoes.
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Old 01-03-2013, 04:37 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
10,278 posts, read 9,970,295 times
Reputation: 9063
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainNJ View Post
but somebody can articulate the benefits of ballet dancing and i would understand it perfectly. to someone who is interested in a smaller or no fridge, what is their perceived benefit?
Well, for me, the perceived benefit is that I would not need cold storage. Just like if I lived without electricity, I wouldn't need it. Whether it's a benefit or not is totally dependent upon the person in question and the circumstances.

My dry goods can literally sit for years and still be good to eat. Fro instance, I eat a lot of oatmeal (it can sit in its bucket for 30 years and still be edible). I open a 23 lbs bucket of it and that lasts me nine months or more. The bucket just sits there in the kitchen and uses no power at all. If I were used to having eggs, bacon, and such things for breakfast, it would require cold storage or me going to a market every day or two. Personally, I just choose to not eat such things very often and I simply don't have to bother with the need for cold storage. It's one less thing I depend on. That's just one example, but much of what I eat falls into the same category. And there is no point of having something that I really don't need or use that much. But like I said, it's not for everyone.

For someone like me, minimalism is a challenge that I like to see if I can meet. For instance, how hard would it be for me to live without electricity and have a relatively normal life? How hard is it to go without cold storage? Without a car? Without heating gas? Etc... I know the answer to these questions, because I've tried it. And if something ever happened for real that necessitated any of these things, I'd have a leg up on it. I've never been one who subscribed to learning to swim as the boat sinks. Just me. That's the way I am.
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Old 01-03-2013, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
15,148 posts, read 15,198,298 times
Reputation: 10872
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
good post!!

I have two large refrigerators, and two freezers, they both pay for themselves, I stock up on the sales..

I hunt for wild game , and freezers are a must, I also cut up animals for other people, and many pay me with meat.. so I need the storage



I'm jealous, I NEED a fridge with a huge largeosity-factor.
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,388 posts, read 42,701,155 times
Reputation: 11465
Quote:
Originally Posted by TotallyTam View Post
Cool! That makes sense for you.

But I am more interested in hearing from people who do not have a fridge or use a small one---and how they manage.
Some years ago I lived in Johnstown, CO (before all the McMansion development around it) and remodeled a small kitchen in the house I owned there to include a small, under-counter fridge (SubZero). The house came to me with a big old Maytag freezer in the basement. My daily commute to work took me right by the grocery store in town, so it was no big deal to pick up fresh foods on the way home from work, which I could cook right away. The fridge was for stuff like milk that a container lasts several days. Anything that needed to be stored for a while went in the chest freezer downstairs. So maybe I "cheated" by having a big chest freezer - but it was an old-school, Newton Iowa built Maytag, probably older than me, and not being upright or frost free, it probably didn't use much "juice".

Basically my "schtick", if I had one, was to not buy Costco sized containers of food that needed refrigeration.

Back in grad school, I had a similar setup in an apartment in Atlanta, little old under-counter fridge. Being single, it worked fine.

Full disclosure - I never did a detailed economic analysis as to if I saved more money on electricity or spent more money buying smaller sizes, not stocking up when refrigerated foods went on sale, etc. The reason the small fridges "worked" for me in those 2 abodes, was that the fridge itself didn't take up excessive space in the small kitchens.

A work around I see all the time in Ukraine is to use the interspace between a storm window and a regular window (typically they are about a foot apart over there) as a sort of fridge. If you have foods like butter, hard cheese, sausages, and such that are not prone to spoil if they are not kept strictly cool enough, they can be put in the window sill, if you set up like that. In any really cold climate, any sort of box that will keep varmints out of the food can be put outside, or on an unheated porch, etc. for a "free" freezer.

Last edited by M3 Mitch; 01-03-2013 at 06:00 PM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:55 PM
 
518 posts, read 667,143 times
Reputation: 962
I think we could make due with a much smaller fridge but I need my upright freezer for make ahead meals. We cook from scratch
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:56 PM
 
518 posts, read 667,143 times
Reputation: 962
make do. nothing is due except change!
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Old 01-03-2013, 07:07 PM
 
14,695 posts, read 18,753,541 times
Reputation: 20214
Seven years ago my then-30 year old fridge broke. Since I knew I was going to remodel my kitchen in the immediate future, I didnt buy another full-sized fridge. I bought a mini-fridge...the kind that's designed to hold a six pack of canned drinks.

I lived with that mini-fridge for a year. Once I grew accustomed to its size, I didnt mind it at all. I had no place to keep frozen foods so I did without -- and probably ate healthier, as a result. I bought more veggies and fruits and less dairy products.

When the remodeling was complete I bought a full-sized fridge again. But I dont fill it as I once would have. In fact, I could have continued to use the mini-fridge all these years.
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