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Old 01-03-2013, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,706 posts, read 21,760,954 times
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Bummer, I just lost my long post but it was mostly about keeping eggs.

Safely Preserving Eggs |

Also, you can hang food in a bucket in a in a deep well if you're lucky enough to have one.
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:07 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,245 posts, read 5,748,743 times
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I didn't read all the replies so don't know if there was something posted to what follows....anway, I have a memory of living with this.

Back when i was a kid i spent a summer with my grandparents in Germany.

They were pretty poor. No TV, no hot water, and the stove they used to cook and heat water with was a coal stove. (they used these anthracite briquettes as fuel).

But they did have a refrigerator. It was, quite literally, an ice box. Just as big as a box, but it did run on electricity.

From what i recall it was used mostly for dairy products, and maybe some meat. They had a cold cellar for storing produce and stuff...but I seem to remember not much kept on hand that was perishable.

Everything else was purchased at the little "corner store" down the street (later at "Der Albrecht" aka ALDI) or at the market on the high street, or at butchers and bakers and such. Shopping trips were frequent and what was purchased was what could fit in this red oilcloth tasche (or bag) (in Germany the old US tradition of the brown paper shopping bag did not exist...you brought your own).

So sure it's doable. But here in the USA probably NOT doable unless you live in a city or town that has the food retail density the permits frequent shopping trips. Most places here in the US are not set up that way, becuase you get the economies of scale from large size supermarkets with large trading areas, which means you have to drive and then make bulk purchases so as to make the drive worthwhile. Thus a larger fridge is necessary to store bulk purchases.
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Old 01-04-2013, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Bangor Maine
3,442 posts, read 5,431,463 times
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I think many of us have gotten used to the idea that many things need to be refrigerated. When growing up in my parent's home we never refrigerated things like ketchup, jam, mayonaise, and lots of things that are now labeled "refrigerate" after opening. I think we had a 9 qf refrigerator at the time with a tiny spot for 2 ice cube trays. It was a great day when my parents bought a larger and more modern one and we could keep "ice cream". IMO no one really needs a 22 qf one but they make their lovely kitchens look nice. lol
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Old 01-04-2013, 06:32 PM
 
6,400 posts, read 6,501,386 times
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We are staying with my elderly in laws, and taking care of the house. They have a regular size refrigerator, but they fill it with dibs and dabs and leftovers and cheap sale meat that I wouldn't feed to a dog. So, we needed our own fridge. What we got was a 4.4 cf from Lowe's. It has one outside door, and a full-width freezer compartment with its own latching door. So far, so good. I keep some produce in it, eggs, meats, a little cheese and sour cream, and a couple of condiments. Occasionally milk, but we don't use much milk.
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Old 01-05-2013, 03:24 AM
 
64,577 posts, read 66,129,695 times
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im assuming it is a freeer/refrigerator. letting the refrigeraor part get warm like that is unhealthy and absurd.
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Old 01-05-2013, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Vermont
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In my opinion, the cost of a fridge is not big enough to warrant not owning one for it's convenience. A small full size fridge runs about 400 KW/H per year - about 60 bucks.
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Old 01-05-2013, 08:30 PM
 
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i live without a refrigerator because its my choice ,, refrigerators use a big chunk of your electricity bill , so doing without one is more cash in my pocket,, im a very healthy 70yr old , i have a pantry of canned foods and dry foods , i also take natural vitamins and herbs,,
ive also unplugged my hot water tank , as i take sponge baths , all a shower is ,, is a sponge bath using unnesseary amounts of water that usualy just goes down the drain at your expence,, i grew up this way , so its nothing new to me, as far as food consumption goes , just buy what you will consume for the day, its healthier and its fresh, if the hydro were to go off for a week a lot of you would,nt be able to manage life but in my case it would,nt matter as i can survive
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Old 01-05-2013, 08:37 PM
 
2,110 posts, read 4,048,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TotallyTam View Post
I've had this on my mind for a few years now (since living in rural Mexico). Many people (the economic underclass---which is the majority there) don't have refrigerators because 1) they buy, cook and eat fresh food each day, 2) most cannot afford the extra cost for the electricity, and 3) they simply are not accustomed to using one. Now....I realize we are all accustomed to using a refrigerator and probably cannot imagine life without one. And, I totally get the food-borne illness defense. But I have to think that most people here in the US could use much smaller refrigerators. I have also noticed in my travels that many homes in the UK have much smaller fridges than we do. I have often wondered why so many Americans have gigantic refrigerators, and yet it seems fewer people actually cook at home anymore.

Does anyone here on this forum use a mini-fridge, or none at all? If so, share your tips! Thanks.

Here's a little food for thought to get the ideas flowing...

Living without a Fridge and Beyond
I moved from an apartment to a room rental and had to downsize to a "large" mini refrigerator. It's rough, but I manage. Fortunately, I was able to keep my upright freezer. The homeowner let me put it in the garage.
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Old 01-05-2013, 11:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrcousert View Post
I moved from an apartment to a room rental and had to downsize to a "large" mini refrigerator. It's rough, but I manage. Fortunately, I was able to keep my upright freezer. The homeowner let me put it in the garage.
Lucky. I do miss my deep freeze, but there's really no place for it here.
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Old 01-06-2013, 09:08 AM
 
9,821 posts, read 13,892,257 times
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That's why Americans get gigantically fat also... Gigantic fridges.
Come to think, I grew in country where fridges were either unavailable or very expensive to buy. Lived without one till age of 17-18.
We did buy daily worth of food; butter was kept in water; summer time, say perishables, like soups or such, were kept in bathtub in water also. And cooked for day - 2 day use. Winter time was no problem - all was hung outside the window. Oh, yes, our windows opened.
I am not aware of any epidemics caused by that.
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