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Old 01-25-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
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I'm sure there's different opinions on this, but from my experience its easier to do this in an suburban setting. Why? Because the people you buy from in a rural setting have less competition and have lower volume, so it costs more to buy things like gasoline. Gas is always more expensive the further I get out into the country. Same with food. If you want to save money by traveling to the city, then you have the extra travel, and mileage is expensive. Car or truck is the typical persons bigger expenses. More miles you put on, the biggest your costs on the vehicle. So all in all, it seems it would be cheaper to live in a suburban setting.
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Old 01-25-2013, 10:58 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
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Less to spend money on (sports, restaurants, shows, etc.) in a rural setting... so it gets my vote.
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Old 01-25-2013, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
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Too many variables. But in general I would say you are correct based on my observations moving to a semi-suburban area (8 miles of farmland between home and the Des Moines Metro area) to a rural small town (community of 40 in a county of 10,000).

Gas is higher, and you have to travel farther for most things; consumer items are more expensive; school districts are smaller which means they are fewer and farther between which adds to transportation costs which means higher taxes per capita to support schools, and so forth and so on.

But as Pitt Chick says, if you live in a suburban area and fall into the habit of taking advantage of all the athletic and cultural events the area has to offer on a regular basis you will wind up spending all that money you saved by living there and then some.
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Old 01-25-2013, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
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duster: I'm sure you're right about stuff to do, but what's wrong with having more money to spend on a little fun. I'd love to be able to take in an art festival or a major league baseball game without it being a major excursion from the hinterlands. Besides, when we lived in the city, we found a lot of stuff like that to do was free or we found cheap ways to do it. Like we used to be able to go to a Rangers game for $7.00 a ticket on special event nights.
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Old 01-25-2013, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairieparson View Post
duster: I'm sure you're right about stuff to do, but what's wrong with having more money to spend on a little fun.
There's nothing "wrong" with it; it just doesn't really fall under the "frugal living" umbrella.
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:00 PM
 
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It depends on the specific person, of course, but people in many suburban areas still put a LOT of mileage on their cars, and often pay more for housing than they would in more rural areas (although may also have higher salaries than what they'd get in a rural area). According to one relatively recent study, people living in cities drove an average of 26 miles each day, people living in the suburbs drove an average of 29 miles each day, and people in rural areas averaged 37 miles.

With online shopping I'd also assume that some of the cost differences in consumer goods are less significant than they'd have been in the not-so-distant past. Places like Amazon will ship practically anything, and they don't care where you live.

I think there are just so many variables to consider. When looking at the big picture, I would assume it come down to housing and income. When we lived in a smaller town the housing was much cheaper, but most of the salaries were lower, too.
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:12 PM
 
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This is ridiculous. GROW YOUR OWN FOOD AND COOK. Try that in suburbs. Gas prices... You burban boys spend how much on eating out and "civilization"?
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:56 PM
 
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Suburban for us. We can drive anywhere we want within 10 miles tops. That works for us.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairieparson View Post
I'm sure there's different opinions on this, but from my experience its easier to do this in an suburban setting. Why? Because the people you buy from in a rural setting have less competition and have lower volume, so it costs more to buy things like gasoline. Gas is always more expensive the further I get out into the country. Same with food. If you want to save money by traveling to the city, then you have the extra travel, and mileage is expensive. Car or truck is the typical persons bigger expenses. More miles you put on, the biggest your costs on the vehicle. So all in all, it seems it would be cheaper to live in a suburban setting.
I'd vote for the rural areas. Transportation costs may be higher, but housing is generally much cheaper. Rural areas also tend to have less to spend your money on, which means there's less consumerism and less temptation to give into it. The sticking point for rural areas is the low salary. If that hurdle can be overcome, the rural area wins hands down in most casts.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by packer43064 View Post
Suburban for us. We can drive anywhere we want within 10 miles tops. That works for us.
That's the problem. It's so easy to 'stop and pick something up'
Or: 'run out and get x'

I lived across the street from a super wallmart for my internship and I was ALWAYS stoping by for a fresh this or that... Or i had planned one thing, but felt like another that was missing one ingredient etc...

Live farther out and you PLAN what your going to buy better, and lower housi g MORE than makes up for the miles traveled.

Less eating out too. (not to mention fresh eggs from the neighbor etc)
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