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Old 12-03-2014, 02:22 PM
 
9,064 posts, read 9,217,240 times
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I have a funny antique door lock (see photo). If you use the key to throw the deadbolt it works 90% of the time. The other times the deadbolt gets loose, and it sticks in the door, or if you turn it too far clockwise it won't open. Those fraction of a time can be a real problem with my aging parents.

The two "finger buttons" on the bottom used to throw a setting, so that the door locked without the deadbolt. But they no longer work. I don't know what to call them or how to fix them because I can't find a lock like this on the internet.

Can I replace it with a more modern lock? The faceplate is 7" by 2.25", and the deadbolt an knobs are separate. The lock is about 85 years old, and I am reluctant to remove it if it is difficult to replace.

It is buried in the wooden door which I believe makes it a mortise lock.
Attached Thumbnails
Antique door lock-entry-door-lock.jpg  
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Old 12-03-2014, 03:44 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
4,747 posts, read 7,491,873 times
Reputation: 6347
Replacements are available. Here is one source:

Door Latch | Mortise Lock | Skeleton Key Lock | House of Antique Hardware

If you want to try repairing it, some info here

Cleaning and Repairing an Antique Mortise Door Lock
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Old 12-03-2014, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
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I had these locks once. Besides being problematic when they age, they're not particularly secure. I solved the issue by adding a modern deadbolt to the door above the existing doorknob.
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Old 12-03-2014, 06:02 PM
 
9,064 posts, read 9,217,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
If you want to try repairing it, some info here
I found those websites, but they make no reference to those two little buttons you push in with your thumbs. I am reluctant to take it apart since I am not sure what will happen.
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Old 12-04-2014, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,432 posts, read 24,204,419 times
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I would add a modern deadbolt and disable the existing lock. That would probably be the least expensive option. If I didn't want to do that I would have a locksmith come out and clean/fix the whole thing. I know that sounds expensive but many times you can get them to play let's make a deal especially if you let them come when their business is slow.
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Old 12-10-2014, 03:43 PM
 
Location: NNJ
8,441 posts, read 4,653,285 times
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I have these all over my house and they have been repaired and re-repaired several times.

For the front door, the first thing I did was have the entire door plus frame replaced (it too had an antique Mortise lock). I did it for security reasons and for insulation purposes as the original had single pane windows and no longer sealed along the door frame.

Well worth the money spent.
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Old 12-17-2014, 09:26 AM
 
9,064 posts, read 9,217,240 times
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I had two locks (both circa 1929). One where the keyed deadbolt worked, but not the pushbuttons, and the second was the other way around. I took them both apart hoping to make one the worked perfectly but the mechanisms were slightly different. Finally, I gave up.

I lock the one with the antique deadbolt, and a new deadbolt was installed on the other door completely independent. Too many moving parts and little springs and cogs.
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Old 12-19-2014, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Bend Or.
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And this is related to frugal living how?
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Old 12-22-2014, 09:52 PM
 
25,801 posts, read 49,697,815 times
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I've owned several 1920's homes with the same lock...

Being frugal, I took them apart to clean and oil and then reinstalled...

Also added a modern deadbolt for added security.

The button locks and unlocks the outside door knob... in the locked position the door can only be opened with the key.
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Old 02-03-2016, 01:51 AM
 
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Where did you find that door? Was in it Mississippi by any chance? There was one like that in the house I grew up in, even down to the color.
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