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Old 11-24-2015, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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The electric companies in CA keep offering to send out free kits to save on electricity, including free CFL bulbs. I'm intrigued about trying out LED bulbs, but I'll keep using these free ones until they start sending me free LED ones, LOL.

Prior to getting free bulbs, I waited for my incandescent bulbs to burn out before I switched to CFLs, and those lasted me years before burning out. I didn't like the first version of CFLs because they were too big. Once they figured out how to make them the size of the old bulbs, so they'd fit in my lamps and fixtures, I started switching in earnest.
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Old 11-24-2015, 04:46 PM
 
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I was an early adopter to both CFL and LEDs. I started replacing the most used bulbs first. Hallway (2 bulbs), living room (7), kitchen (4), garage (4), outdoor deck (2). Areas like the closet, fireplace, and extra fixtures still have incandescent bulbs and are seldom used. By slowly changing my bulbs, I'm able to dollar cost average as the price and technology improves. I recall my first CFLs looking terrible and costing close to $10 each on sale. My first LED bulbs are junk compared to what's available now. I like to use 2700-3000K (warm yellow) in the bedroom and outdoors, and 3500K-4000K in the living room, kitchen, & garage.
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Old 11-24-2015, 05:18 PM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
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we replaced all of our bulbs in a new house with CFL or LED. Just recently, some neighbors compared their electric bills and they had easily twice the electric bill that I have year round so I would say it's more frugal to replace the bulbs up front and not waste the electricity waiting for the bulbs to burn out.

I didn't calculate payback period but probably around 6 months or less. I can't remember what I paid for all those bulbs but it was probably north of 300. We did supplement with free bulbs that my wife got from her work (former GE employee).
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Old 11-25-2015, 02:58 AM
bUU
 
Location: Georgia
11,699 posts, read 8,163,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
I'm still waiting for a LED bulb that's both:

1) higher than 800 lumens
2) less than $15
I recently bought 10 G7 Power Tahoe LED 15 Watt 1100 Lumen BR30 Dimmable 4000K Bright Whites for $149.50 delivered. So good deals are out there.
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Old 11-25-2015, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,880 posts, read 15,634,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
I'm still waiting for a LED bulb that's both:

1) higher than 800 lumens
2) less than $15
This were the things holding me back from trying them, as well. But after taking the plunge when I saw them on a special buy at 2 for $4 I question how lumens are measured. Reason being, the 450 lumen rated Sylvania LED bulbs I purchased are much brighter than the 820 lumen rated CFL bulbs that they replaced. Both were sold as a 60-watt incandescent equivalent.
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Old 11-25-2015, 09:14 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
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I dislike the CFL bulbs and never switched to them. I do like the LEDs and I've put those into any of the light fixtures that are difficult to change, hoping that they really do last longer than incandescent.

I found that incandescents are cheaper to run than CFLs, because it takes far too long for the CFL to warm up to the point that it gives enough light to see. Therefore the CFL had to be left on all the time, and the incandescent would be turned on and right back off again. No matter how much they claimed that CLFs gave equivalent light to incandescent, they don't give enough light to read by.

I like the LEDs. They give light immediately and the light is bright enough to be useful. They are expensive, which I suppose is OK of they really do last along time.

On this length of life issue, though, most of my incandescent bulbs were long lived. I bought a six year old house, so don't know how long those bulbs had been in place, but most of those ame bulbs were still working when I moved out 10years later. The only ones I replaced were some spots in the kitchen and I didn't have to replace those for years after I bought the house.

My son's house is now 9 years old and none of the incandescent bulbs have burned out. He's replaced most of the light fixtures with large florescent lights, which do work very well. But the remaining fixtures with incandescent bulbs haven't had the bulbs changed and he installed a ceiling fan that has incandescent bulbs. That light is used long hours every day and not one of those bulbs has burned out.

The hall lights are still the original incandescent bulbs and those are off and on frequently.

It's all well and fine for long life to be pointed put as an advantage for the expensive bulbs, but I suspect that they don't really last any longer.
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Old 11-25-2015, 09:19 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
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Veering slightly off topic, it costs the same amount of electricity to produce the same amount of heat, so, because I live in a cold climate, the money to run incandescent bulbs is not lost. The heat produced goes into heating the house and is a transfer of electric use from furnace to light bulbs.
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Old 11-25-2015, 09:22 AM
bUU
 
Location: Georgia
11,699 posts, read 8,163,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
It's all well and fine for long life to be pointed put as an advantage for the expensive bulbs, but I suspect that they don't really last any longer.
I found there to be a distinct difference between CFLs and LEDs: Some CFLs started failing after just a few months (rather than after their promised six to eight year lifespan). We've been using LEDs for more than two years now and I don't think any of them have failed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Veering slightly off topic, it costs the same amount of electricity to produce the same amount of heat, so, because I live in a cold climate, the money to run incandescent bulbs is not lost. The heat produced goes into heating the house and is a transfer of electric use from furnace to light bulbs.
I don't believe incandescent bulbs are an energy efficient means of generating heat.
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Old 11-25-2015, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,489 posts, read 1,273,004 times
Reputation: 1890
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Veering slightly off topic, it costs the same amount of electricity to produce the same amount of heat, so, because I live in a cold climate, the money to run incandescent bulbs is not lost. The heat produced goes into heating the house and is a transfer of electric use from furnace to light bulbs.

Living in Minnesota where we need structural heating for 7-9 months a year, I thought of that same fact. However I found that is you even mention this rather nuanced point.....people look at you strangely and don't really know where to go with the conversation, so I basically just kept it to myself...lol.

There is no one rule to set of best practices that work in all circumstances or places. I'm not about to be switching bulb types between heating and cooling seasons, but my main point was just to say that the added effencies of the LED/CFL vs incandescent bulbs differs between climates and seasons. When I finally did switch from incandescents to CFL/LED bulbs, it makes more sense to do it in the spring in Minnesota than in the fall right before the heating season.

As to the person who mentioned that the heat from incandescent bulbs isn't very effecient, I do believe electricity is about the only form of energy that is 100% effecient after being delivered to your home.....am I not correct ? My natural gas furnace advertises 92% effecient and I believe the typical fuel oil furnace is even less effecient than that.
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Old 11-25-2015, 11:08 AM
bUU
 
Location: Georgia
11,699 posts, read 8,163,805 times
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Quote:
1. They are not efficient heaters. Incandescent bulbs are essentially electric resistance heaters. And because of the inefficiencies of producing electricity and transmission losses, even dedicated electric resistance heaters are far less efficient than using natural gas, propane or an air-source heat pump.
Incandescent Bulbs Still Suck: Why the Bulb as Heater Argument Falls Short : TreeHugger
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