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Old 01-06-2016, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Mass
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If you live in Mass mass save does free home energy assessments:

Energy Specialists in Massachusetts | Mass Save Home Energy Auditors
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Old 01-08-2016, 09:31 AM
 
9,064 posts, read 9,217,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LowonLuck View Post
I changed all the inside recessed flood lights to LED light bulbs this weekend. Here is hoping it makes a difference.
It won't.

Buy some battery powered electric socks for you and your children and try to turn down the thermostat until it is uncomfortable. Buy some small electric heaters and set them on low (600 Watts) .
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Old 01-08-2016, 10:15 AM
 
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A quick rule of thumb to estimating costs is that a 60 Watt bulb running 24/7 will cost you $60/year. Now light bulb manufacturers use the rule that an average light bulb is on 1 hour out of 8, so the year cost of running a 60 watt bulb is $60/8=$7.67 per year. You should adjust that for some bulbs in your house. Some of them are on for 1 hour out of 3, others are on for only a few minutes per day on average.

So if you replace a 60 Watt bulb with a 10 Watt LED bulb your costs are reduced from $60/year to $10/year if you run it 24/7. Now obviously if it is an emergency bulb that is on 12 hours a day, you will reduce your costs from $30/year to $5/year, so the investment in an LED bulb will pay back within a year even if you pay top dollar for the bulb.

Around here, the LED bulbs equivalent to 60 Watts are subsidized by the power company so that they cost $3 or $4 at the Home Depot. The 75W and 100W replacement bulbs are still upwards to $17-$22 per bulb. The subsidized bulbs pay back their investment very quickly.

Now if you are replacing 100W or 200W floodlights, and you are able to buy subsidized bulbs, you will obviously save money, but your particular problem is in the hundreds of dollars per month. The cost of the lighbulbs is just noise.
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Old 01-08-2016, 10:23 AM
 
5,605 posts, read 4,158,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
A quick rule of thumb to estimating costs is that a 60 Watt bulb running 24/7 will cost you $60/year. Now light bulb manufacturers use the rule that an average light bulb is on 1 hour out of 8, so the year cost of running a 60 watt bulb is $60/8=$7.67 per year. You should adjust that for some bulbs in your house. Some of them are on for 1 hour out of 3, others are on for only a few minutes per day on average.

So if you replace a 60 Watt bulb with a 10 Watt LED bulb your costs are down to $10 a year if you run it 24/7. Now obviously if it is an emergency bulb that is on 12 hours a day, you will reduce your costs from $30/year to $5 a year, so the investment in an LED bulb will pay back within a year.

Around here, the LED bulbs equivalent to 60 Watts are subsidized by the power company so that they cost $3 or $4 at the Home Depot. The 75W and 100W replacement bulbs are still upwards to $17-$22 per bulb.

Now if you are replacing 100W or 200W floodlights, and you are able to buy subsidized bulbs, you will obviously save money, but your particular problem is in the hundreds of dollars per month. The cost of the lighbulbs is just noise.

Same here. But, even so I'm still replacing with 100W in lamps that take 150W incandescents. 60W are cheaper and save energy, but do not give out enough light for reading or even general illumination in a large room.
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Old 01-09-2016, 04:11 PM
 
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I've replaced all of my primary lighting that's on when I'm awake with LED. I have lots of bulbs that are rarely ever used that are still halogen or old school tungsten.
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Old 01-10-2016, 07:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by UNC4Me View Post
Same here. But, even so I'm still replacing with 100W in lamps that take 150W incandescents. 60W are cheaper and save energy, but do not give out enough light for reading or even general illumination in a large room.
I suppose it depends on how many hours per day you use the bulb. A 60W incandescent replaced with a 10W LED that you use for 12 hours a day where the subsidized cost of $4 pays back in 58 days.

An unsubsidized $18 100W replacement for an LED pays back in over 900 days. It is difficult to get too excited about that kind of payback period.

Now if you are using it 12 hours/day then the payback is only 152 days.

Rate $0.115 kW/hr
W Wr Hr/D Cost Payback Days
-60 10 12 $4 58 LED
100 14 12 $18 152 LED
100 14 -2 $18 910 LED
100 73 -2 $1.5 242 Halogen

Last edited by PacoMartin; 01-10-2016 at 07:30 AM..
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Old 01-10-2016, 07:44 AM
 
14,253 posts, read 14,736,031 times
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I am replacing Halogen and incandescent bulbs with LED in my high traffic areas. One thing I have noticed is that a 65W equivalent LED seems to be as bright as a 75W equivalent Halogen flood even though the lumen rating is lower possibly because the light (soft white) is a bit whiter than my Halogen. And a 65W equivalent at Home Depot is about $4 cheaper than the 75W equivalent and not much more expensive than the Halogen flood so I have installed them in two areas and they work fine. My plan is to gradually switch the low traffic areas over as well.

What I had not realized - because one tends to take lighting for granted - is just how many lights I have in the house so replacement is an expensive business. And even if the payback period is fairly extended - say 900 days as suggested above - that is okay provide the LED lights last as long as the manufacturer claims which is 22 years.

Not having to replace light bulbs in the foreseeable future is an attraction. And there is a cost to replacing bulbs as it involves a trip to Home Depot (20 miles) or to Ace (5 miles) so that needs to be factored into the payback period.
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Old 01-10-2016, 08:29 AM
 
6,908 posts, read 3,738,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobrainman View Post
If you live in Mass mass save does free home energy assessments:

Energy Specialists in Massachusetts | Mass Save Home Energy Auditors
I don't. But my state does. However I had to complete some repairs to my house, which were finished this weekend, so I can now schedule them to come back out.
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Old 01-10-2016, 08:34 AM
 
6,908 posts, read 3,738,461 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
It won't.

Buy some battery powered electric socks for you and your children and try to turn down the thermostat until it is uncomfortable. Buy some small electric heaters and set them on low (600 Watts) .
Yeah the led light bulbs made no significant change.

The house is already uncomfortably cold. Thermostat is set at 65 and it is a drafty/ cold 65. As a friend explained this weekend, my rooms are so large and open, by the time heat gets to them the heat is cold.

We have been running the gas stove a lot, but we went through 100 gallons in 12 days. This month I project our total heating cost will be in the neighborhood of $600. Which would be fine if the house was actually warm, but it is very cold. I am ready for spring to turn off the heat and be looking at $200 electric bills again.

My moms friend lives in the same neighborhood and she said her house is the same. Very cold and expensive. She has oil heat though.
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Old 01-10-2016, 08:38 AM
 
6,908 posts, read 3,738,461 times
Reputation: 4612
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
A quick rule of thumb to estimating costs is that a 60 Watt bulb running 24/7 will cost you $60/year. Now light bulb manufacturers use the rule that an average light bulb is on 1 hour out of 8, so the year cost of running a 60 watt bulb is $60/8=$7.67 per year. You should adjust that for some bulbs in your house. Some of them are on for 1 hour out of 3, others are on for only a few minutes per day on average.

So if you replace a 60 Watt bulb with a 10 Watt LED bulb your costs are reduced from $60/year to $10/year if you run it 24/7. Now obviously if it is an emergency bulb that is on 12 hours a day, you will reduce your costs from $30/year to $5/year, so the investment in an LED bulb will pay back within a year even if you pay top dollar for the bulb.

Around here, the LED bulbs equivalent to 60 Watts are subsidized by the power company so that they cost $3 or $4 at the Home Depot. The 75W and 100W replacement bulbs are still upwards to $17-$22 per bulb. The subsidized bulbs pay back their investment very quickly.

Now if you are replacing 100W or 200W floodlights, and you are able to buy subsidized bulbs, you will obviously save money, but your particular problem is in the hundreds of dollars per month. The cost of the lighbulbs is just noise.
I had over 30 floodlight bulbs throughout the house.
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