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Old 12-25-2015, 08:59 AM
 
67,543 posts, read 68,351,515 times
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one good thing about these tiny nyc studio apartments .

you can cook , entertain guests and sit on the toilet all at the same time .
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Old 12-25-2015, 11:09 AM
 
6,659 posts, read 8,240,111 times
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The part of minimalism I'd like is the kind the interior living spaces are functional, beautiful, minimal, and clutter-free. Cleaning would be so much easier, and creativity tends to flow when there isn't extra stuff around, blocking energy. My real wish (besides the obvious ones of winning the lottery and teleportation), is a completely self-cleaning house.
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Old 12-25-2015, 12:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maniac77 View Post
I'm a minimalist out of necessity. I can't afford to buy stuff outside of my basic needs. It's only cool being a minimalist if it's a choice rather than just because you're poor.

I live in a 450 square foot studio apartment and I love living in such a small space. I live close to work and grocery stores, so I don't own a car and walk most places. That's good because I'd never be able to afford one. My transportation costs are under $10 for the entire year (5 bus rides). I do have a cell phone, but it's free. I recently splurged and got a Roku, but I won't be paying to watch anything. I do have internet that I use for work and entertainment, but other than that, food, toiletries, rent, utilities, and various insurances, I don't buy anything else. I've been wearing the same clothes since the 90s, I've never bought furniture, and I've had the same twin bed since the 5th grade. I'm 38 now. I do spend too much on food, but none of it is ever wasted.
I lifestyle that I would go to any measure to avoid. Sounds miserable. I'm glad we all have choices.
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Old 12-25-2015, 12:36 PM
 
1,966 posts, read 1,378,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Agreed.

A poster upthread mentioned living in a 450 square foot studio apartment. In many parts of the world, living alone in your own apartment is a luxury most people cannot afford. In places like New York & San Francisco they have micro apartments smaller than that which cost well over $1000 or even $2000 per month. In Hong Kong & Tokyo, families of 3 or 4 people share studio sized apartments, and this is considered normal for those places.
Good luck finding an apt. in San Francisco for $1-2000 a month...even a small one. If you do, let me know and I'll grab i!
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Old 12-25-2015, 02:01 PM
 
1,153 posts, read 1,012,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burkmere View Post
I lifestyle that I would go to any measure to avoid. Sounds miserable. I'm glad we all have choices.
It is miserable. Thanks for noticing. It's quite a life I've carved out for myself. And winter has arrived, so life will be especially fun the next few months.

Last edited by maniac77; 12-25-2015 at 02:14 PM..
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Old 12-25-2015, 02:07 PM
 
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Minimalism is a lifestyle and design choice (emphasis on choice). By contrast, if one is poor or 'financially challenged,' then a more accurate term would be frugal or thrifty. Of course someone can also be thrifty due to necessity and then decide to be a minimalist as a lifestyle choice.

Do a Google search on "minimalist interiors" and look at the images. You'll see a very high level of design in most of them. Nothing cheap going on there whatsoever. Some spaces are small, some are tiny, some are average, and some are large, but what they all seem to have in common is great design with quality materials and workmanship.
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Old 12-25-2015, 06:01 PM
 
Location: NY>FL>VA>NC>IN
2,247 posts, read 844,667 times
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*raising hand* extreme minimalist here.

I have always had an aversion to owning things. I was raised with looottsss of stuff. Fancy stuff.
I made sure my kids had lots of nice things. Never cluttered, always neat on shelves and in bins; they had a playroom. It looked like a really well equipped daycare. They had an abundance of things for sure. Fancy room furnishings in their bedrooms, changed every few years at their whims, the works. They got stuff all year round and at Christmas prob 20-30 gifts each.

But my personal possessions amount to books, CDS and DVDS. I loathe decor.
I have given away everything I owned over the years. Piece by piece as kids grew up and I didn't have to maintain the image of a normal home. My kids got my good jewelry.

Now I own just books, DVDs and CDS. It makes me happy to own almost nothing.
I am now poor but I was like this even when solidly middle class.
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Old 12-27-2015, 12:08 PM
 
112 posts, read 72,814 times
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I am "poor" compared to most americans.
And I find minimalism fun and exciting.
I am not a privleged person, or someone with a huge bank account.
I have worked hard in life and met some hurdles and have learned to
appreciate what I have...
so I have to disagree when ones say that minimalism is only fun or exciting
when you have the choice to be minimalist or not...
the thing is, even when ones live in poverty in america they could still streamline
their life and become more mindful.
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Old 12-27-2015, 06:53 PM
 
25,144 posts, read 27,448,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burkmere View Post
Good luck finding an apt. in San Francisco for $1-2000 a month...even a small one. If you do, let me know and I'll grab i!
Right, that's my point.

I'll be the first one to gripe about rents and home prices here in the Bay Area and the unfairness of it all (because of artificially constrained supply due to NIMBYism), but overall Americans are just plain insane with their obsession for ever more living space.
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Old 12-27-2015, 07:01 PM
 
25,144 posts, read 27,448,595 times
Reputation: 23359
Quote:
Originally Posted by MerciChoi View Post
I am "poor" compared to most americans.
And I find minimalism fun and exciting.
I am not a privleged person, or someone with a huge bank account.
I have worked hard in life and met some hurdles and have learned to
appreciate what I have...
so I have to disagree when ones say that minimalism is only fun or exciting
when you have the choice to be minimalist or not...
the thing is, even when ones live in poverty in america they could still streamline
their life and become more mindful.
I probably don't meet the definition of strict minimalist (depends on one's definition), but I am minimalistic more by choice than by absolute necessity. But I am quasi-minimalist by choice because 1. I think life is easier and less stressful this way. and 2. It enables me to save and invest money, which means I become steadily less dependent on the whims of the employment market with each paycheck. The saving and investing makes life less stressful, creating a positive feedback loop.

I don't find minimalism all that fun or exciting. I like it precisely because it isn't all that exciting--although I do like watching my net worth grow. I DO find having more options in life to be somewhat fun/exciting. I also think minimalism by choice is definitely better than by necessity (I think that's true of most things--choice is usually better than no choice). I like having money. It goes back to taking the stress level down. Forced minimalism = stressful.
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