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Old 02-11-2016, 02:27 AM
 
2,131 posts, read 1,413,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
It makes no financial sense to buy a more expensive car just for a need years down the road. In those years the vehicle will probably lose 60-70% of its value. You would have saved a lot by buying the cheaper vehicle first, then trading to the pricier one when you need it. By then it will be years older and you'll pick it up at a 60-70% "discount".
But I wouldn't want too outdated car few years down the road. I could do that now, get far older version of the expensive car I want. Price would match the cheaper car easily but then it wont be me treating myself. I will most likely get basic car until I get to a point in life when I wont think 2x about splurging

But I was thinking about minimalist, if few things are expensive wouldn't one be more possessive of their belonging
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Old 02-11-2016, 10:10 AM
 
Location: On a Farm & by the sea
1,091 posts, read 2,462,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MerciChoi View Post
I am "poor" compared to most americans.
And I find minimalism fun and exciting.
I am not a privleged person, or someone with a huge bank account.
I have worked hard in life and met some hurdles and have learned to
appreciate what I have...
so I have to disagree when ones say that minimalism is only fun or exciting
when you have the choice to be minimalist or not...
the thing is, even when ones live in poverty in america they could still streamline
their life and become more mindful.
Yes, I think minimalism is a state of mind, regardless of financial circumstances.
Living mindfully...with intention and purpose is at the core of the philosophy for me.
It is exciting to continue to go through the challenge of releasing whatever does not serve a good and useful purpose in life. Yes, I have some pieces of art that others may call clutter or excess...but for us, it serves the purpose of making our home warm and beautiful. Living mindfully of every purchase, every meal planned and prepared, every work assignment, etc... is just a more connected and beautiful way to live, IMHO.
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Old 02-11-2016, 12:07 PM
 
780 posts, read 480,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
But I wouldn't want too outdated car few years down the road. I could do that now, get far older version of the expensive car I want. Price would match the cheaper car easily but then it wont be me treating myself. I will most likely get basic car until I get to a point in life when I wont think 2x about splurging

But I was thinking about minimalist, if few things are expensive wouldn't one be more possessive of their belonging
Minimalistic lifestyle has nothing to do with the price tag of your belongings.
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Old 02-11-2016, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Mequon, WI
7,730 posts, read 19,167,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinabean View Post
Yes, I think minimalism is a state of mind, regardless of financial circumstances.
Living mindfully...with intention and purpose is at the core of the philosophy for me.
It is exciting to continue to go through the challenge of releasing whatever does not serve a good and useful purpose in life.
This is the heart of it, not so much of just getting rid of things but narrow your focus on what is truly important. Work on your relationships, be a great friend, volunteer, parent, pastor, stranger. Minimalism is almost religion or spiritual like, in that live your life with a purpose just don't be here taking up space. Getting rid of possessions is only 50% of it, focus your friendships, what you value. Get out there and experience life. Focus your life.

Everyone will have a moment in life when they are on the last hole of life and you'll think about what you made of your years. Knowing that you made the most of it and had a beautiful life is true minimalism.
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Old 02-13-2016, 09:52 AM
 
8,672 posts, read 4,748,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
M. Now let's say that person (or family) spends "only" $75,000 a year and saves/invests/charitably donates the remaining $40,000.

if you living a minimal lifestyle, why would anybody donate 40k a year. why would anybody donate to begin with. put that in saving and retire early
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Old 02-13-2016, 10:09 AM
 
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I wonder if people do think about their lives in terms of "lifestyles" (the word I passionately hate). It is so silly and mass cult suggestible. "I am into minimum wage lifestyle", "I shoot for 11/hr lifestyle", "I live socker mom lifestyle", "I am into lake living lifestyle", the list is endless, it perplexes me why people use that word. Is it psychotherapeutic, an ersatz term creating an illusion of mastery of ones life? Why not to master the terms and language then, why use brain vomit of some professional "lifestyle expert" to compartmentolize oneself?
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Old 02-13-2016, 10:25 AM
 
4,865 posts, read 4,906,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milwaukee City View Post
This is the heart of it, not so much of just getting rid of things but narrow your focus on what is truly important. Work on your relationships, be a great friend, volunteer, parent, pastor, stranger. Minimalism is almost religion or spiritual like, in that live your life with a purpose just don't be here taking up space. Getting rid of possessions is only 50% of it, focus your friendships, what you value. Get out there and experience life. Focus your life.

Everyone will have a moment in life when they are on the last hole of life and you'll think about what you made of your years. Knowing that you made the most of it and had a beautiful life is true minimalism.
Yup, people will be standing in line to befriend and have relationships with "minimalist" you, not. I am always amazed at people using purpose driven crutch to live another day, apparently mimimalism doesnt shrink ego much, it satiates it using different means. Apparently, for whatever reason, good chunk of self-proclaimed minimalists and spiritualists could not master mainstream ways of ego saturation. Alas, in America at least, few people if any appreciate the profound depth of minimalist self and his/her importance for destiny of Universe. If you embraced minimalism, willingly or not, you'll pay a steep price in quantity and quality of your "relationships" and "friendships", especially later in life. Tell me your tax bracket and I'll tell you who your friends are. It's very simple. A voluntary minimalist is doomed for not so pleasant company of non voluntary minimalists, if he is lucky that is.
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Old 02-17-2016, 12:13 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,662 posts, read 20,739,928 times
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I think what you're seeing among American Millennials is influence by European views of stuff. Things like choosing a smaller house and having less furniture but then spending more disposable income on eating out and travel. The Baby Boomer mentality was having a bigger house filled with stuff was a need, the Millennial interpretation is the problem isn't the house being too small it's having too much stuff. My experience with close family members who are hoarders showed me that only a small number of things are really needed for health and happiness, after that it's needless.
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Old 01-16-2019, 03:10 PM
 
2 posts, read 467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brownbagg View Post
if you living a minimal lifestyle, why would anybody donate 40k a year. why would anybody donate to begin with. put that in saving and retire early

A truly mind-boggling comment. Why wouldn't you want to donate to charities just because you live a minimalist lifestyle? The minimalist lifestyle is about refining your life so that you minimize distractions such as unnecessary spending and clutter. That goal doesn't automatically negate a desire to help those in need. In fact, it would likely make it more possible for a person to focus on others besides themselves.

As several have already said, a person can make a large salary and still live a minimalist lifestyle. They would then still be able to retire early with the money they have saved despite having donated money to charities during their lifetime. Same for a person making middle income - they can still save and donate. The two are not mutually exclusive.

Also, your comment "Why would anyone donate to begin with" is very unfortunate! Hopefully you are never in a position to have to ask for help from anyone.

Last edited by Chloe700; 01-16-2019 at 03:23 PM..
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Old 01-17-2019, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Deep in the Woods
2,511 posts, read 2,565,514 times
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I live a minimalist lifestyle. For me, its more about autonomy. When you have huge bills, which today's consumer lifestyle encourages (buy more, put it on a credit card) you become a slave to your employer. Bosses will manipulate you if they know you are in over your head. My co-worker is always scrounging for overtime, extra work, and is generally desperate for raises because he owns too much, he brags about living extravagantly. Has a $10k monthly nut. My monthly nut is about $2k, if that. My employer knows she can't treat me like chit. If she does, I'll go elsewhere. So I basically come and go as I please. I could be unemployed for months and look for a really good-fit job if I needed to.

That is the best ownership of things- owning yourself, being a workhorse to no one.
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