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Old 12-22-2015, 01:34 PM
 
112 posts, read 72,814 times
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Is anyone here into Minimalism? Or do you consider yourself a minimalist?
I am not a minimalist per se, but I am HIGHLY interested in the lifestyle and I am minimalistic in many ways. Compared to most of my friends and family I live a very simple and "poor" lifestyle.
I like it this way, and am actually thinking of ways to make it more simple...
I love fashion, makeup, clothing, but I mainly thrift...
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Old 12-24-2015, 10:29 AM
 
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Good for you and keep on thrifting!

I am low materialism, frugal and slightly minimalist.
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Old 12-24-2015, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
11,011 posts, read 19,527,069 times
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Minimalism - Is Anyone Else Interested in This Lifestyle?
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Old 12-24-2015, 11:09 AM
 
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I'm a minimalist. I rarely buy things except food. I don't like to buy lots of furniture. I travel with only one hand carry bag, no check in.
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Old 12-24-2015, 02:13 PM
 
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I'm a minimalist out of necessity. I can't afford to buy stuff outside of my basic needs. It's only cool being a minimalist if it's a choice rather than just because you're poor.

I live in a 450 square foot studio apartment and I love living in such a small space. I live close to work and grocery stores, so I don't own a car and walk most places. That's good because I'd never be able to afford one. My transportation costs are under $10 for the entire year (5 bus rides). I do have a cell phone, but it's free. I recently splurged and got a Roku, but I won't be paying to watch anything. I do have internet that I use for work and entertainment, but other than that, food, toiletries, rent, utilities, and various insurances, I don't buy anything else. I've been wearing the same clothes since the 90s, I've never bought furniture, and I've had the same twin bed since the 5th grade. I'm 38 now. I do spend too much on food, but none of it is ever wasted.
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Old 12-24-2015, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma USA
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Minimalist by choice here.



Howdy all!
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Old 12-24-2015, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,255,791 times
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Minimalism can be viewed as a relative thing, although I doubt if that's what most people mean when they use the term. In that relative sense, someone can be viewed as minimalist if they live considerably below their means. Therefore if they have more than poverty level income, that means they will probably have some items and do some things which are not strictly necessary for a Spartan physical existence.

Let us posit an annual income of $150,000, which in my opinion is upper middle class at the very least. Let's say $35,000 in income taxes leaves $115,000 a year to spend. (Sure, I could be off on the income taxes). Now let's say that person (or family) spends "only" $75,000 a year and saves/invests/charitably donates the remaining $40,000. That person (or family) is living a minimalist life style compared to most other people with the same income, even though they are spending a lot more money than the average American has available to spend.
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Old 12-24-2015, 05:34 PM
 
25,144 posts, read 27,448,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Minimalism can be viewed as a relative thing, although I doubt if that's what most people mean when they use the term. In that relative sense, someone can be viewed as minimalist if they live considerably below their means. Therefore if they have more than poverty level income, that means they will probably have some items and do some things which are not strictly necessary for a Spartan physical existence.

Let us posit an annual income of $150,000, which in my opinion is upper middle class at the very least. Let's say $35,000 in income taxes leaves $115,000 a year to spend. (Sure, I could be off on the income taxes). Now let's say that person (or family) spends "only" $75,000 a year and saves/invests/charitably donates the remaining $40,000. That person (or family) is living a minimalist life style compared to most other people with the same income, even though they are spending a lot more money than the average American has available to spend.
Agreed.

A poster upthread mentioned living in a 450 square foot studio apartment. In many parts of the world, living alone in your own apartment is a luxury most people cannot afford. In places like New York & San Francisco they have micro apartments smaller than that which cost well over $1000 or even $2000 per month. In Hong Kong & Tokyo, families of 3 or 4 people share studio sized apartments, and this is considered normal for those places.
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Old 12-25-2015, 07:42 AM
 
1,153 posts, read 1,012,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Agreed.

A poster upthread mentioned living in a 450 square foot studio apartment. In many parts of the world, living alone in your own apartment is a luxury most people cannot afford. In places like New York & San Francisco they have micro apartments smaller than that which cost well over $1000 or even $2000 per month. In Hong Kong & Tokyo, families of 3 or 4 people share studio sized apartments, and this is considered normal for those places.
I'm the poster upthread and I realize that it's a luxury to be able to live in my own studio. I'm very thankful for this. I'm only able to afford it because I live in a low cost of living area. My rent is only $530 a month. If I had the option of going smaller for less, I'd definitely do it. But there are only a few apartments smaller than mine in my area and they cost more.
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Old 12-25-2015, 08:44 AM
 
12,116 posts, read 14,706,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Agreed.

A poster upthread mentioned living in a 450 square foot studio apartment. In many parts of the world, living alone in your own apartment is a luxury most people cannot afford. In places like New York & San Francisco they have micro apartments smaller than that which cost well over $1000 or even $2000 per month. In Hong Kong & Tokyo, families of 3 or 4 people share studio sized apartments, and this is considered normal for those places.
A relative, and SO, live in a room about 150 sf. Yes, New York City.
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