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Old 02-17-2016, 06:53 AM
 
8,711 posts, read 8,906,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
So what type of damages are acceptable? Front collision? Rear collision? :S stolen airbag?

Depends on the age of the car, it's value, and what sort of accident.


Any major collision I'd stay away from. Cars are designed to save the occupants in an collision by collapsing or buckling in certain areas. Wires get pinched, structural integrity changes, body gets tweaked, etc etc. I've dealt with a few rebuilt collision cars that had electrical issues from pinched wires we would find after the repair. Sometimes they go unnoticed, get wet, corrode, and you have issues.


I've seen older cars with not much value totaled out simply for getting keyed. A $4000 10-year old car needing a $2500 paint job would usually cause the insurance company to total it. At that point it could be bought back and retitled as salvage despite never getting hit.

I also know of someone who's car was totaled because the G/F dumped trans fluid all over the interior and knifed the seats. Again, no structural damage, just cosmetic.

Minor fender benders I'd consider as well. Getting a fender crunched along with some headlights could total out a lower-value vehicle.

But a car involved in a major accident and needing a whole new front clip? no way
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Old 02-17-2016, 07:47 AM
 
2,062 posts, read 1,324,398 times
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So older car, that's worth less than $5K are worth looking into. I thought it would be the other way, newer cars because everything is still new in there & the youthfulness of the car will push thru the misshapes. But it makes sense that newer car have higher value which means the damage has to be big enough to total it.


But I have heard stories of coworker whos garage got ran into by drunk driver. The insurance company fixed the 10 year old car but totaled the newer car even thought the damage looked similar.
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Old 02-17-2016, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 6,916,930 times
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If you're so desperate to save money so that you can have kids and be a SAHM that you're willing to consider a salvaged car, maybe you should consider giving up having a second car altogether and
  • riding to/from work with your husband
  • taking the bus
  • paying a co-worker to drive you to/from work
in order to save money.

That you lucked out with one salvaged car doesn't mean that you'll be so lucky again. If you don't get lucky again, you could end up spending thousands attempting to repair or replacing an unrepairable car ... or you could get into an accident due to a poorly repaired car.
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Old 02-17-2016, 09:29 AM
 
12,405 posts, read 9,195,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
Would you or do you drive a salvage or rebuilt title car to save money? Those cars seem to be significantly cheaper than clean title car.


My first car out of college was a rebuilt title. The dealer said it was stolen and bought from police auction. He fixed it up. It was only 2 years old car with very low mileage. As recently graduate with no job, I took the risk and figure based on the price if I get 5 years out of the car that is good. The car lasted me 10 years with minimal problem upto year 8. Now I am looking at new car and I don't know if I want to take the same risk as full adult.
Why? There are plenty of cheap non-salvage cars. Why take the risk?
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Old 02-17-2016, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,880 posts, read 15,624,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
So older car, that's worth less than $5K are worth looking into. I thought it would be the other way, newer cars because everything is still new in there & the youthfulness of the car will push thru the misshapes. But it makes sense that newer car have higher value which means the damage has to be big enough to total it.


But I have heard stories of coworker whos garage got ran into by drunk driver. The insurance company fixed the 10 year old car but totaled the newer car even thought the damage looked similar.
Is it a recent rebuild or has it been on the road awhile since the work was done? If it's been on the road for a few years it's probably fine.
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Old 02-17-2016, 03:32 PM
 
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Flood damage fresh water is not so bad, Flood damage Salt water run away.
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Old 02-18-2016, 07:17 AM
 
Location: the sticks
791 posts, read 1,246,428 times
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Happened to me (actually my college grad daughter) last year with a 12 year old creampuff, 70K miles new tires well maintained loaded with leather Ford. Rearended at a traffic light in slower downtown type traffic, airbags did not deploy, no glass broken.

It was totaled at like $3500 and replacing a dependable nice midsize is not inexpensive (as a poster above sez). I gave the choice - repair and no car payments (we gave her the ride after graduating, it had been Moms since new) or take a step back and pay for a 20K auto that is used with maybe more miles and unknown history. and 20K is a cheap one if you've looked.

Having a friend in the used car business was the key to this decision as he has a bodyman that gets all his auction bought inventory and makes them 'new' again (of course, they still have mileages).

Anyway, we made out fine, looks brand new since it got re-painted and the ride was the seller on this car anyway, and I got a new lawnmower with the surplus $$ (from insurance allowance).

Now, when she trades or sells, we have accepted that we may not get the true value of this ride.
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Old 02-18-2016, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
6,964 posts, read 5,183,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
So older car, that's worth less than $5K are worth looking into. I thought it would be the other way, newer cars because everything is still new in there & the youthfulness of the car will push thru the misshapes. But it makes sense that newer car have higher value which means the damage has to be big enough to total it.


But I have heard stories of coworker whos garage got ran into by drunk driver. The insurance company fixed the 10 year old car but totaled the newer car even thought the damage looked similar.
I've always felt that buying a salvage car is a great example of "the cheapest guy that spends more money than anyone else."

Any used car is a risk. Its a calculated risk, but a risk all the same. A salvage title is a much greater risk. In the absence of real mechanical expertise, I wouldn't.
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Old 02-18-2016, 08:45 AM
 
2,062 posts, read 1,324,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
Why? There are plenty of cheap non-salvage cars. Why take the risk?
I am exploring avenues. I could get a certified used car (the least risky) but it will have to be old with 50K+ mileages. I can get non-certified used car from dealer or privet seller (risky) that is 4-5 years old with some use. Many of these used cars have been in accidents but not totaled. Or I can get 1-2 years old brand new car with <20K mile that's rebuilt (highest risk but the newest car). No one will know the difference from outside.
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Old 02-18-2016, 09:25 AM
 
8,711 posts, read 8,906,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
I am exploring avenues. I could get a certified used car (the least risky) but it will have to be old with 50K+ mileages. I can get non-certified used car from dealer or privet seller (risky) that is 4-5 years old with some use. Many of these used cars have been in accidents but not totaled. Or I can get 1-2 years old brand new car with <20K mile that's rebuilt (highest risk but the newest car). No one will know the difference from outside.



50K miles isn't exactly a lot these days. If it came down to a $50K car that's never been wrecked, and a salvaged 20K mile car....I'd take the non-salvage car.


As someone who DIY's all his own repairs and maintanence, I still wouldn't touch a salvage title car unless I knew the specific reason for the salvage title...and it would have to be cosmetic....highly improbably for a low-mileage car though.
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