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Old 02-16-2016, 09:41 AM
 
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Would you or do you drive a salvage or rebuilt title car to save money? Those cars seem to be significantly cheaper than clean title car.


My first car out of college was a rebuilt title. The dealer said it was stolen and bought from police auction. He fixed it up. It was only 2 years old car with very low mileage. As recently graduate with no job, I took the risk and figure based on the price if I get 5 years out of the car that is good. The car lasted me 10 years with minimal problem upto year 8. Now I am looking at new car and I don't know if I want to take the same risk as full adult.
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Old 02-16-2016, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
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Depends on the nature of the damage and the ability of the person who did the repairs.
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Old 02-16-2016, 09:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
Depends on the nature of the damage and the ability of the person who did the repairs.


This.


All depends on why it was salvaged and who fixed it. You don't want a flood salvage car, and buying one that was in a major accident can be risky due to shoddy repairs, substandard structural repairs, or pinched, nicked wiring harnesses that can over time corrode and rear it's ugly head in electrical gremlins you can't track down due to being in hard to access areas.


If you buy a car salvaged due to a jealous ex dumping brake fluid all over the paint and knifing the leather seats....go for it. Just remember that when you go to sell, you will need to sell at a reduced price as well. Not an issue if you plan on driving til the car dies anyway
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Old 02-16-2016, 01:24 PM
 
280 posts, read 271,852 times
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I sold rebuilt title this week after keeping it for more than 6 years. I wont buy it again for following reasons
1) you dont know all the issues upfront.
2) In my case I had to move and because of hidden issues the car wont get registered in different state.
3) You pay less money upfront but more money as you go with repairs and such.
4) Its hard to sell.
Pros are insurance and taxes cost less.
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Old 02-16-2016, 03:32 PM
 
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I believe in some states it is not legal to retitle a salvage title car. It is a requirement that such a car be made 'permanently incapable of being operated on public roads'. I was told that this is to keep the VIN numbers from being used for stolen vehicles. Never dealt with one so I don't know for sure
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Old 02-16-2016, 06:30 PM
 
2,062 posts, read 1,324,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musman View Post
I sold rebuilt title this week after keeping it for more than 6 years. I wont buy it again for following reasons
1) you dont know all the issues upfront.
2) In my case I had to move and because of hidden issues the car wont get registered in different state.
3) You pay less money upfront but more money as you go with repairs and such.
4) Its hard to sell.
Pros are insurance and taxes cost less.
Did you have to do lot of repair in the 6 years you own it? Did you/could you have gotten it semi-inspected. I am not too worried about selling it later as I tend to drive my car to ground and if not I have enough of family to pass the car on. But, last time I got lucky. This time if I go down this route, I want to make it a well thought out process.
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Old 02-16-2016, 06:35 PM
 
2,062 posts, read 1,324,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
Depends on the nature of the damage and the ability of the person who did the repairs.
So what type of damages are acceptable? Front collision? Rear collision? :S stolen airbag?

I got my last one from a place that specializes in rebuilt car. I figure they have to be good since its their business to rebuilt car. They also take care of all title and inspection. What type of car can handle accident/rebuilt better than others (I.e Japanese brand survive crash better??)
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Old 02-16-2016, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,235 posts, read 9,990,552 times
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Unless you have verifiable details regarding the nature of the car problem, you are only asking for trouble. I suppose it also depends on how much you are paying for the car and how much you are willing to risk on buying a pig in a poke.
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Old 02-16-2016, 11:31 PM
 
Location: la la land
27,140 posts, read 11,338,839 times
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my insurance company (USAA) specifically asked if our cars had a salvage title, they didn't of course, but I'm assuming that they asked for one of two reasons - it would have increased our rates, or they might not have wanted to insure the car.
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Old 02-17-2016, 12:52 AM
 
Location: Carmichael, CA
1,933 posts, read 2,726,978 times
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I used to deal with this issue all the time at my previous job.

Some insurance companies will total a vehicle if the repair bill is more than a certain percentage of the current value. So you could have a simple fender bender and end up with a salvage title. Or a horrific accident that results in damage that can't totally be fixed, but looks good on the surface.

If you're considering a salvaged car:

1. Google the VIN number. A surprising number will come up with the last auction advertisement, showing pictures of the accident and a full listing of the damage.
2. Have it inspected by someone with a lot of auto body/repair experience. Stay away from flood damage. (Most of these, sadly, are shipped to other countries and sold for full price to unsuspecting people.)
3. Check with your insurance company. Some insurance companies will not insure a vehicle with a salvage title regardless of how little damage there really was.
4. There were instances of people obtaining salvage titles on car with no damage because it was cheaper/easier/less requirements. Stupid, but they did it.

Money can be saved, but put in the time to do your homework.
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