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Old 05-30-2016, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Suburban wasteland of NC
252 posts, read 151,010 times
Reputation: 258

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bUU View Post
I'm sorry you're having trouble following my comments. It would help to just take them at face value rather than trying to read into them what you may hope that they're saying, for whatever reason. The term "television production" should be interpreted literally, without any adornment or tilt.
At face value you still haven't said if you're even talking about network TV or cable. I don't hope or much care what you're trying to say.
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Old 05-31-2016, 03:42 AM
bUU
 
Location: Georgia
11,699 posts, read 8,163,805 times
Reputation: 7958
Quote:
Originally Posted by happygeek View Post
I don't hope or much care what you're trying to say.
I think this is the reality of the situation. It came across in your earlier remarks as undertone, but thanks for admitting it directly.
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Old 05-31-2016, 05:32 AM
 
24,511 posts, read 34,130,468 times
Reputation: 12779
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedownlow View Post
Congrats everyone on dumping those ripoff cable companies. I just find it hard being such a big sports fan. I watch sports only and have to deal with 99% other crap I never watch.
I'm a big sports fan as well. I've never considered cable companies to be a ripoff. It's some of the cheapest entertainment around.
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Old 06-11-2016, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Eastern Oregon
983 posts, read 696,685 times
Reputation: 1859
We tried a Roku. It seemed like too much work. We mostly watch the news. Hard to find live news....recently we switched to cable internet. Our internet speeds are faster now *and* cable tv is included in the price. It's cheaper than what we used to pay for internet alone...
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Old 01-12-2017, 09:32 AM
 
3,583 posts, read 1,513,048 times
Reputation: 9863
No TV for over a decade now. When we moved cross country, we figured the 20+ year old TV was unlikely to survive the move, so sold it. Never bought another one.

I think the statistics show the average American watches 20 hours of TV a week, in other words a part time job. In the absence of a TV, I can't figure out where the hell they find the time. Here's a list of the things I now do in lieu of watching television, that I think are more fun or beneficial anyway:

Practice music
Play music with friends
Exercise
Cook
have sex
Pray
Meditate
Read
Talk to my spouse
Get a coffee with friends and talk for an hour or so
Go to the library
Check out a movie from the library and watch it on the computer.

I don't much feel like giving any of these activities up for 20 hours a week just so I can keep up with the latest starlets and sitcoms.
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Old 01-12-2017, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,282 posts, read 79,469,982 times
Reputation: 38646
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyMunster View Post
Another channel dumper here. U-verse bundle is now history.

Taxes increase, little luxuries decrease.

We have a goal to secure our retirement years as I don't think SS will be there for us. Taxes are mandatory. TV is not. So long, Rick Grimes and Saul Goodman! It's been nice knowing ya...

Internet stayed - it's our main form of information, entertainment, and for business needs. Short of going to the library, I can't figure a way to dump it, too, and still do everything we must in our modern world.
having no TV is fine for younger people; the same as no newspapers. Our way of cummunicating and our way of being entertained are changing, like everything is life changes, but for those of us who are past middle age, our newspaper and our TVs are our main source of entertainment. I will add one more thing: unless you are very young, don't worry your SS will be there for you. Will it be changed some? Sure, but it will be there in some form.
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Old 01-13-2017, 07:30 AM
 
Location: NYC by week; ATL by weekend
971 posts, read 1,465,947 times
Reputation: 541
I give up cable, which is $200+ per month after football season each year and keep internet. I have the Firestick as well as NetFlix. I also own a large dvd collection and enjoy watching every last one of the movies over and over. If it wasnt for College Football I would not have cable ever...
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Old 01-13-2017, 11:15 AM
 
9,065 posts, read 9,225,623 times
Reputation: 4665
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
I think the statistics show the average American watches 20 hours of TV a week, in other words a part time job.
Average American watches ~ 5 hours of TV per day * 7 days per week = 33 hours per week.

David Sarnoff, president of RCA and a strong advocate of television, chose to introduce television to the mass public at the RCA pavilion at the 1939 world's fair. As a reflection of the wide range of technological innovation on parade at the fair, Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech was not only broadcast over the various radio networks but also was televised along with other parts of the opening ceremony and other events at the fair. On April 30, 1939, the opening ceremony and President Roosevelt's speech were seen on black and white television sets with 5 to 12-inch tubes. NBC used the event to inaugurate regularly scheduled television broadcasts in New York City over their station W2XBS (now WNBC). An estimated 1,000 people viewed the Roosevelt telecast on about 200 television sets scattered throughout the New York metropolitan area.

Radio station 2XG, also known as the "Highbridge station", was an experimental station located in New York City and in 1916 it became the first radio station employing a vacuum-tube transmitter to make news and entertainment broadcasts on a regular schedule, and, on November 7, 1916, became the first to broadcast U.S. presidential election returns by spoken word instead of Morse code.

A reporter from the NY Times compared the new TV technology to radio and declared that TV would be a failure as it required people to stand transfixed and watch the screen. He predicted that most American families would never have that much time available.
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Old 01-13-2017, 11:21 AM
 
214 posts, read 311,813 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
Average American watches ~ 5 hours of TV per day * 7 days per week = 33 hours per week.

David Sarnoff, president of RCA and a strong advocate of television, chose to introduce television to the mass public at the RCA pavilion at the 1939 world's fair. As a reflection of the wide range of technological innovation on parade at the fair, Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech was not only broadcast over the various radio networks but also was televised along with other parts of the opening ceremony and other events at the fair. On April 30, 1939, the opening ceremony and President Roosevelt's speech were seen on black and white television sets with 5 to 12-inch tubes. NBC used the event to inaugurate regularly scheduled television broadcasts in New York City over their station W2XBS (now WNBC). An estimated 1,000 people viewed the Roosevelt telecast on about 200 television sets scattered throughout the New York metropolitan area.

Radio station 2XG, also known as the "Highbridge station", was an experimental station located in New York City and in 1916 it became the first radio station employing a vacuum-tube transmitter to make news and entertainment broadcasts on a regular schedule, and, on November 7, 1916, became the first to broadcast U.S. presidential election returns by spoken word instead of Morse code.

A reporter from the NY Times compared the new TV technology to radio and declared that TV would be a failure as it required people to stand transfixed and watch the screen. He predicted that most American families would never have that much time available.
With 67 million Americans and rising each year recieving some kind of welfare I'm sure that number will increase.
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Old 01-14-2017, 06:39 PM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,342 posts, read 2,611,289 times
Reputation: 3814
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
I give up cable, which is $200+ per month after football season each year and keep internet. I have the Firestick as well as NetFlix. I also own a large dvd collection and enjoy watching every last one of the movies over and over. If it wasnt for College Football I would not have cable ever...
I was initially taken back by the $200+ figure, but yeah, I figure football season requires additional purchases.


I will say that if it weren't for Battlestar Galactica (back in 2004), and how extended cable channels were pretty half decent (e.g. Comedy Central had decent shows, movies, and standup comedy; History Channel had a lot of documentaries; and ditto with Discover Health Channel), I wouldn't have bothered with extended cable. I was going to quit after a few months of the trial period, but ended up going almost 3 more years before downgrading my internet tier, and cutting out cable TV (so no basic cable either).
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