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Old 08-22-2016, 01:54 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
73,028 posts, read 64,529,432 times
Reputation: 68992

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonybarnaby View Post
This is the first time in my life I've gone without cable. I was paying $190 for cable TV and Internet. I am now only paying $59.99 for Internet.

Cable TV is just excessively expensive. We rarely even watch it. I'll miss it during football season for sure, but not for the prices they demand.

Seems a lot of folks use amazon tv, Netflix and other streaming services. You can't beat the convenience of cable, but the insane prices are insulting. Cable will be obsolete soon at this rate.
I'm a little late to this party, but isn't basic cable necessary these days, for good reception, even if you only watch the "free" commercial channels and PBS? After everything switched to HD TV, it became more difficult to get good reception. Not being mechanically-minded, and already being inclined to liberate myself from TV-watching, I got rid of my TV at that point. How do people get the basic channels without cable? Someone came to my door recently trying to sell cable and internet service, and I'm thinking of getting TV again, so I can watch the great documentaries I've been missing. But not if it's going to cost a lot. I get bundled internet through the phone company.
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Old 08-22-2016, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,345 posts, read 4,388,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I'm a little late to this party, but isn't basic cable necessary these days, for good reception, even if you only watch the "free" commercial channels and PBS? After everything switched to HD TV, it became more difficult to get good reception. Not being mechanically-minded, and already being inclined to liberate myself from TV-watching, I got rid of my TV at that point. How do people get the basic channels without cable? Someone came to my door recently trying to sell cable and internet service, and I'm thinking of getting TV again, so I can watch the great documentaries I've been missing. But not if it's going to cost a lot. I get bundled internet through the phone company.
Use this site to see if you can receive an over the sir signal:

AntennaWeb.org
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Old 08-22-2016, 08:38 PM
 
1,222 posts, read 1,366,675 times
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It doesn't require cable to get watch PBS and other channels. You can buy a cheap antenna and attach the 2 wires to the back of your tv. Place the antenna as high as possible and select menu and channels. Select antenna as the source and program. See what channels you can pick up for free. In my case, I get about 50+ free channels of which most are broadcasting within about 45 miles of where I live.
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Old 08-22-2016, 08:50 PM
 
2,697 posts, read 2,797,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rivertowntalk View Post
It doesn't require cable to get watch PBS and other channels. You can buy a cheap antenna and attach the 2 wires to the back of your tv. Place the antenna as high as possible and select menu and channels. Select antenna as the source and program. See what channels you can pick up for free. In my case, I get about 50+ free channels of which most are broadcasting within about 45 miles of where I live.
I'm glad that works for you but where I am there are only 2 potential non cable channels I could get and I'm only 45 miles outside of Baltimore & Washington DC. The problem is hills/mountains. Both stations are small market stations and one just quit the NBC network and went independent.

The other problem is getting internet without cable. Cable is the only reliable highspeed internet around here. I am curious how many people get internet if they don't get it from cable unless they are in a high density area
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Old 08-22-2016, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,757 posts, read 47,613,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidValleyDad View Post
... I am curious how many people get internet if they don't get it from cable unless they are in a high density area
No cable in our town. Of the adjacent townships, to the North, East, West, etc. only one of those townships has cable.

We get our internet from 'dsl' phoneline.
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Old 08-22-2016, 10:47 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
73,028 posts, read 64,529,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rivertowntalk View Post
It doesn't require cable to get watch PBS and other channels. You can buy a cheap antenna and attach the 2 wires to the back of your tv. Place the antenna as high as possible and select menu and channels. Select antenna as the source and program. See what channels you can pick up for free. In my case, I get about 50+ free channels of which most are broadcasting within about 45 miles of where I live.
Thank you. I did get the recommended cheap interior antenna when the switch-over happened, but the reception was poor. It must depend partly on location. As we speak, I'm missing the PBS documentary on the 60's pop music groups, lol!
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Old 08-24-2016, 02:47 PM
 
1,809 posts, read 2,907,408 times
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I cut cable a long time ago. The only thing I want to watch are certain college basketball games & NCAA tourney, a few NBA playoff games, a couple of college football games. Right now I just go to sports bars to watch the few games I really want to see. What ESPN (and other sports channels) really needs to do is just "sell" individual games over the Internet. I would be glad to pay $5 for a certain NBA playoff game I want to watch. Or just be able to subscribe to ESPN just during basketball season, etc... They need to start doing this or they will get more and more and more cord cutters. It would have been nice to watch some of the Olympics too.

But other then a few sports games I want NOTHING to do with the rest of the garbage on cable TV. Get everything I need though Netflix and Amazon movies.

I pay $29.99 for Internet. $60 sounds very high.
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Old 08-24-2016, 03:01 PM
 
1,809 posts, read 2,907,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Thank you. I did get the recommended cheap interior antenna when the switch-over happened, but the reception was poor. It must depend partly on location. As we speak, I'm missing the PBS documentary on the 60's pop music groups, lol!
Get Netflix and you can watch all the Documentaries ever created whenever you want. Including a lot of PBS and Frontline documentaries that are on Netflix.
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Old 08-24-2016, 08:16 PM
 
1,222 posts, read 1,366,675 times
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Sorry to hear PBS is not within range. Here, there are 3 PBS channels. There are some unique tv antenna designs now that are made for long range. Some can reach 80-90 miles and rate fairly high. Amazon has a good selection.

No cable available here. My internet bounces off towers to an antenna on the roof.
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Old 08-25-2016, 07:35 AM
 
3,137 posts, read 7,904,178 times
Reputation: 1946
PBS shows are also available on your computer or Roku.
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