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Old 07-25-2016, 09:28 AM
 
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Anyone do this, or still doing this?
I've never been a "switcher" to chase deals, but I really want to lower my bill.

How long have you done the "cable TV shuffle?" Does it tick you off that you have to do this? That the companies won't lower bills for CURRENT customers, but if you leave and comeback two years later they will?

They're supposed to be competitors…but do you think they're really in cahoots with each other?

I'm not tech savvy, an don't understand Roku, streaming etc….
I LIKE have a program guide, because I like vegging and just going to the guide "to see what's on."

My brother once said to me "as long as you want to channel surf so you can just see what's offered "They've got you."" My understanding is that Roku, steaming etc, there's no program guide.

Ive never been a deal chaser. But I know a couple of people who are. And they say they have no problem switching back and forth. It just seems like such a PITA to me.
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Old 07-25-2016, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Saint Johns, FL
1,059 posts, read 823,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
Anyone do this, or still doing this?
My understanding is that Roku, steaming etc, there's no program guide.
Your understanding is incorrect. Depending on what service you get, you can certainly can get a channel guide on Roku. For example if you sign up for Sling.

But, for many, the beauty of streaming is you are no longer tied to the broadcasters schedule, so there is less need for a channel guide. Just watch what you when you want.
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Old 07-26-2016, 10:57 AM
 
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I LIKE channel surfing. There's no shortage of things to watch. I'm usually juggling two shows at once anyway. I'll be watching something on Bravo, channel surf during a commercial and discover, "Oh Rockford Files is on!" So then I'll start watching them both!

I guess I'll check in to Roku. I'm not even sure what it is or how it works, or what it costs.
If I don't want to watch TV on my computer screen, do I need a 'smart tv' for it?

Also if I leave a Tripple play and have to pay for Roku, and only get a double play with Verizon, by the time I play for Roku and the Double Pay how much will I have saved?
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Old 07-26-2016, 11:07 AM
 
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
I LIKE channel surfing. There's no shortage of things to watch. I'm usually juggling two shows at once anyway. I'll be watching something on Bravo, channel surf during a commercial and discover, "Oh Rockford Files is on!" So then I'll start watching them both!

I guess I'll check in to Roku. I'm not even sure what it is or how it works, or what it costs.
If I don't want to watch TV on my computer screen, do I need a 'smart tv' for it?

Also if I leave a Tripple play and have to pay for Roku, and only get a double play with Verizon, by the time I play for Roku and the Double Pay how much will I have saved?


You need a high speed (preferably wireless) internet connection and a Roku box (which at most is $99) and a TV. Plug the Roku into the TV, turn it on, it finds your internet and you're off. There are free program channels to subscribe to on Roku (you pay nothing as you have the internet connection and the box). You can watch these programs whenever you want, there is no schedule, they're always available.


There are channels you can subscribe to such as Neflix (about $8 a month), or Hulu ($8 a month). If you don't like the subscriptions, you cancel. There's no "disconnect" fee and no "reconnect" fee if you decide you want to subscribe again.
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Old 07-26-2016, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,880 posts, read 15,628,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
I guess I'll check in to Roku. I'm not even sure what it is or how it works, or what it costs.
If I don't want to watch TV on my computer screen, do I need a 'smart tv' for it?
When I used a Roku (I don't have anything now, other than a VCR and DVD player to watch movies) it was on a 1980s TV.
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Old 07-26-2016, 01:39 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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I have high speed internet and I subscribe to Netflix ($9) and Amazon Prime ($11) for streaming TV. You can't watch the episodes that are currently being released on TV. For example, I haven't seen the latest season of Walking Dead because it won't be on Netflix until sometime in the fall. If you need to be up to date on your TV shows, then keep cable. If you like to binge watch a season or all the seasons of a show, then the streaming services are the way to go.

I used to get irritated because my husband would have a schedule for TV shows and he'd have to be home for those shows every week, and if he had to miss one to go to a school event he would be pretty grouchy. Now we just watch things when we have time, and we don't have to try to make a schedule around his TV shows.

I don't have a Roku box, just blu-ray players with WIFI in the bedrooms and a Playstation 3 in the living room. Netflix works on all of those and Hulu would too. Amazon Prime works on the PS3 but not the blu-ray players that we have, which is a source of frustration for my kids.
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Old 07-26-2016, 07:50 PM
 
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I'm curious with how people get their internet access to use Netflix, Hulu, Roku, etc. I've never lived anywhere that I could get internet access other than from the cable company at a reasonable price. And the cost of internet is higher if it isn't part of a cable package. So how do you do it?
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Old 07-27-2016, 04:19 AM
 
1,212 posts, read 1,745,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidValleyDad View Post
I'm curious with how people get their internet access to use Netflix, Hulu, Roku, etc. I've never lived anywhere that I could get internet access other than from the cable company at a reasonable price. And the cost of internet is higher if it isn't part of a cable package. So how do you do it?
It's pretty much a mystery to all... but maybe offer a close neighbor some $$ to get their wifi password.
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Old 07-27-2016, 06:07 AM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
9,002 posts, read 16,123,201 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidValleyDad View Post
I'm curious with how people get their internet access to use Netflix, Hulu, Roku, etc. I've never lived anywhere that I could get internet access other than from the cable company at a reasonable price. And the cost of internet is higher if it isn't part of a cable package. So how do you do it?
My sister lives in a townhouse community for 15-20 years she got free internet just off the open WiFi signals that were open around her townhouse, Over the years as people have replaced there routers with password secured ones, the number of "Free" Signals have drop to the point where the only ones left were very weak.

Her Next Door neighbor now has given her password access to his WiFi .
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Old 07-27-2016, 06:51 AM
 
6,014 posts, read 6,518,511 times
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Can someone answer these….
-- So with Roku I can just come home, sit down at any time, go to a program guide, and channel surf and see what's on to watch, and go to it and it's already on, right?

-- And once you by Roku, there's no addition monthly costs? (Unless you want some add on), right?

-- Right now my internet is 75/75 (I don't even know what that means, is that enough if I'm also getting my TV that way?

-- If you have Roku, and a Double Play with a cable service or Verizon -- have you found that cheaper than a Triple Play?
Suppose with the Roku you have to increase you Internet speed, well now you're paying for that.

-- I tried to find a list of Roku channels and it had a free list, but then it said for other channels "link to your existing cable TC subscription"….the reason for getting Roku would be to DROP cable TV. Are channels like Bravo, HGTV, Ms TV, A&E, "free" with ROku?

Last edited by selhars; 07-27-2016 at 07:01 AM..
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