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Old 09-10-2016, 11:25 AM
 
3,457 posts, read 1,978,113 times
Reputation: 7833

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Oh, bite me people.!


The 8' heat strip is 7' of element heating on 220v.

The oil filled finned radiator is MAYBE 1.5' foot of heating element @ 110v.

HONESTLY which do you THINK is going to cost less to operate?????

We use typically $60/m of electricity, with the 8' heat strip going all month the bill was $237 HIGHER. I vowed NEVER AGAIN.

The oil filled was only $110 higher to keep the bonus room at 70F...same outside temp range! {one month Jan with heat strip exclusively, FEb one month with oil filled and heat strip on 50F as back up. I think it {the 8' heat strip on backup} kicked on twice in FEb to back up when it was -5f and -9f.

YOU DO THE MATH.


I will FIND out about the infared as I have yet to run it.

ALso, as Mathjak noted, the oil RETAINS AND RADIATES heat for awhile, while the heat strip cools down immediately. The infared also has a blower on it to cool down/dispense heat AFTER THE element has shut off.
No, the oil filled is NOT 'instant heat", it DOES take time to warm up and circulate the oil. Once running, maintains heat well through on/off cycles.

{The bonus room is out behind the garage.....it has 3 exposed walls {insulated} so ONLY one wall backs up to the kitchen. SHe might have shared walls, I don't know.}

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Old 09-10-2016, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,115 posts, read 9,199,435 times
Reputation: 8983
Quote:
My question is... Would it really be much more expensive to use a space heater than it is to use the electric baseboard heaters?
Resistance heat is resistance heat. Kilowatts in - kilowatts out.

Heat loss is a factor of the structure's insulation and its ability to reduce losses via radiation, convection, and conduction.

Biggest loser : glazing.
If you put insulated shutters on the glass during the night, you will reduce heat loss significantly.

If you wish to keep WARM without keeping the thermostat turned up, that is a different question - depending on activity.

If you're active, you can probably turn down the thermostat to 65F or lower.
If you're sedentary, you will probably want it warmer.

Possible options:
Reduce the need for space heating
. . . Wear warmer clothing
. . . Have blankets, comforters, etc, for couch sitting
. . . Put a quilt over the kitchen table, to keep legs warm (Japanese style)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kotatsu

Subdivide the space
. . . Reduce the volume needed to be heated
Siberian Reindeer herders live in tents, even when the temperature drops below -40 F for long periods of time. Their trick is to have a small tent within a larger tent. The layered approach buffers the heat loss. A similar technique was the old fashioned four poster bed with heavy draperies around it. In essence, it formed a small tent, and kept the sleeper snug. (Search on yaranga and polog)
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/382383824590443747/
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Old 09-10-2016, 11:28 AM
 
64,529 posts, read 66,075,955 times
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what are the current draws per foot and btu's at those voltages , that tells the story . voltage is irrelevant , the same wattage cost the same regardless of voltage . ,we get billed by wattage . you are limited in size at 120v that is all .
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Old 09-11-2016, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
15,145 posts, read 15,198,298 times
Reputation: 10872
Most space-heaters are (120V * 12.5A = 1.5KW), max.

The majority of fixed wall-heaters operate on (240V * 20amps = 4.8KW), max.

So yeah, the fixed wall-heaters are putting-out more heat....but they use a lot more power. As a mainly resistive load, the power is a simple (V * I) equation (240V * 20A = 4.8KW). So you will be a lot better off if you can mainly get by with using a space-heater.

I believe when producing heat, the BTU-output is pretty much a linear graph between
power-in and BTUs out. The differences in efficiency between a fixed wall-heater and a
space-heater is very small.
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Old 09-11-2016, 10:27 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,774 posts, read 37,441,293 times
Reputation: 20766
Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
Oh, bite me people.!


The 8' heat strip is 7' of element heating on 220v.

The oil filled finned radiator is MAYBE 1.5' foot of heating element @ 110v.
......
Not sure which planet you are from.

There are electric oil or glycol solution filled baseboard heaters up to 8' long. (Or longer by custom order)
And yes, they are 240v / 208v if you have it available. (Commercial buildings)

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 09-11-2016 at 10:41 PM..
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Old 09-11-2016, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,702 posts, read 20,456,636 times
Reputation: 30701
I hate baseboard heaters for just the reason you mentioned, OP - that you can't put furniture up against that wall. I think because of that, they're actually dangerous.

I live in an apartment with two wall electric heaters. I actually flipped the breakers to "off" for those wall heaters, as I wanted to put furniture up against those walls. When I need heat (not often, because I live at the coast where it's mild year-round), I have a small space heater. I can put the space heater right where I am. I think they're more effective than wall heaters because of that, too.

I also have a bed mattress cover that has electric heat - like an electric blanket, but it goes over your mattress, so it's under you - really toasty! So, I very rarely even turn on the space heater while I"m sleeping, because the heated mattress pad keeps me toasty - and they're really cheap to operate.

You can also get an electric blanket to put over you, while you're watching TV, etc., and they hardly use any electricity. When I lived in snow country in WA, I'd do that, when I lived somewhere that didn't have wood heat, etc. Just snuggle under the electric blanket, and you don't need to turn on the expensive electric heat.

If you live where pipes freeze, just be aware that you need to keep the place warm enough that the pipes don't freeze. You can also just wrap any pipes with electric heat tape, which is also really cheap to run. It's like an electric blanket for your pipes.
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Old 09-12-2016, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,388 posts, read 42,701,155 times
Reputation: 11465
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
It costs exactly the same to produce the same amount of heat, no matter what sort of electric you heat with.

However, with that understanding, I recommend the oil filled radiators. I think they distribute the heat more evenly and they are a lot safer than some of the other heaters that get hot enough to start fires. Safer and the heat is more even, plus they take up a small space.
Here is the right answer, OP.

You might want to think about an electric blanket for winter sleeping, you can turn down the main electric heat (I will go to about 50-55F, but I'm hard core).

Technically you *could* get one of those small kerosene burning non vented heaters, would make sense to have one such in case you have a power outage, that or similar propane burning, catalytic, non-vented heaters. Not sure these would save you any real money over electric for daily use.
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Old 09-15-2016, 12:28 PM
 
46 posts, read 31,421 times
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I use space heaters as needed in the rooms we are using. It saves a small fortune over central heat. I also run them on the low setting at .75kwh.
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Old 10-04-2016, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Kansas/China
4,526 posts, read 2,299,380 times
Reputation: 3150
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
It costs exactly the same to produce the same amount of heat, no matter what sort of electric you heat with.

However, with that understanding, I recommend the oil filled radiators. I think they distribute the heat more evenly and they are a lot safer than some of the other heaters that get hot enough to start fires. Safer and the heat is more even, plus they take up a small space.
I will also recommend this. Electric heaters are ridiculously expensive to run.

When I first bought my house we had all electric baseboard heaters. Probably 10 of them throughout the house. We only every had about 4 of them on, the rooms we went in the most. But our electric bill was $200-350 a month during the winter. Our electric bill is typically only about $50 when they are not running. We also didn't keep the house terribly warm and the heat does not spread out evenly at all. I hate them and would never recommend them. We have put in central heat and air and our bill never exceeds $100 a month, but that option doesn't work for you. Get the oil filled radiator. Electric heat is the worst. Put some thick covers over the Windows, that will help a lot. If you have storm windows make sure they are closed.
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Old 10-05-2016, 01:09 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,973 posts, read 17,131,123 times
Reputation: 30081
After this winter, try to move to an apartment without electric heat.

For this winter, use the oil filled radiators. Get that thin plastic film that you put over windows with a hair dryer--it works really well and you can see through it. Hang blankets on any interior doorways that lack doors so that you can close them off and save heat. Live in one room mostly.

You may have to tack small blankets over some of the windows that get especially cold--like the north facing ones or windows that get blasted with cold wind. (Make sure those storm windows are tightly locked, of course, and caulked around the edges.)

I guess if you live in Maine you already know this stuff. The usual drill. Hats and earmuffs in the house, also fingerless gloves, fleece jackets, shearling lined slippers, down comforters. Cook using the oven to also heat the house up, Electric heat is scary--so try to move out for next winter.
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