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Old 01-24-2017, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Liminal Space
1,018 posts, read 1,168,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 49erfan916 View Post
I showed my friend my weekly budget for groceries and she was surprised that i spent that much money on groceries by myself. Is 50 dollars a week for groceries for a single person that astronomically high?
Given today's food prices, if that is inclusive of eating out, coffee and alcohol I'd say it's definitely on the low side.

By the way who cares what other people think.

I once had a co-worker who acted shocked and called me a "foodie" when I said I spent about $50/week/person on food for my household. I found it ironic because the same person was buying lunch out every day for about $6-10, getting coffee at coffee shop across the street from our office at least once and often twice per day, and going to Happy Hour at least once and often twice per week, whereas the figure I quoted was inclusive of almost all those things, except joining Happy Hour once per month and getting occasional coffee on the go. After this conversation I stopped discussing my budget with co-workers.
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Old 01-24-2017, 11:45 AM
 
Location: in my mind
4,624 posts, read 6,151,527 times
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This is an interesting article from NPR about how food costs have declined in the past several decades.

Your Grandparents Spent More Of Their Money On Food Than You Do : The Salt : NPR

I have collected several other articles that reference similar research that connects the increase in obesity in our culture to decreased food costs beginning in the late 70's.
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Old 01-24-2017, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
19,148 posts, read 10,181,308 times
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I clicked on another thread about the cost of raising a child and interestingly, the link in it suggests that I'll be spending almost $70 per week on food for my 12 year old. That seems high particularly because my kid isn't a big eater - people tell me that changes when he becomes a teen so maybe I'll look back and wish it was $70 per week! lol!
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Old 01-24-2017, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,531 posts, read 79,802,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KittenSparkles View Post
This is an interesting article from NPR about how food costs have declined in the past several decades.

Your Grandparents Spent More Of Their Money On Food Than You Do : The Salt : NPR

I have collected several other articles that reference similar research that connects the increase in obesity in our culture to decreased food costs beginning in the late 70's.
Maybe food prices have gone down %age wise but we have ups and downs. How about beef a few years ago and even today? As for linking obesity with lower food prices, I don't buy that one for 1 minute. Obesity is due more to processed foods, sugar added to foods and lack of exercise. Remember also, depending on your age, grandparents may have grown a lot of their own produce. All of this plus people eat out more today than in generations ago. With most adults working outside the home eating out has become common place.
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Old 01-24-2017, 03:45 PM
 
Location: in my mind
4,624 posts, read 6,151,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Obesity is due more to processed foods, sugar added to foods and lack of exercise. Remember also, depending on your age, grandparents may have grown a lot of their own produce. All of this plus people eat out more today than in generations ago. With most adults working outside the home eating out has become common place.
Off-topic, but you may find this research interesting, as its conclusions are contradictory to your beliefs:


Review Says Inexpensive Food a Key Factor in Rising Obesity

ATLANTA May 22, 2014—A new review summarizes what is known about economic factors tied to the obesity epidemic in the United States and concludes many common beliefs are wrong. The review, authored by Roland Sturm, PhD of RAND Corporation and Ruopeng An, PhD, of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, notes that paradoxically, rising obesity rates coincided with increases in leisure time, increased fruit and vegetable availability, and increased exercise uptake. The review appears early online in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and finds at least one factor fueling the obesity epidemic: Americans now have the cheapest food available in history.

Today, two in three Americans are overweight or obese, with rates climbing steadily over the past several decades. Many factors have been suggested as causes: snack food, automobiles, television, fast food, computer use, vending machines, suburban housing developments, and portion size. The authors say forming a coherent picture is a challenge, but is necessary to assess whether the many proposed solutions, from encouraging physical activity and decreasing access to high calorie foods, to building more exercise-friendly environments, increased labeling, or even levying taxes on some foods, can make a difference.

After examining available evidence, the authors say widespread availability of inexpensive food appears to have the strongest link to obesity. They write: “Americans are spending a smaller share of their income (or corresponding amount of effort) on food than any other society in history or anywhere else in the world, yet get more for it.” In the 1930s, Americans spent one-quarter of their disposable income on food. By the 1950s, that figure had dropped to one-fifth. The most recent data show the share of disposable income spent on food is now under one-tenth.

Full article: Obesity and economic environments - Sturm - 2014 - CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians - Wiley Online Library
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Old 01-24-2017, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,247 posts, read 3,425,026 times
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Yeah, I'd say the quantity of our food is, at the least - a moderately important contributing factor to obesity.

When I think about what my gradparents ate it was not all that healthy... my grandmother made fruit pies & buttery mashed potatoes all the time. My grandfather's daily morning cuppa joe would include a significant helping of sugar. He ate peanut butter sandwiches all the time too.

Neither of them were overweight. It was that they didn't constantly eat all day and when they did eat, took smaller portions. I remember growing up that their dishes were literally smaller than the ones in my parents house.
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Old 01-24-2017, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
15,832 posts, read 5,477,633 times
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That is insanely low, I spend over $100/week on food for myself, our household food budget (me and fiance) is at least $700-$800/month
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Old 01-25-2017, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,247 posts, read 3,425,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
That is insanely low, I spend over $100/week on food for myself, our household food budget (me and fiance) is at least $700-$800/month
You must be eating out a lot.
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Old 01-25-2017, 01:48 PM
 
1,212 posts, read 1,756,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
That is insanely low, I spend over $100/week on food for myself, our household food budget (me and fiance) is at least $700-$800/month
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
You must be eating out a lot.
That's our food budget too and we hardly ever eat out. I do most food shopping at Costco and BJ's too. I eat mostly high protein foods including dairy and vegetables with not much starch. I cook just about everything except for chickens from the grocery store which are cheaper, rotisserie -style. Also make my own yogurt which is a lot cheaper. He eats a fair amount of starchy foods which are cheaper, but he's developed an addiction to these tasty little macarons we get at Costco and given the rate they get eaten, it adds another $60 to the food budget. I also exercise like crazy which accounts for a high rate of food consumption I guess. I like what I eat and think overall it's worth it though we could certainly find ways to cut back, or substitute, if we really wanted.

I think eating out sucks in terms of quality, nutrition, and quantity for the price paid. I can't imagine how much it would really cost if I was eating meals out all the time. I'd be either starving or obese too.
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Old 01-25-2017, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Bay Area California
711 posts, read 392,266 times
Reputation: 1502
This thread got me curious so I ran the calculations. We're in the same geographic area as the OP. We spent about $63/person/week in 2016 inclusive of eating out. We don't eat out often - maybe once or twice a month at most.

We also shop mostly at our farmers market, Trader Joes and Costco. A good chunk of the expenditure is the farmers market. Locally it isn't always cheaper than a regular grocery store but the quality is infinitely better. I don't think I've ever thrown out something purchased at the farmers market. I got very tired of throwing out produce items from the grocery store that rotted before they ripened or had zero flavor.
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