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Old 01-16-2017, 08:46 PM
 
525 posts, read 265,805 times
Reputation: 98

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MNTroy View Post
Than it sounds like a great deal. And remember it is only temporary.
My dad gave me the same advice. He said that once I move I should save money. The next move I should make should be looking into property.

 
Old 01-16-2017, 09:25 PM
 
24,760 posts, read 26,848,973 times
Reputation: 22799
Quote:
Originally Posted by CollegeCurious View Post
Thanks. I just did not expect my life to be this way at 24. I wanted to at least be making a good amount of money and working a great job
I know it sucks when your expectations aren't met. But you're not doing that bad. I am sort of happy that landlord wouldn't rent to you. The best thing you can do when you are young is to keep your expenses low and save/invest the difference. Saving and investing when young reaps HUGE rewards down the line. Most people spend more on rent/mortgage than they truly should. Just because you can spend more than 25% of your income on rent doesn't mean it's a good idea. (And just because lots of other people are doing that doesn't make it a good idea, either.)

Last edited by mysticaltyger; 01-16-2017 at 09:41 PM..
 
Old 01-17-2017, 04:43 PM
 
3,276 posts, read 1,955,592 times
Reputation: 6307
I started over at 49 when my husband became disabled. Went back to school, got a new career, got a Master's... everything worked out in the end. Money was pretty tight for quite a while.
 
Old 01-17-2017, 10:26 PM
 
24,760 posts, read 26,848,973 times
Reputation: 22799
Quote:
Originally Posted by CollegeCurious View Post
My dad gave me the same advice. He said that once I move I should save money. The next move I should make should be looking into property.
You should save money no matter what. Treat it like brushing your teeth every day. Just something you are going to do no matter what.

Nothing wrong with buying a house, but once again, you don't want to be spending 30% of your gross income on housing. Keep it to 25% or less. That will give you money to save so that you have flexibility/options in life.
 
Old 01-18-2017, 11:15 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,029 posts, read 25,857,224 times
Reputation: 39506
Quote:
Originally Posted by CollegeCurious View Post
........My fiancé and I are currently looking for homes for rent ......I make 1900 per month/ 985 bi weekly. After paying rent, that would leave me with 300+ .......
All rent based upon your salary, so this "fiance" of yours contributes nothing? You are supporting him? You don't make enough income to support a deadbeat man.

You could not afford that trailer. After paying rent, you would still have to pay your utilities and your insurance, which would take a big chunk out of that $300. Then you need to eat and buy gasoline and insurance for your car. The agent did you a favor by turning you down for insufficient income.,
 
Old 01-18-2017, 11:35 AM
 
525 posts, read 265,805 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
All rent based upon your salary, so this "fiance" of yours contributes nothing? You are supporting him? You don't make enough income to support a deadbeat man.

You could not afford that trailer. After paying rent, you would still have to pay your utilities and your insurance, which would take a big chunk out of that $300. Then you need to eat and buy gasoline and insurance for your car. The agent did you a favor by turning you down for insufficient income.,

FYI: Rent is due on the first and utilities would be due every middle of the month. My rental insurance is only 20 bucks. I get 2 or 3 pay checks in the month. I am on bi weekly pay. My current place is 745+ and my utilities total to just about 200 every month. I do not inquire about things I can not afford.

I make more than my fiance' which is why most things are in my name and his end is to supply groceries, gas, and savings. You do not know our lives

Last edited by CollegeCurious; 01-18-2017 at 11:53 AM..
 
Old 01-19-2017, 10:29 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,029 posts, read 25,857,224 times
Reputation: 39506
You could still use your boyfriend's salary to help qualify for rent. Unless you are trying to sneak him in without the landlord knowing about him.
 
Old 01-19-2017, 12:07 PM
 
3,487 posts, read 1,997,936 times
Reputation: 7967
College curious:

here is some advice:

If your fiance is going to live there with you, YOU NEED him/her on the lease!

Many financial wizards suggest: take the total cost of the bills and divide it into your total income between the two of you, then take that percentage of each of the participant's income as what they pay into the fund.

Here's a way that you will each pay EXACTLY THE SAME PERCENTAGE amount of your total income BUT NOT the EXACT SAME DOLLAR figure:

SO: if you make $70/m and he/she makes $30 then the total income is $100 and if the total cost {rent, utilties, etc} for living there is $60, then you take 60% of each others incomes and put into a general fund. SO you would take 60% of your $70/m {$42} you pay, and he/she would take 60% of the $30 he/she makes {$18} and you come up total of the $60 it costs to live there. The bills are paid and you EACH have the SAME PERCENTAGE of expense/income ratio. SO you pay $42 and he/she pays $18 and you BOTH have the same percentage left over to use for other expenses. Doesn't matter who makes more or less.

HE/SHE MUST pay something AND BE ON THE LEASE, OR in my opinion DON'T LIVE TOGETHER.

the combination of the total of both incomes will get you cleared for the apartment you want, but each regardless of each income level will pay the EXACT SAME PERCENTAGE To run the place=, so hte fact you make more is NO EXCUSE for NOT combining incomes to qualify.

Starting over is hard, I know, but at least you are NOT starting over from being homeless with just a back pack to your name while you sleep under a bridge next to the railroad tracks, like I once was doing!!!!

YOU CAN DO IT! JUSt DO IT TOGETHER!

 
Old 01-20-2017, 10:06 PM
Status: "I am in preparation mode!" (set 13 days ago)
 
5,515 posts, read 5,514,151 times
Reputation: 4212
Quote:
Originally Posted by foundapeanut View Post
I started over at 33. Went back to school to get a Masters degree. Hey life happens anyway. You can make a change or find yourself in the same situation the rest of your life. 27 years ago.

I know women that are starting over in their 60's. Better late than never.
It has been difficult but I am taking it one day at a time. Opportunity is a blessing.
 
Old 01-20-2017, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,810 posts, read 20,615,933 times
Reputation: 30986
Yep,my first thought was, why are you the only one qualifying? Eventually, you will be sorry about supporting the deadbeat fiance.
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