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Old 01-19-2017, 07:29 AM
 
4,215 posts, read 4,434,111 times
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you have way too much time on your hands
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Old 01-19-2017, 07:31 AM
 
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We've tried to live in less expensive neighborhoods a couple of times. We weren't a good fit. I know that I worked and scrimped and saved or whatever to have something a little nicer. I've noticed that when I have something a little nicer other people notice too. I don't like to feel like I'm being watched or if I make one misstep, someone will wipe out what I own. I'd only live in a high crime area if it were my only option.

I have to have decent neighbors. When you pay more money to live someplace, you find you usually have neighbors who work for a living and take care of their things better. This isn't saying all people who don't work are bad. The odds are you will get better neighbors who do take care of what they have.

The person who said that people who live in the flyover area, but have lower incomes may be better off is correct. I've known people who lived in cheap trailer houses because that was the best they could afford. At least they owned it and a little land and payed their own way in life. They weren't unnecessarily relying on the government.
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Old 01-19-2017, 10:54 AM
 
Location: USA
1,809 posts, read 2,139,957 times
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Your insurance rates are based on your address. If you move to a high crime area, you will pay more for insurance and that will probably wipe out any savings on housing costs
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Old 01-19-2017, 11:12 AM
 
3,458 posts, read 1,978,113 times
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I once literally lived under a bridge next to the railroad tracks, so YES I could live in a cheap neighborhood.

I am fortunate now to live in a moderate priced great rural neighborhood in one of the smallest homes on the street, a starter home that will be my final home, at least here. If I move south to retire I will look for the same.

Thank GOd the days of living under that bridge are behind me!

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Old 01-19-2017, 11:34 AM
 
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I learned the hard way (am learning the hard way) but we are not in low income area because of frugality. Instead my husband has too many family in the neighborhood & he wants to be close by to help them. some of the issues we have faced living in low income neighborhood


1) Burglary- You can't leave the house without worrying about the house being broken into. Most house in the neighborhood has lot of people & lot of unemployed people so it is not difficult for them to have people at home all time but for us (2 working people) we couldn't house sit. We got jobs to get to
2) Drug dealers living in the neighborhood - we know several place that deals with drug. Even the 10 yr old kids know who is selling
3) Upkeep - the city doesn't take care of poor neighborhood as well, I am guessing due to less tax income generated by that area. The snow doesn't get cleaned & roads are never fixed. The neighbors don't have extra income to beautify their house & most neighbors are renters.
4) No nice gym in neighborhood - I had to drive 20 min to middle class neighborhood for decent gym. I am not going to rundown place same with shopping. Malls are not in low income area


Yes being poor does not equal being a criminal. I grew up poor but the truth of the matter is criminals are more noticeable in poor neighborhood. Maybe its because we are left with the dumb criminals who can't hide their crime very well vs. criminals in upper class neighborhood
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Old 01-19-2017, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
24,717 posts, read 59,563,864 times
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We did.

There were problems and there were delights.

Some of our neighbors stole from us, others watched out for us.

Once we got accepted, we got invited to family parties and introduced to a culture we would never have experienced.

Came home once after two weeks away at trial and found someone had mowed our lawn. Never found out who.

We learned to deal with safety/security and never had any major problems.

We did have a fleeing fugitive jump our backyard fence and the police told us to lie on the floor and do not come outside. Turned out he jumped out fence, ran through the back yard and jumped the fence again. Also turn out he was not armed, but the police thought he might be.

We had a very strong neighborhood association. We even had patrols 2x a night where we went in groups of two or more (once in a while a very large group would collect together) and just walked around for an hour observing things and reporting if needed. There were enough people available we only needed to do it one time a week, but we often went more often. It was fun to walk around and talk with a neighbor/friend. Some days we went both times just because we wanted to. After nine years we sold the house for $582,000 more than we bought it for, so it was not a bad experience.

Schools were terrible (no one at our neighborhood school spoke English), but we learned to work around that too.

Our insurance was cheap. $680 a year I think.

We could walk to the downtown where there were some decent jazz clubs and art galleries. There was a secondary downtown that was closer, but all fo the shops were ethnic, few people spoke English, the movie theater seats were sticky and smelled weird and I once walked into a store and the shopkeeper yelled "No gringos - Go!" at me. So we mostly walked the extra seven blocks or so to the traditional downtown.

In between the regular downtown and the ethnic downtown there were a lot of hookers. One night walking home with my wife a hooker asked me if I wanted a date for the evening. My wife snapped at her "I am his wife!" Without missing a beat the hooker said "that is OK, I do threesomes"

We thought it was more funny than scary.

We usually had one or two 200 pound mastiffs walking with us (except when we went out for dinner or to drink and listen to jazz.). That may be part of the reason we had few/no issues. People tended to avoid us.
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Old 01-19-2017, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,472,880 times
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After I retired, we migrated to an area that has suffered a depressed economy for many decades. The average household incomes here are pretty low.

With my small pension, I could not afford to live in my home state [California]. But here in New England we fit in well.
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Old 01-19-2017, 06:53 PM
Status: "I am in preparation mode!" (set 4 days ago)
 
5,514 posts, read 5,494,602 times
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I have lived in low income areas. It was all I could afford. However, I will do my best to not live in neighborhoods like that again.

I have been fortunate to find an apartment where the rent is low and I live in a good neighborhood. My apartment is small but it works for me.

Honestly, I do not understand how people survive paying such high rent. How do they save and pay debt?

The NYC forum is filled with threads on affordable housing. I took a look one day and I was completely astonished. The rent quoted is a mortgage not rent. If I paid those prices, I would be living from pay check to pay check.
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Old 01-19-2017, 08:32 PM
 
12,404 posts, read 9,195,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atltechdude View Post
No, plus if you buy then you don't actually save money considering your house will appreciate more in better areas.
You haven't accounted for higher interest, taxes, insurance, maintenance. You can have appreciation but still lose money in the end.
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Old 01-19-2017, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,472,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
You haven't accounted for higher interest, taxes, insurance, maintenance. You can have appreciation but still lose money in the end.
Why would you assume that all these things would be higher ?
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